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I want to say: "Let's work out together." There is a girl I see sometimes in the outdoor gym in the park I work out usually.

I helped her to adjust some of the equipment and now when she sees me she smiles and nods and sometimes watches me to work out and then does similar stuff.

Problem is, she speaks only Russian, so communication is a bit difficult. I want to ask her to work out together, it's more fun, and also more effective. Is it correct to say

Вы хотели бы потренироваться со мной?

15

Yes,

Вы хотели бы потренироваться со мной?

sounds ok. But it's

Would you like to work out with me?

While

Let's work out together.

сan be translated as:

Давайте потренируемся вместе.

Both variants are ok for the Russian speaker. And I wish you good luck ;)

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    Давай тренироваться вместе! – Alexander Farber May 14 at 11:38
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Before anything else I want to stress out that in my opinion if you don't speak language and have no intention to learn it to some extent, asking for a phrase just to address someone does not make much sense. As a monospeaker she still will answer in Russian and then what?

I'm not big fan of this borrowing, in fact I actually dislike it however the sad truth is that de-facto can be treated as borrowing, it's quite exotic but still you can see "воркаут" in the wild. Here are quotes from Russian newspapers:

  • Инвалид из Узловой мечтает о тренажерах для воркаута (link).
  • Здесь заменят покрытия пешеходных дорожек, обустроят велодорожки, установят площадку для воркаута, поставят сцену, лавочки (link).

Just like киллер is not exactly убийца or юзер is not exactly пользователь, воркаут is not exactly тренировка. Тренировка sounds more professional - it's like somebody preparing for competition, while "воркаут" has less sport connotations.

This is however about "воркаут" as a noun, there exist (in that sense that it de-facto used sometimes) a verb "воркаутить", however unlike the noun it's a part of only colloquial speech as of now.

So, apart from already suggested "потренирумеся вместе", if you want sound casual and, well, sort of young, you can say something like "может быть, будем воркаутить вместе?" - this is form personally I will never use but it doesn't mean in particular groups it used.

Other option would be to use the verb which stand for actual activity, like "может, будем вместе бегать?" or even "как вы смотрите на то, чтобы приходить заниматься в зал в одно и то же время?".

The last thing I want to add is "потренируемся" is more about a single act, like you are suggesting to do it once, this particular time.

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    The OP clearly speaks (some) Russian, as evidenced by providing a fairly decent first stab at a translation, so your comment about having "....no intention to learn..." is a bit uncalled for. – Zonker.in.Geneva May 13 at 20:52
  • Interesting thread. Where do you put the stress on воркаутить? – mjiap Sep 22 at 21:44
  • @mijap it's "ворка́утить" – shabunc Sep 25 at 15:06
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It is not a piece of cake though it can seem to be!

First, if you and this girl are not strangers but know each other on some level, it may be more appropriate to use the informal pronoun ты. Although Вы is still ok.

Second, (по)тренироваться is a little bit formal. A more colloquial verb is (по)заниматься; it may be not good just to say, 'Привет! Давай позанимаемся вместе?' for some reason but the problem is fixed easily. A perfect suggestion sounds like:

Привет! Давай позанимаемся на тренажёрах вместе?
('Hey! Let's work out together?')

This на тренажорах stands for 'with the help of the exercise machines'.

If you do not want to use на тренажёрах, then just say спортом 'sport':

Привет! Давай позанимаемся спортом вместе?
('Hey! Let's do some sport together?')

It is alright too.

All the aforementioned phrases with the formal pronoun Вы:

Здравствуйте! Давайте позанимаемся спортом вместе?
Здравствуйте! Давайте позанимаемся на тренажёрах вместе?

Although Привет! can be used here as well.

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