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Before I start, I want to point out that although I want to learn Russian, my current level is 0.

I recently saw the movie "The Deer Hunter" (Great movie). One of the characters is of russian ascendence, and in the beggining there is a wedding full of toasts, in them, they always say the same, which I could transcribe as:

наше здоровье

I guess that здоровье is neutral gender so they use наше. My question is if this is what is actually used. Reading the russian wikipedia page for toast (тост), I've seen that they use the second plural person, either:

ваше здоровье

or

за ваше здоровье

I just want to ask, given the fact that they're all gramatically correct (if I'm wrong in this point tell me), which one is really used as a standard sentence, which one is the one people use without thinking...

If using any person is normally seen, then I guess dedicating it to only one person "за твоë здоровье" would be correct too, wouldn't it?

Thanks.

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  • I would say, without thinking, people mostly say:<br /> Чёкнемся.
    – igoryonya
    Apr 30 '17 at 21:47
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Before I start, I want to point out that although I want to learn Russian, my current level is 0.

From your question, it seems your Russian is not at zero level :)

I guess that здоровье is neutral gender so they use наше.

Correct.

My question is if this is what is actually used.

I wouldn't know unless you could provide a link to the relevant part for us to hear.

I just want to ask, given the fact that they're all gramatically[sic] correct (if I'm wrong in this point tell me),

No, you're right, they're all grammatically correct.

which one is really used as a standard sentence, which one is the one people use without thinking...

All of the following are very common:

  • За Вас! (За тебя!)
  • Ваше здоровье! (Tвое здоровье!)
  • За ваше здоровье! (За твое здоровье!)

I can't say that (За) наше здоровье is very common, although can be perfectly valid in certain contexts.

if using any person is normally seen, then I guess dedicating it to only one person "за твоë здоровье" would be correct too, wouldn't it?

Correct. Moreover, when, for example, toasting a friend, not only is за твое здоровье correct too, but using the plural or the honorary may sound a bit awkward unless used for humorous effect.

Hope this helped.

[Update:] Indeed, you must have heard

На здоровье!

It is a set phrase and you shouldn't dissect it into its constituents. This is a foreign cliche of how Russians toast. I have never heard anyone toast with this phrase, although I have been told by native speakers that this is indeed sometimes used. Comments under this answer do not agree. Therefore, because it is debatable, it's best to avoid using this phrase for toasting.

This phrase has another meaning and is often used when saying "you're welcome" after being thanked for a meal/drink.

Спасибо за пирожки!

На здоровье!

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    @Armen: Personally I've never heard that. За здоровье is widely used, but not на здоровье.
    – jwalker
    Oct 14 '13 at 22:00
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    @MyUserIsThis: The wedding in the film. The "Russian" cliches in American movies are beard, vodka, nazdrovia and Ashkenazi music. Well, vodka may be a correct one :)
    – jwalker
    Oct 14 '13 at 23:02
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    @MyUserIsThis Though Armen says that "на здоровье" is a valid toast, most of the people I know (including myself) will think that it comes from American movies about Russians. So I would strongly recommend a foreigner to avoid using this toast. Use "За ваше/наше/твое здоровье" instead.
    – Artemix
    Oct 15 '13 at 9:15
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    @jwalker Not being american, I'm pretty aware of how cliches are absolutely wrong... That actually was one of the reasons to make this quetion. Oct 15 '13 at 9:47
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    @Artemix, MyUserIsThis: I edited to warn against using на здоровье for toasting. Oct 15 '13 at 9:53
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На здоровье! used all the time when toasting. I just double checked with my Russian wife and her Russian girlfriend and they confirm it is not just Americans who use На здоровье!

when saying "you're welcome" after being thanked for a meal/drink - Again from my experience in St Petersburg, most people say 'пожалуйста' for you're welcome, but it is possible to use 'На здоровье' (although I have not heard very often)

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    Disagree. "На здоровье!" as a toast is possible only as a joke. Please check the comments above. Probably you wife meant "За здоровье!".
    – TT_
    Jan 7 '14 at 15:17

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