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Lets say we have a Russian name which contains "й" and we want to write it in English. For example Николай. The right way to spell it in English should be Nikolay or Nikolai? Same for Dmitrii / Dmitriy.

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    There are standards that are used by government institutions and which do not care for the phonetic similarity of Russian names transcripted to latin alphabet. In fact they use the same rules for any target language - English, French etc. And there are different other ways that try to keep phonetic similarity. So the answer to 'right way to spell' may differ depending of what you want to get.
    – Artemix
    Sep 15 '16 at 10:02
  • I see. I thought there was only one standard. Thank you for the fast answer.
    – FF12b
    Sep 15 '16 at 10:06
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    A wiki article about Romanization used in passports. According to it, in 1997 y was used for й and since 2010 i is used for й. And before 1997 French was used instead of English and so j was used in passports.
    – Artemix
    Sep 15 '16 at 10:41
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    but since you are not bound by nonsensical governmental regulations you can use whatever spelling you think is the most appropriate Sep 15 '16 at 11:49
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    Phonetically it corresponds to "y" as in "yes".
    – Anixx
    Sep 15 '16 at 15:56
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The newest standard of Russian - English transliteration was adopted in 2012 for official use, for passports, for example. The letter й should be written like i. Nikolai,Dmitrii.

В п. 97 приказа ФМС России N 320 от 15 октября 2012 г. указывается, что транслитерация (простое замещение русских букв на латинские) производится в соответствии с рекомендованным ИКАО международным стандартом. Описание рекомендаций по транслитерации включено в документ «Doc 9303. Машиносчитываемые проездные документы» (часть 3 «Спецификации, общие для всех МСПД», раздел 6, блок B «Транслитерация кириллических знаков»)

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  • any link would be useful
    – shabunc
    Sep 15 '16 at 21:34
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    base.garant.ru/70712440/#block_1000
    – V.V.
    Sep 16 '16 at 2:53
  • transliteratciia.ru
    – V.V.
    Sep 16 '16 at 3:01
  • Oh not again! I already had to endure what is effectively a name change when they switched from the French to English transliteration in passports. It's not always fun.
    – Zeus
    Sep 19 '16 at 2:59

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