3

I can't think of an example, the following doesn't make sense, I think(?),

Куда ты пошёл, когда ты читаешь газеты?

but illustrates my question. Are there times when context dictates mixing verbal aspects in a sentence?

PS. For example. If I wanted to say that I start reading the paper, but not finish my action, after going to the office, would it be;

Я читал газеты, когда я пошёл в офис.

PPS. A related question is.... Is mixing tense in English analogous to mixing aspect in Russian?

3
  • Perhaps what you mean is something like: Куда ты пошёл, когда ты готовишься к экзаменам? This is very colloquial but occurs in wild. – ddbug Aug 7 '17 at 21:12
  • 1
    A very similar question was answered here: russian.stackexchange.com/q/10676/2104 – Sergey Slepov Aug 8 '17 at 5:56
  • 1
    re: "doesn't make sense" - it still does make sense as a compound statement, consisting of two simple independent ones :-D – Arioch Aug 8 '17 at 7:28
2

Not sure what exactly are you asking, but yes, you can mix aspects in a single sentence:

  • Ещё когда я ходил (impf.) в школу, я записался (pf.) в шахматный кружок.

  • Ты идёшь (impf.) в магазин, чтобы купить (pf.) вино

  • Ах, как хочется (impf.) вернуться (pf.), ах, как хочется (impf.) ворваться (pf.) в городок.

If I wanted to say that I start reading the paper, but not finish my action, after going to the office

If you have been to the office and back and now you are reading your paper, it would be:

Я сходил в офис, а теперь читаю газету.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.