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I cannot seem to grasp the meaning of 'Гостям стол, коням столб', more specifically in the context of someone saying they have to hurry and leave.

Does it have anything to do with being welcomed and looked after really well by someone, as in literally they have shared with your their table and given you, and/or whoever might accompany you, what you need? And does anything similar exist in English, maybe?

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    These days I might translate it something like Dinner table to the guests, parking space for their cars. – DK. Aug 1 '20 at 0:08
  • Why are you polluting your brain with some weird phrases that no one heard of ?? – monstro Aug 15 '20 at 13:35
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"Does it have anything to do with being welcomed" - it does have.

Anyhow, in a row of similar proverbs, nothing else is said. : "Хлебосольство ("Гость в дом, в доме Бог"; "Гостям стол, а коням столб", "Садись так гость будешь. Пришел - не стой: хозяина не томи") " https://cyberleninka.ru/article/n/formirovanie-etnicheskoy-identichnosti-v-protsesse-sotsializatsii-i-inkulturatsii/viewer

As for the someone who said and left, maybe he misunderstands this proverb. Or he takes himself for a horse ... A horse that has broken loose from the chain (by the leash). :)

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  • For some reason I remembered "Женщине(ам) цветы, детям мороженое" (flowers for womаn (women), ice-cream for kids) which is rather meme than proverb. Implying some stereotypical "to-do" assignment. Perhaps the leaving person was wishing others enjoy their stay by saying that proverb, it's indeed a misuse. – Swift Aug 13 '20 at 7:47
  • But as misuse it's a common one, at least among older generation. One of my mother's friends was saying that too as I remembered just now. That also got kind of comic effect. – Swift Aug 13 '20 at 8:00

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