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На Википедии (без указания источника) сказано:

Традиционно считается, что в русском языке данный тип эллипсиса отсутствует.

Я неоднократно слышал в разговорной речи выражение "если ещё не", напр.:

Обязательно сделай это, если ещё не [сделал это].

Разве это не является примером эллипсиса глагольной группы в русской разговорной речи?

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    ------ Будешь ? :> Aug 2 at 22:07
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    From my personal observation, it was almost unheard of some 30 years ago (except, perhaps, for the response "я уже" [сделал это]), but it's becoming more common, though still feels informal.
    – Zeus
    Aug 3 at 0:24
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Традиционно считается, что в русском языке данный тип эллипсиса отсутствует.

As was alluded to in the comments, this is not the case.

  • Я буду смотреть сериал, а он не будет.

is one example of what English linguistics calls the VP ellipsis.

Russian is not that big on auxiliary verbs as English is (see what I did here?). The VP ellipsis is less common in Russian, but it is there.

  • Обязательно сделай это, если ещё не [сделал это].

VP ellipsis elides non-finite verb forms and leaves their auxiliary verbs or particles in place. In your sentence a finite form is elided.

This would rather be an example of what English linguistics calls stripping.

This distinction is just not that important for the languages that do not rely on auxiliary verbs that much. Russian can elide non-finite forms too:

Она не любит есть суши, а я люблю.

would yield the VP ellipsis in English translation:

She does not like to eat sushi, and I like to.

, but since Russian is not using any auxiliary verbs in this phrase, this would still count as stripping.

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  • that is (since in russian there's one very common auxiliary verb - быть - used for future tense of non-finite forms), do you consider forms like "завтра ты сделаешь это! - не буду [делать это]!" vp ellipses?
    – whyer
    Aug 4 at 7:33
  • @whyer: I guess so. Again, this distinction is not that important for Russian.
    – Quassnoi
    Aug 4 at 11:30

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