2

Is it grammatical to have multiple который clauses in a single sentence?

For example, if I have an English sentence like:

"I read a book that my friend recommended to me called 'Life'"

My instinct would be to do something like:

Я прочитал книгу, которую мой друг мне рекомендовал, которая называется "Жизнь".

Are sentences like that allowed in Russian?

I often want to add multiple clarification clauses, but I haven't come across examples using two который clauses in the wild yet.

  • 11
    "Вот два петуха, которые будят того пастуха, который бранится с коровницей строгою, которая доит корову безрогую, лягнувшую старого пса без хвоста, который за шиворот треплет кота, который пугает и ловит синицу, которая часто ворует пшеницу, которая в тёмном чулане хранится в доме, который построил Джек." – Headcrab Jun 25 at 13:36
  • Hah that's awesome! I googled where that's from -- looks like it's time to watch "дом который построил джек" – xgord Jun 25 at 14:19
  • 3
    @Headcrab: both который in the op's question refer to the book, it's not a chain like in the poem – Quassnoi Jun 25 at 14:28
  • @Quassnoi OK, how about this: "... кота, который пугает и ловит синицу, который умеет косплеить куницу, который весною играет в "Зарницу", который с ружьём охраняет границу..." - all the "который" are about the cat, but it still feels sort of legit. – Headcrab Jun 27 at 8:46
  • @Headcrab: rhymes and repetition are like sugar, they dumb down your taste of language. The original boils down to пёс, который треплет кота, который ловит синицу. Who is catching the bird, the dog or the cat? It kinda seems obvious in a long repetitive series, but that's the series which make it obvious, not the grammar. Your example кот, который ловит синицу, который играет в Зарницу has the same structure but the gender mismatch makes in unequivocal. – Quassnoi Jun 27 at 22:07
5

"I read a book that my friend recommended to me called 'Life'"

Я прочитал книгу, которую мой друг мне рекомендовал, которая называется "Жизнь"

Well, it is correct grammatically, but it sounds a bit awkward. A translator would have avoided the abundance of subordinate clauses.

Я прочитал книгу под названием «Жизнь», которую порекомендовал друг.

По совету друга я прочитал книгу, которая называется «Жизнь».

По совету друга я прочитал книгу (под названием) «Жизнь»

| improve this answer | |
4

Well, there's no police that will come for you in this particular situation in Russia, there's no language police at all after all, but this kind of combinations are highly unlikely in Russian without using "и", so it would sound more natural if it will be:

Я прочитал книгу, которую мой друг мне рекомендовал и которая называется "Жизнь".

Still, even in this form it sound slightly, don't know bookish compared to something like:

Я прочитал книгу, которую мой друг мне рекомендовал, [она] "Жизнь" называется.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.