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In a dialogue from Langenscheidt's Praktisches Lehrbuch Russisch guests are greeted with "Проходите", translated as "Come in" ("Kommt herein").
Is that usual in contemporary Russian for telling someone to come in?
Dictionaries seem to translate "Проходить" as "to move on", "to pass", etc.

  • It's a colloquial way to say "come in". – Oskar K. Jun 22 '14 at 15:57
8

Проходите literally means 'come through'; it is primarily used in situations where you pass the object you are invited to go through quickly (say, airport metal detectors). It could be used to mean 'come in' - like the situation @Artemix described in the other answer (in the case with дом, the 'object to come through' could be a corridor or a hallway), however 'заходите' or 'входите' sound more natural to me.

8

Yes, проходите can be used to say "come in". It is short form for "проходите в дом". Usually when you visit an official person (or a person in an office, or a doctor) you'll have the following dialogue:

-- К вам можно?
-- Да, проходите, садитесь.

― Да-да, входите, Тамара Владиславовна, ― изображая дружелюбие, закивал Глебский. ― Проходите, садитесь. [Петр Акимов. Плата за страх (2000)]

Also a policeman can say "пройдемте" which is short version of "пройдемте со мной в отделение милиции".


In fact Словарь Ефремовой lists 14 different meanings of the word проходить, including the one Eugene mentions.

  • 2
    Проходите literally means 'come through'; it is primarily used in situations where you pass the object you are invited to go through quickly (say, airport metal detectors). It could be used to mean 'come in' - like the situation you described, however 'заходите' or 'входите' sound more natural to me. – Eugene A May 29 '14 at 12:42
  • I find your and Eugene's answers equally satisfactory (thanks to both!), but since Eugene's reputation is so far below your stellar one, I will accept Eugene's. – Georges Elencwajg May 29 '14 at 17:10
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Has a weak polite scent, translated as "Come in" in this particular case. But Проходите мимо will be Pass by, for sure. Also, can even be translated as Take your seats (Займите места). Depends on situation and voice intonation. Merely, it is used to tell a person to move where he is mostly expected to go. For example, if a fireman officer tells you Проходите, he really means Don't stop there! But if you tell your girlfriend Проходи kindly, then you definitely mean You are welcome, darling.

-1

It can be translated as come in. Literally, it means: come through. Come through is used, not "when you visit an official person", as was stated in one of the posts, but it just means as you are passing through the doorway.

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