7

I am very happy to have found such an interesting forum and to have received an excellent detailed answer from a native speaker to my first question, and I am very tempted to ask about something else I have not yet fully understood in the Russian language. I am very curious what the native speakers have to say.

At my university in Japan I have got an exercise on sequence of tenses, and the exercise is to translate the following to Russian:

I sliced sashimi from a convulsing squid - actually the one I had wanted to eat myself - and served the guest waiting for his meal. Walking back, I glanced in the mirror to see whether he was looking at me.

My approach is to always strive in the most utmost manner to translate absolutely flawlessly and in the most natural way and to deeply understand why I make this or that choice.

Thinking hard and making difficult choices, I came up with this:

Я нарезала на сашими конвульсирующего кальмара - кстати, того самого, которого хотела было сама съесть - и подала ожидавшему свою трапезу гостю. Идя обратно, я глянула в зеркало, не смотрит ли он на меня.

I am still very unsure whether I made the best choices, and feel that I have not yet fully understood sequence of tenses in Russian.

I would like to humbly ask the natural speakers to answer the following questions of mine:

  1. Конвульсирующего or конвульсировавшего? Are both variants acceptable? Is any of them preferable? If so, which one? I chose the present tense to stress that the squid was convulsing as I sliced it.

  2. Хотела было or захотела было or раньше хотела or раньше захотела? I was taught that the former two variants are the proper traditional ones and used by well-educated people, whilst the latter two variants are simplified and used by poorly educated simpletons. Choosing between the first two variants, I chose the first one because it is more neutral and seems to better fit the original text.

  3. Ожидавшему or ожидающему? I intuitively chose the past tense because the point is not that the guest was waiting at the moment at which I served him, but that he had waited. At the very moment at which I served him he obviously was not waiting anymore.

  4. Смотрит or смотрел? I was taught that the sequence of tenses in indirect speech is natural (он сказал, что принимает трапезу), whilst in relative clauses - attracted (он увидел рыбу, которая барахталась). According to my professor, it is a grave mistake to break this rule. But how do I have to classify the clause in the sentence with the mirror?! It is neither indirect speech nor a relative clause.

  5. At how many places in my Russian translation I utterly failed, leaving hints I am not a native speaker? Word choices, word sequence, and so on. I would be happy to receive frank criticisms.

I am humbly looking forward to reading enlightening answers of native speakers of this highly complex and powerful language.

7
  1. Конвульсирующего or конвульсировавшего? Are both variants acceptable? Is any of them preferable? If so, which one? I chose the present tense to stress that the squid was convulsing as I sliced it.

I think present participle, the one did you opt for, is preferable. Past participle would have a connotation of convulsing at one point in the past but not necessarily at the moment of slicing.
On the other hand, had the sentence required the imperfective predicate нарезАла instead of нарЕзала, both participles would mean convulsing concurrent with the act of slicing.

Check also answers to a similar question Может ли причастный оборот не согласоваться во времени с целым предложением?

  1. Хотела было or захотела было or раньше хотела or раньше захотела? I was taught that the former two variants are the proper traditional ones and used by well-educated people, whilst the latter two variants are simplified and used by poorly educated simpletons. Choosing between the first two variants, I chose the first one because it is more neutral and seems to better fit the original text.

The use of particle было is a great idea. However it has a specific connotation which may not fit the context of the sentence, because it modifies a verb to mean an act which lasted for a brief moment. When an act denoted by the verb lasted for some time in my opinion the adverb поначалу/сначала would fit better. The adverb раньше would have been altogether incorrect.
Also be aware that in spoken language this particle было almost never occurs. It's a language feature well on its way to being an anachronism whose use is now mainly relegated to literature.

  1. Ожидавшему or ожидающему? I intuitively chose the past tense because the point is not that the guest was waiting at the moment at which I served him, but that he had waited. At the very moment at which I served him he obviously was not waiting anymore.

Same as 1. But here past participle is equally appropriate because there's no connotation of necessarily contemporaneous activities.

  1. Смотрит or смотрел? I was taught that the sequence of tenses in indirect speech is natural (он сказал, что принимает трапезу), whilst in relative clauses - attracted (он увидел рыбу, которая барахталась). According to my professor, it is a grave mistake to break this rule. But how do I have to classify the clause in the sentence with the mirror?! It is neither indirect speech nor a relative clause.

