В последнее время мы все много чего услышали о фейк-новостях и о том, что ныне мы живем в эпоху "постправды".

vs: В последнее время мы все многое услышали о фейк-новостях и о том, что ныне мы живем в эпоху "постправды".

I'm wondering how these two are nuanced in meaning -- when to use one or the other.

  • 1
    the 1st has a slight undertone of disdain/skepticism towards the subject, could be replaced with много всего or всякое, in the latter the undertone is stronger – Баян Купи-ка Sep 13 at 17:14
  • много чего — A lot of (stuff)—literally (a lot of that/what/ what-such) / многое — Much. So we've heard a lot of things (different stuff) vs. We've heard much (a lot). – VCH250 Sep 14 at 13:36
  • to address VCH250's comment, много чего and многое differ not so much in meaning as in usage, but what would closer correspond to VCH250's rendering with much/a lot is много слышали rather than многое услышали, многое still means different things – Баян Купи-ка Sep 14 at 15:16
  • That's right) It means much, a great deal. Basically Многое is a noun here, or something similar, whereas много is an adverb of quantity. You are perhaps not totally clear on the meaning of 'much, a lot'. To learn 'a lot/ much' isn't the same as to learn 'a lot of things'. It's the same concept in Russian. – VCH250 Sep 15 at 13:55
  • 1) i'm pretty confident of my understanding, We've heard much (a lot) means heard many/enough times, NOT many (different) things, that's the exact reason why your comparative example isn't very accurate, because the OP's sentences both have the same meaning, that is many different things, and only differ in the undertone... for a sentence in Russian to mean many/enough times, the adverb много should be used... 2) многое is not a noun, but a numeric pronoun, which functions as a direct object of the verb слышать – Баян Купи-ка Sep 15 at 19:41

В последнее время мы все много чего услышали о фейк-новостях и о том, что ныне мы живем в эпоху "постправды".

Этот вариант звучит, на мой взгляд, лучше и, наверное, грамотнее чем второй. Хотя, отмечу, что "МНОГО ЧЕГО" не характерно для официального стиля. Это характерно для разговорной речи.

Примеры:

Много чего я слышал, но такое слышу впервые.

Будет сказано много чего на этой встречи, но всё то многое, что будет сказано, не будет играть ни какой роли в твоей работе.

А ты много чего знаешь?

Все примеры находятся на грани простонародного стиля. Они верные, но характерны для людей не утруждающих себя изящностью речи.

В последнее время мы все многое услышали о фейк-новостях и о том, что ныне мы живем в эпоху "постправды".

Многое здесь мне не нравится, так как многое лучше звучит, когда есть с чем сравнить это многое. То есть:

Многое, из того что нам говорили о фейковых новостях, мы услышали, но кое-что не услышали. Многое уже услышано (из того, что было сказано).

Я думаю, второе предложение нужно изменить.

В последнее время мы все много слышали о фейк-новостях и о том, что ныне мы живем в эпоху "постправды".

Услышали мне тоже не очень нравится. Услышали хорошо использовать если к вам кто-то обращался. А слышали, это вы сами слушали, но лично к вам никто не обращался.

This is an example of situation, when additional words are not required, because a modern short alternative exists. As a result, 'многое', 'много' can be used both in formal and informal speech, while 'много чего', 'много что', 'много такого' can only be used in informal speech. If you look at the word added, you`ll see it does not bring any additional information, it only adds volume to this part of the sentence, so more attention is paied to the idea.

There are other words, that can be extended in informal speech only, like 'быстро так', 'что же', etc.

Back to your example, use 'многое' to be sure you are not adding 'water' to your text. Use 'много чего' if you wish to express some insolence in the intonation, like in all these stories about fake-news : )

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.