3

How to say in Russian "I have a quick question for you Irina"?

3
  • 1
    How a question can be quick? – Anixx Dec 17 '14 at 6:53
  • @Annix maybe it's slang. Have you seen this term at Urban Dictionary? – naXa Dec 17 '14 at 6:55
  • 2
    @Anixx it's a colloquial English term used quite often. – shabunc Dec 17 '14 at 10:16
7

У меня есть небольшой вопрос к Вам, Ирина.

5

To me quick question is маленький вопрос. Or not so neutral вопросик.

5
  • Т.е. "маленький вопросик". – Artemix Dec 17 '14 at 8:10
  • 4
    "Маленький вопросик" -- это чудовищно. – Francis Drake Dec 18 '14 at 15:35
  • Можно и маленький вопросик, но это еще менее нейтрально. Не поясните, почему "чудовищно"? – jwalker Dec 19 '14 at 11:20
  • "вопросик" сам по себе - это не "небольшой вопрос". Обычно это такая "усюсюкающая" форма вежливости: "приобретаем билетики!" (кондуктор), "сейчас мы вам оформим путевочку" (в турфирме), "мы получили вашу заявочку", "доставим вашу посылочку" и т.п. – Artemix Dec 23 '14 at 14:49
  • @Artemix Не высокий штиль, конечно, но встречается повсеместно, и это надо учитывать. – jwalker Dec 24 '14 at 13:47
3

I generally agree with @naXa, but from my point of view, it would be better to say

Ирина, у меня к Вам небольшой вопрос.

or

У меня есть к Вам небольшой вопрос, Ирина.
1

Ирина, у меня к Вам небольшой вопрос.

Такой вариант более предпочтительный) Хотя можно так и так спрашивать.

1

if quick question is "A question that usually requires a long answer. A close relative of stupid question and rhetorical question" you could just ask with небольшой вопрос, use ironic inflecsion.

2
1

a quick question = короткий вопрос

It's better to use 'Ирина, у меня к Вам короткий вопрос, (когда вы пойдете на концерт сегодня? - Мы не пойдем.)'

'Короткий' means that we are expecting a 'короткий' (short [in time] = quick) answer as well.

'Ирина, у меня к Вам небольшой вопрос' is closer to "I have a short question for you Irina" (short to ask, but not necessary short to answer).

And keep in mind that in Russian 'небольшой вопрос' could be more than just a question, it could be a request to do something: 'Ирина, у меня к вам небольшой вопрос, не могли бы вы выйти на работу в воскресенье?"

Update. If you and Irina are on different levels of a hierarchy in that case the most likely meaning of 'небольшой вопрос' is 'a small business': if Irina is on a higher level - she will expect a request to do a favor ('Ирина, у меня к Вам небольшой вопрос. Я принес заявление на отпуск в июле, не могли бы вы его рассмотреть и одобрить сегодня? - Хорошо, оставьте у секретаря, и подходите после шести, тогда мы рассмотримм ваш вопрос.)', if she is on a lower level - an errand will be expected (less common). I guess that ritual came from soviet bureaucracy (newspeak): 'Товарищи, вы по какому вопросу?' (what business brings you here?) On the same level of hierarchy (or no hierarchy) you could be straightforward "I have a small business for you Irina".

Update 2:

'Quick question' is a colloquial English term. According to Urban Dictionary it is a question that usually requires a long answer.

@naXa: I vote for your example:

I.e. using a common expression: всё хорошо, только у меня к Вам один маааленький вопрос: ... (with a snide; the asker knows that his question can't be easily answered)

9
  • I wouldn't say that using "небольшой вопрос" as a request is that common. Going with "короткий вопрос" seems indeed the best course of action. – Francis Drake Dec 18 '14 at 15:37
  • 'Quick question' is a colloquial English term. According to Urban Dictionary it is a question that usually requires a long answer, it's a close relative of stupid question and rhetorical question. I don't know of any equivalent term in Russian. But I've imagined a few situations where such phrase may be used, and concluded that in Russian you can say it correctly by means of a logical stress. – naXa Dec 19 '14 at 6:25
  • I.e. using a common expression: всё хорошо, только у меня к Вам один маааленький вопрос: ... (with a snide; the asker knows that his question can't be easily answered) or у меня небольшой вопрос: ... (with a usual stress; the asker is clueless and doesn't know he is asking a stupid question). – naXa Dec 19 '14 at 6:25
  • 1
    @naXa See english.stackexchange.com/a/91455/57663 – jwalker Dec 19 '14 at 11:07
  • 2
    @naXa The criteria are what constitutes the SO: voting, rating, moderation, and discussion. I kindly disagree on "the same definition": to me usually requires a long answer is different from expects the answer to also be quick. – jwalker Dec 19 '14 at 13:10
1

Ирина, у меня к вам небольшой вопрос. - More neutral

Ирина, у меня к вам вопросик. - More informal

DO NOT put the name at the end of the sentence. It's not grammatically wrong, but we never, never do that, so it'll be a dead giveaway that you're not a native speaker.

DO NOT use 'короткий вопрос'. Same as the previous one, we just don't use it like that. Ever.

You can leave out the name altogether. In Russian it's not natural to call a person by their name all the time. If you're talking to someone, just look at them, and they'll know you're talking to them and not a nearby wall. No need to call their name unnecessarily. Honestly, it's annoying and feels like you can't remember the person's name and have to repeat it all the time. If you're trying to catch a person's attention, it's fine to call their name, but, please, don't repeat it all the time.

So, if you're already talking to that Irina, you can say just:

У меня (к вам) (небольшой) вопрос. or У меня (к вам) вопросик.

You can easily leave out the parts in brackets. In Russian it's natural to leave out a lot of things if they can be read from context, and in this case it's: 1) already obvious that you have a question for Irina, because you're talking to her, so there's no need to use 'к вам'; 2) it's not really necessary to specify that the question is short unless Irina is really short on time.

Actually, you can also leave out 'у меня', because it's obvious that it's you who has the question. Which leaves...

Вопрос. or Вопросик. But these two are rather informal.

4
  • "вопросик" сам по себе - это не "небольшой вопрос". Обычно это такая "усюсюкающая" форма вежливости: "приобретаем билетики!" (кондуктор), "сейчас мы вам оформим путевочку" (в турфирме), "мы получили вашу заявочку", "доставим вашу посылочку" и т.п. – Artemix Dec 23 '14 at 14:42
  • @Artemix А кто говорил, что это не так? И, вообще-то, "усюсюкающая" форма называется "уменьшительно-ласкательная". – Kaworu Dec 24 '14 at 5:45
  • Я хочу сказать что здесь будет путаница между смыслом "я хочу задать вопрос который не займет у вас много времени" (a quick question) и "я хочу максимально вежливо задать вам вопрос чтобы не причинить вам неудобства" ("вопросик"). – Artemix Dec 24 '14 at 8:11
  • Так "вопросик" может использоваться в обоих случаях. Она на то и уменьшительно-ласкательная, чтобы в том числе "уменьшать", т.е. "вопрос, который не займет много времени" тоже может быть "вопросик". Кроме того, "вопросик" может использоваться и в третьем значении, о котором писали в других ответах - в качестве иронии, когда спрашивающий знает, что на его "вопросик" так просто не ответишь. – Kaworu Dec 24 '14 at 8:18
1

Depends on the degree of the familiarity with the interlocutor. Clearly, ты or Вы. A version for a small talk between friends: "А ну-ка, Ирина, ответь мне по-быстрому" (coll.)

1
  • Use this with caution, because in wrong context it Ирина may feel this as insult. – Artemix Jan 12 '15 at 8:12

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.