Here you do indeed deal with relative (subordinate) clause in the form of indirect question, attached by means of conjunction ли (see косвенные вопросы, исключение, частица ли), and these do require verb in present tense, provided that action in subordinate clause is concurrent with the one expressed by the main clause.

Я нарезала на сашими

Into Russian popular culture such cuisine terms as суши and сашими came relatively recently, that is after the USSR collapse, from the West. Following the USSR dissolution many standards ceased to be adhered to or enforced, including standards of transliteration from Asian languages in particular (by now the situation has somewhat improved but the damage so to speak has been done), that's why these two words are spelled with [ш] mimicking English transliteration from the Japanese.
The standard for transliteration of Japanese phonetics with Cyrillic alphabet is Polivanov's transliteration system, according to which Japanese phoneme is transliterated as [cи] instead of [ши] as it is in English. And not without a reason.
In Russian [ш] is always hard, therefore -ши- is read as [шы] as per Russian phonetic principles. But its Japanese counterpart is always soft, thus transliteration with [ши] isn't faithful enough to the original pronunciation and [cи] is a better choice if for no other reason than proper transmission of softness. Although in my personal opinion [щи] would be even closer.
So although ideally 刺身 (さしみ) should have been spelled сасими, due to this spelling's not being widely and immediately associated with the dish in mass awareness English borrowing remains preferable.

actually the one I had wanted to eat myself
кстати, того самого, которого хотела было сама съесть

Actually isn't always an easy word to translate. Although it could be rendered as кстати, in the context of this sentence it sounds a little inconsistent, because actually here has a connotation of contrast to the expected state of affairs absent in кстати. In my view вообще-то / по правде говоря/сказать could do more justice to the original here.
Кстати, which introduces an aside remark, would be appropriate in phrases which simply provide new/additional information, e.g. которого я кстати тоже хотела съесть or которого я кстати поймала своими руками.

Likewise with regard to того самого, which comes immediately after its referent (the squid), while the distance between these two is expected to be greater, so that того самого does have effect of a reminder which is otherwise lost when the locution immediately follows the thing it's supposed to remind us about.

So considering the above said I would render the entire clause in a simpler way - которого я поначалу хотела сама съесть or которого я вообще-то хотела съесть сама. Поначалу and вообще-то don't go well together, that's why i had to choose.

I glanced in the mirror to see whether he was looking at me.
я глянула в зеркало (...), не смотрит ли он на меня.

Indirect questions usually require a verb in the main clause to which they relate through an interrogative word. In the English sentence such a verb is to see to which the indirect question is linked through the interrogative word what?-> to see what?, so ideally we'd need to have one in Russian as well.
Глянула (в зеркало) can't function as such a verb because the question что? can't be posed to it. The one which can is чтобы что? / зачем? / для чего? (glanced [in order] to do what? / why?), so another verb needs to be inserted in the interim. Possible candidates are узнать, проверить, выяснить (but not посмотреть or увидеть to avoid tautology and build-up of synonyms which is considered poor style in Russian), thus a fuller rendering would look like глянула в зеркало(чтобы что?)проверить(что?), не смотрит ли он на меня OR глянула в зеркало(why?), желая узнать(что?), не смотрит ли он на меня.
But since such construction is a bit clunky, it's permissible, especially in speech, to simplify it for the sake of brevity leaving the omitted part implied.

  1. At how many places in my Russian translation I utterly failed, leaving hints I am not a native speaker? Word choices, word sequence, and so on. I would be happy to receive frank criticisms.

In my opinion none. Flows totally natural. The above remarks don't detract from its quality because by and large they're immaterial.

