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I am fully bilingual but for the life of me, I cannot think of how to tell my little one that we are having a "sleepover" in Russian. Help!

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    Мне кажется, что поскольку речь идёт о явлении не слишком распространённым на территории русскоговорящих стран, перевод заимствованием может быть вполне уместен для таких слов, как sleepover или playdate. Например, "У нас будет слиповер", или "Завтра будет плейдейт". Перевод толкованием окажется длиннее - всё равно как говорить "алфавитно-цифровое печатающее устройство" вместо "принтер". Sep 12 '13 at 18:35
  • @dasblinkenlight I think that for technical terms borrowing words could be a right way, but for "social" terms the Russian language has own resources. For instance the "sleepover" in English has old meaning "stay for the night" with extended meaning "after the party". I think Russian language potentially can also extend the meaning of "ночевка" the same way: "Пошли к Петровым на ночевку" (by the way it sounds similar to "тусовка").
    – Artemix
    Sep 13 '13 at 6:39
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    No one-word translation, but "(придти в гости и) остаться на ночь" sounds natural. Oct 26 '13 at 17:16
  • "Заночевать", например.
    – bipll
    Jun 9 '16 at 17:12
  • We need a definition of sleepover: an occasion on which one person (usually a child) invites one or more others to sleep at his house. The word comes from the phrasing of the invitation or request for permission: "Can John sleep over at my house?" In time the meaning shifted slightly until now it often means an overnight children's party with multiple guests.
    – David42
    Jun 29 '16 at 21:42
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Maybe сходить в гости с ночевкой?

In many similar cases ночевка is used to say that you are going to spend the night out of home:

Поехать на выходных на дачу с ночевкой

Поехать на пикник с ночевкой

Also, in online multitran.ru dictionary the following words are listed from the Vladimir Dal's dictionary:

переночеванье, переночевка.

Actually it would be much better if you provide the context where the word is used. Otherwise the final result has a chance to sound weird.

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    Context (quote): I cannot think of how to tell my little one that we are having a "sleepover" in Russian.
    – kemerover
    Sep 12 '13 at 15:04
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    @kemerover Without searching in dictionaries I could not tell what "sleepover" is. One of the dictionaries defines sleep over as "an instance of sleeping over, as at another person's house" or "a person who sleeps over". And "sleep over" is for example "проспать очень долго". As I am not so good at English the translation could be "мы с моей крошкой слишком долго спим (например в чужом доме)". Only second dictionary told me that "sleepover" is informal chiefly (US) an instance of spending the night at someone else's home.
    – Artemix
    Sep 12 '13 at 15:26
  • The best I have ever used is Google, really. I don't even remember last time when I opened tangible one. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleepover
    – kemerover
    Sep 12 '13 at 17:53
  • @Artemix "слишком долго спим" - to oversleep, not a sleepover (imho).
    – Vitaly
    Jun 10 '16 at 19:22
  • @Vitaly I was explaining how hard is to find the right meaning of a slang expression.
    – Artemix
    Jun 13 '16 at 7:29
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It's one of these words where the concept itself doesn't exist in Russia as a single word, like "curfew" or "to ground". You can say "Мама не пустит меня к тебе в гости с ночёвкой, я пришла вчера после полуночи" to express "I can't come to your sleepover, I came home past my curfew yesterday so mom grounded me" with reasonable precision, but there's no way to find a single noun that means "sleepover". You can say "это когда приходят в гости, заранее планируя, что останутся допоздна и там же заночуют", or "это время, до которого дети должны прийти домой, чтобы избежать наказания", since military curfew is "комендантский час", а completely different concept in Russian.

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There is also a word popular among students called вписка.

Mostly it means to go somewhere for the night, and it just means stay for the night, but as it is popular among students, then it normally also means a small party, drinking and the sleepover itself.

It is used in a sentence like this:

Мы едем на вписку (we are going on vpiska)

Впиши меня завтра к себе (can I sleep at your place tomorrow)

Маша устраивает вписку на выходных (Masha is inviting us for a sleepover)

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  • Well, mostly it means to go somewhere for the night, and it just means stay for the night, but as it is popular among students, then it normally also means a small party, drinking and the sleepover itself.
    – user2101
    Oct 18 '13 at 7:41
  • Do not see the edit button. Anyway, it is used in a sentence like this: we are going on vpiska(мы едем на вписку) или впиши меня завтра к себе(can I sleep at your place tomorrow) или Маша устраивает вписку на выходных( Masha is inviting us for a sleepover)
    – user2101
    Oct 18 '13 at 7:48
  • Do you have any thoughts why it is called like that (вписка)? Is it because a host (or someone else) has to make a list of guests?
    – Artemix
    Oct 18 '13 at 7:57
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    Всё ж таки вписка - это про другое.
    – shabunc
    Oct 18 '13 at 8:21
  • @Artemix I suggest the word "вписка" is related to person's registration institution aka "прописка". I see it like the host "temporarily registers" people coming to sleepover at his place, speaking figuratively.
    – alex.k
    Jul 3 '16 at 13:04
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Мы с дочкой говорим "переночёвка" и "поиграшка" (по аналогии с "переночёвка"). Переночёвка, кстати, вполне нормальное русское слово. Например: "Мама, можно мы пригласим Кейт на переночёвку?". Слово "поиграшка", наверное, менее удачное, но в нашем семейном языке прижилось. Мне нравится больше, чем "плейдейт".

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