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I saw this use of the participle стоящий in the following passage and wondered it if common or even correct, since it so closely follows English syntax and somehow doesn't "feel" Russian to me for several reasons, least of which is the fact that I always thought participles in apposition to preceding nouns are always set off by a comma.

После того как она сказала, что не помнит меня стоящего в очереди перед ней, я предложил решить это с помощью монеты.

When she said that she didn't remember me being ahead of her in the line, I suggested we toss a coin for it.

If this is correct, how productive is the pattern? Can it be used with any verb? For example, by analogy, ¿could one say:

Я не помню тебя работающего со мной в Москве.

I don't remember you working with me in Moscow.

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    "я предложил решить это с помощью монеты" тоже не совсем по-русски звучит. Очень похоже что это перевод с другого языка (английского?). – Artemix Nov 21 '14 at 14:47
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I don't remember you working with me in Moscow.

In this case you can only use:

Я не помню, чтобы ты работал со мной в Москве.

or

Я не помню, что ты работал со мной в Москве.

Former means more negative attitude (statement that you did not work with me). The later means just that I do not remember.

This can be better illustrated if we omit the negative particle.

Я помню тебя работающего со мной в Москве. = I remember you when you were working in Moscow. I remember the expression on your face and how you were looking then and how you looked and behaved overall and how you dressed, and what were you habits, your character and overall what a man you were at the time. Note, this implyes that you became different since then! Example: Я помню тебя работающего со мной в Москве, ты тогда был очень весёлым и одевался очень стильно.

Я помню тебя работающим со мной в Москве. = I remember the exact moment when you were working, when performing a task, doing a job exactly in the process. Example: Я помню тебя только работающим. Ты вообще когда-нибудь отдыхал, когда был в Москве?

Я помню, что ты работал со мной в Москве. = I remember the fact that you worked with me in Moscow, and nothing more.

Я помню, как ты работал со мной в Москве. = I remember you working with me in Moscow (I remember you day-by-day and common tasks we were doing and what we accomplished together)

So you can see that if you say "Я не помню тебя работающего со мной в Москве." the meaning would different from what you intend. It would mean "I do not remember what a person you were when you were working with me in Moscow, your face, your mood etc."

Ты говоришь, что ты тогда был очень веселым. Возможно, но я не помню тебя работающего в Москве. = You said you were very joyful at the time. Maybe, but I do not remember you when you were working with me in Moscow.

Maybe I remember the fact, but no your look in the process. For instance you can say:

Я помню, что ты работал со мной в Москве, но тебя работающего не помню. = I remember that you worked with me in Moscow, but I haven't meet you at workplace.

Compare:

Я помню, что ты работал со мной в Москве, но тебя работающим не помню. = I remember that you worked with me in Moscow, maybe I saw you at workplace, but I haven't seen you working, performing the tasks (rather than talking, joking, entertaining yourself).

By the way, if you add a comma you come to a completely different meaning:

Я не помню тебя, работающего со мной в Москве = I do not remember you, who is working with me in Moscow.

  • Very effective approach without the negative particle. Thank you for clarifying. – CocoPop Nov 21 '14 at 16:00
  • @Anixx I am pretty sure that "Я не помню, что ты работал со мной в Москве" implies that you know that a person worked with you (from indirect sources) but forgot. Come to think of it, the sentence makes no sense: if you still do not remember the fact, how come you are talking about it. If you come to know the fact from indirect sources, it is classified as the fact already known, thus not yet forgotten. Sort of similar to "I do not know that the keys are under the fridge": a grammatically correct nbut meaningless sentence. – Shady_arc Nov 21 '14 at 18:07
  • @Anixx OK. Probably just not used in Moscow that way. – Shady_arc Nov 21 '14 at 18:51
  • @Anixx Same here :) In my language in means nothing. – Shady_arc Nov 21 '14 at 18:57
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I think this should be used with a comma:

После того как она сказала, что не помнит меня**,** стоящего в очереди перед ней...

Grammatically correct would be:

После того как она сказала, что не помнит меня стоящим в очереди перед ней...

Or:

После того как она сказала, что не помнит, чтобы я стоял в очереди перед ней...

  • No, no comma is needed here. = Я не помню тебя подстриженного, я не помню тебя прыгающего и т.д. – Anixx Nov 21 '14 at 15:29
  • @Anixx Yup. It surprised me to find a sub-rule for that type of sentence exactly, which is amazing since it can hardly even be justified in modern language. I guess, that's backward compatibility. – Shady_arc Nov 21 '14 at 17:50
  • @Shady_arc you can add a comma actually but you change the meaning totally. Compare: Я не помню тебя такого красивого, как на фото vs Я не помню тебя, такого красивого. – Anixx Nov 21 '14 at 17:55
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You will probably be understood, but, yep — just as you think, this pattern sounds funny to a modern speaker. I am not sure it was ever used.

Rather than say Я не помню тебя работающего(работающим) со мной в Москве. a native speaker would use Я не помню, чтобы ты работал со мной в Москве.

The participle pattern is used when you refer to perceiving a person who was doing some action:

Я увидел человека, стоящего на углу = I saw a man (who was) standing at the corner. (→ probably there were other people but you are talking about the one who was at the corner)

But it is not used to refer to the action that was being performed. That's why it sounds weird: a pronoun is understood as a reference to one and one possible object only (aka antecedent). There is no "me being ahead" and some other "me doing homework".

Finally, I am not sure it is incorrect per se, but definitely not common other than when used exactly to sound funny/foreign. The most correct interpretation of "не помнит меня стоящего в очереди перед ней" would be "does not remeber me (who were ahead of here in the line)" . However, since the past tense used in modern Russian was essentially a past participle in Old East Slavic, there is a chance such wording could have been in use (which would have been a thousand years ago anyway).

UPD: I looked it up. This structure is grammatical but archaic. It is found in literature (especially a century and more old). Not so much in real life. So it makes no sense to use it unless you specifically aim for an arhaic feel and are ready to supply you writing with appropriate vocabulary, too.

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Я запомнил её сидящей у окна с чашкой чая в руке would sound distinctly "literary" but entirely grammatically correct.

The example in the question is indeed not correct. In fact, it does look like a poor quality translation from English made by someone whose Russian is wanting.

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