13
  • Thank you so much for such a detailed answer, Bayan sensei. It is so inspiring and stimulating for me to read the wisdom of a native speaker. Your response gave me a lot of food for thought, and I find it very hard to resist asking a few questions. First, I am very much puzzled why раньше is wrong and поначалу is correct. Both words are adverbs. Could you shed some light on this?
    – Mitsuko
    Apr 29 '19 at 17:25
  • It is very interesting that you see было as a particle, not a verb. I was taught that this grammar form, хотела было, can be viewed as a separate tense, a kind of Russian Past Perfect (albeit not equivalent to the English Past Perfect). This is why I used it. The Poles, whose language is very similar to Russian, officially call the analogous form in their language, zrobił był, pre-past tense (czas zaprzeszły): fil.ug.edu.pl/strona/58259/zrobil_byl_jest_forma_poprawna . Do you see był as a particle, too? I saw хотела было as follows: было, что хотела. Was I utterly wrong?
    – Mitsuko
    Apr 29 '19 at 17:27
  • Also, Google suggests that the phrases "видел, как он убегал" and "видел, как он убегает" are equally common. Are both of them correct and meaning the same? If so, am I right in understanding that the rule for sequence of tenses in indirect questions depends on whether как or ли is used? And if yes, what is the underlying logic of this difference?
    – Mitsuko
    Apr 29 '19 at 17:30
  • @Mitsuko i guess the difference between раньше and поначалу may be likened to that between before, previously and at first in English... the first one refers to a distant past while the second simply gives a perspective about the order of actions, the preceding and the following... usage of раньше brings connotation of a distant past long preceding the time of the narrative and thereby simply making the phrase sound illogical, as if by that moment you have had that squid for a long time or had wished to eat it even before you had it at your disposal Apr 29 '19 at 17:50
  • @Mitsuko было in such constructions is classed as a particle in modern Russian grammar terminology, i believe it's because it lacks common verb features, it doesn't change being a fossilized remnant of Old Russian where it served the same purpose it once did in Polish, and although at some point it was a means of denoting pre-past time (plusquamperfect), not so in later Russian where scope of its use has shrunk to denotation of an incomplete/brief action in immediately preceding past Apr 30 '19 at 6:37
6

Напишу-ка я свой ответ на русском. Полагаю, Мицуко вполне сможет его прочесть и перевести. И, возможно, так будет даже полезнее.

Да, раз уж мы намерены "translate absolutely flawlessly and in the most natural way", я обещаю цепляться ко всему, что мне хотя бы чуть-чуть не понравится, то есть буду субъективен nec plus ultra.

Ну что ж, давайте по частям.

Я нарезала на сашими конвульсирующего извивающегося кальмара

Разумеется, причастие тут может быть как настоящего, так и прошедшего времени - это не ошибка. И со стилистической точки зрения настоящее время, пожалуй, даже несколько предпочтительнее: подобная картина может привлекать внимание читателя, и её стоит самую капельку подчеркнуть. Однако слово "конвульсирующего" меня, прямо говоря, фраппирует. Нет, это не "ошибка иностранца", просто... ну, гадкое оно какое-то и бестолковое. В общем, убрать и забыть как страшный сон.

кстати, того самого, которого хотела было сама съесть приготовить для себя

А вот кстати, того самого мне нравится. И, по-моему, это может быть очень даже кстати, прошу прощения за каламбур. Но проблема в том, что здесь подразумевается отсылка к чему-то, что уже было сказано прежде. То есть, если это предложение - часть бо́льшего текста, в котором недавно упоминалось, как героиня собиралась приготовить и скушать этого самого кальмара, то всё замечательно, а если нет - то увы, но придётся поменять. Однако мне приятнее думать, что это отрывок из какого-то рассказа, так что пусть остаётся как есть.

Что касается "хотела было", нет здесь для него контекста. Если б "хотела было съесть, да кто-то припёрся совсем некстати" - это одно, а так повисает оно в воздухе и ничегошеньки не делает. Опять же, не то чтобы ошибка, а просто не к месту. Почему нельзя посчитать это скрытой отсылкой, как и в случае "того самого"? Да на самом деле можно. Но "тот самый" - это такая "естественная ссылочная конструкция", а "хотела было" - нет. Напротив, этот своеобразный пережиток плюсквамперфекта настойчиво требует немедленного присутствия дальнейших пояснений. И их намеренный пропуск будет выглядеть весьма вычурно.

"Раньше хотела", а зачем здесь вообще слово "раньше"? Что такое важное оно добавляет к сказанному? Иногда надо быть проще: "хотела" и всё. Вполне достаточно.

"Хотела сама съесть". В этом порядке слов мне слышится что-то не совсем правильное, или, лучше сказать, не слишком изящное. Что-то разговорное и выбивающееся из стиля. Нужно ведь сделать немногое - переставить слово со смысловым ударением в конец и получить нужную паузу для продолжения. То есть "хотела съесть сама", или же "хотела приготовить для себя". В последнем варианте есть ещё и дополнительная привязка к предыдущей части предложения. Да, неточность перевода и всё такое, но мне вот почему-то хочется именно так.

