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I just bought a Russian samovar, and cannot read this type of Russian script... could you provide the modern Russian script? Thanks!

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It's definitely a manufacturer's mark, in old (pre-revolutionary) Russian orthography.

It reads:

  • ЯКОВЪ = Яков = Yakov ~ Jacob (probably the first name of manufacturer)
  • НЕГИНСКИ = Neginski (probably the last name, but due to the fact that the caption is extremely weared off, it might had more letters before or after that originally)
  • ВЪ ТУЛѢ = В Туле = in Tula, city of origin, the main manufacturing center for samovars
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  • Why Негински? Shouldn't it be Негинский in Russian? Can it be an American forgery? – AlexVB Apr 6 '18 at 6:59
  • Wow! Thanks so much! This is more than likely from around the early 1800's... It came with a note, that said in the 1930's, ceremonial teas were often organized by the committee ladies to raise money for the Russian Room. After the room was completed, several old Russian brass samovars were donated to the treasures. This was one of them. I like to restore old samovars... This is the first Russian one I purchased... Thanks again! – M.A Apr 6 '18 at 7:34
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    @AlexVB Those kind of surnames have Polish origin, twice so when with Jewish name of Jacob. And in Poland they would indeed be written as "-ski". Now, after full russification those surnames would be seen as kind of possessive case and would end with "-скiй" rather than "-ский". See part 1.4 and a photo. Similar geographic terms – Arioch Apr 6 '18 at 11:20
  • BTW, when searching in Yandex for such a name - this pops up: jewage.org/wiki/ru/Profile:P0160698533 - i think it reinforces my idea, that the surname was Jewish and came from Poland. Perhaps there is was seen in its original not yet totally russified form. – Arioch Apr 6 '18 at 11:23
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    Яковъ Чегински въ Тулѣ ("Yakov Cheginski in Tula") img-fotki.yandex.ru/get/3409/xium.15/0_28207_e95d87a_orig – Quassnoi Apr 6 '18 at 23:02

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