4

I came across the word "грамота" in the following sentence:

Он открыл школы для обучения детей грамоте.

I'm trying to understand the structures in the sentence and analyze it, but I couldn't make out the case of "грамота" here, even though I understood the general meaning. I'd express the same sentence as:

Он открыл школы для обучения детей в области грамотности.

or

Он открыл школы для обучения грамоты детям.

Could you please explain the grammatical function of the word "грамота" here? I've checked Wiktionary and "to learn to read and write" and there, the structure is also translated as "учиться грамоте". Are my versions of the sentence correct and give the same meaning? Thanks!

3 Answers 3

9

Он открыл школы для обучения детей грамоте.

In this sentence, грамоте is an indirect object of the verbal noun обучение. It is in the dative case.

Он открыл школы для обучения детей в области грамотности.

This doesn't make much sense. "Грамотность" means "literacy level" or "educatedness", if you will. You can't teach in the area of a literacy level.

You could say "в области грамоты", but that would sound overly bureaucratic (канцелярит).

Он открыл школы для обучения грамоты детям.

That's just ungrammatical because it doesn't match the government pattern of обучение: обучение кого-то (genitive) чему-то (dative) - teaching someone something.

You're probably mixing it up with преподавание, which follows exactly that pattern: преподавание чего-то (genitive) кому-то (dative). So you could say:

Он открыл школы для преподавания грамоты детям.

It would sound okay — maybe a bit too pretentious, as we normally use преподавание to refer to teaching more serious subjects that are beyond basic literacy skills.

4

In this sense, грамота means "literacy" (in the wider sense of the English word as well, as in "basic skill in a domain"): компьютерная грамота, нотная грамота, финансовая грамота etc.

  • С.О.: Когда я стал осваивать литературоведческую грамоту, Лотман, Бахтин, формалисты были, конечно, уже изданы-переизданы. [Ольга Балла, Сергей Оробий. В поисках новой цельности // «Знание-сила», 2013]
  • Пацанчик ему тогда понравился: был он очень вдумчивый, старательный, учился на вечернем отделении в техникуме, любил чистоту и порядок, а технической грамотой овладевал с лету. [Борис Поздняков. Переходящее красное знамя // «Сибирские огни», 2012]
  • Он уже запал на одну шатенку на вечерах аргентинского танго, мысленно подобрал себе в сожительницы скуластую даму на курсах обучения компьютерной грамоте, но больше всех нравилась пучеглазому она — поэтесса. [Я. И. Грантс. Череп // «Волга», 2011]

This word comes from Greek γράμμα (γράμματος in the genitive), which means "that which is written" (letter, book, text etc). As such, it has several other meanings: "letter of commendation", "medieval Russian document", etc.

there the structure is also translated as "учиться грамоте"

Russian words meaning "to teach someone something" require the first object (the "someone") to be in the accusative, and the second object (the "something") to be in the dative.

In your proposed version: Он открыл школы для обучения грамоты детям the cases of the objects are mixed up.

1

Он открыл школы для обучения грамоты детям.

This is ungrammatical unless you mean teaching a pupil called "Literacy".

Он открыл школы для обучения детей в области грамотности.

"He opened schools to teach kids in the sphere of literacy." You can say that, but it'll sound just like the English sentence above... like not making kids be able to read and write, but making them knowledgeable about circumstances of literacy (literacy statistics by country and historical development, maybe). If you meant "sexual literacy", then this could work, though.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.