и подала ожидавшему свою трапезу своё блюдо гостю

"Ожидавшему" или "ожидающему"? Тут, как и в первом случае, можно выбирать что больше нравится. Никаких серьёзных рекомендаций нет и быть не может, кроме разве что одной: для полной нейтральности прошедшее время стоит сохранить. Ожидал он себе и ожидал - дождался ведь уже. Что здесь действительно режет глаз, так это слово "трапеза". Оно довольно-таки необычное и плохо сочетается с обыденным приёмом пищи (нет, русские-то люди в целом нечасто рубают извивающихся кальмаров в сасими, но как раз в данном случае это должно выглядеть вполне ординарно).

Идя обратно, я глянула украдкой заглянула в зеркало проверить не смотрит ли он на меня.

"Смотрит" или "смотрел"? Во-первых, здесь должен быть ещё какой-нибудь глагол: "Я заглянула в зеркало, чтобы узнать смотрит он на меня или нет". Пропуск, в принципе, возможен, но он существенно усложняет понимание. Во-вторых, когда "цепочка" восстановлена, становится понятен естественный принцип согласования времён: "я проверяла, что он смотрит на меня в тот самый момент, когда я смотрю на него". То есть, мы один раз как бы "переключаемся" в прошлое, а дальше уже остаёмся в нём, как если бы оно стало вдруг настоящим. Но сравните: "я посмотрел записи камер, чтобы удостовериться, что он не выходил из дома" (то есть, записи я посмотрел, скажем, вчера и проверил, что он никуда не выходил позавчера и т.п.).

Что касается Вашего другого примера: "Он увидел рыбу, которая барахтается в воде". Здесь дело в том, что глагол совершенного вида весьма своеобразно сочетается с определительным предложением настоящего времени. Первое действие будет относиться к прошлому, а вот свойство станет вневременным / имманентным. А так как в воде могут барахтаться все рыбы без исключения, то и предложение перестаёт быть хоть сколько-нибудь осмысленным. Но сравните, например "он увидел рыбу, которая ползает по земле". В это уже есть кое-какой смысл, не правда ли?

At how many places in my Russian translation I utterly failed, leaving hints I am not a native speaker?

Явных ошибок у Вас нет. По крайней мере тех, которые выдают иностранца. Разумеется, при виде очередного "конвульсирующего кальмара" я сплюну и тихонечко матюкнусь себе под нос, но при этом буду думать, что переводчик - халтурщик, а не что переводчик - японец.

UPD.

If смотрит is correct and смотрел is wrong, why does Google show that the phrases "видел, как он убегает" and "видел, как он убегал" are equally common? Or is it the missing link - чтобы посмотреть - that requires choosing смотрит in my exercise?

Вы правы в том, что прошедшее время здесь всё-таки можно употреблять. Но при этом возможно небольшое изменение смысла. То есть: Идя обратно, я украдкой заглянула в зеркало проверить не смотрел ли он на меня - при желании это можно понять так, что даже если бы он смотрел на Вас, но за секунду до этого отвернулся, то Вы бы всё равно об этом догадались по единственному взгляду.

8
  • +1 К замене конвульсирующего (я бы еще предложил как вариант трепыхавшегося). Apr 30 '19 at 16:06
  • @Matt, thank you so much for this detailed response. It is very interesting and written in the real Russian language, not in the surrogate Russian language found in our university textbooks here. Your answer was such a pleasure to read. And I enjoyed the depth of your analysis and improvement suggestions. Поклон от меня, я очень признательна. I would like to react to a couple of things in your response.
    – Mitsuko
    Apr 30 '19 at 17:15
  • >> Иногда надо быть проще: "хотела" и всё. << Wouldn't then the sentence mean that my wish to eat the squid was there in the very process of slicing? This exercise is a part of a larger text, where the context is set: There were a few squids, and I particularly liked one of them and wanted to eat it myself. The text goes on to say that then a very valued customer came, and then I gave him the squid I had wanted to eat. Hence того самого and хотела было. Does my choice sound right in these circumstances?
    – Mitsuko
    Apr 30 '19 at 17:17
  • If смотрит is correct and смотрел is wrong, why does Google show that the phrases "видел, как он убегает" and "видел, как он убегал" are equally common? Or is it the missing link - чтобы посмотреть - that requires choosing смотрит in my exercise?
    – Mitsuko
    Apr 30 '19 at 17:19
  • @seven-phases-max почему трепыхавшегося, а не трепыхающегося?
    – Mitsuko
    Apr 30 '19 at 18:22

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.