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So, I understand what passive voice is, but how would would use it in the past. For example (this is a horrible example by the way): Книга читается женщиной. But, how would this be made past tense? Would it be "Книга читалась женщиной", or is that completely wrong?

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    Yes, it is correct grammatically, although this particular sentence sounds awkward. Another example: Этот замок возводился лучшими строителями страны – Vilmar Jan 23 '15 at 7:48
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From a point of view of grammar it is totally fine.

It's just that this particular example sounds weird to a native speaker. It is generally better to use active voice here: "Женщина читала книгу"

There are examples where you can use читаться so it would sound fine:

  1. When you're speaking about reading data in electronic devices. Данные на флешке не читаются (не читались) на этом устройстве(этим устройством). "Data on this USB-flash drive are not read/cannot be read (could not be read) on this device"
  2. When you say something like "not feeling like". Like when you pick a book in the evening after a hard day and say: "что-то мне не читается". I don't feel like reading.

Maybe there are more, can't remember right now.

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    More examples where passive voice sounds natural: насколько я помню, книга читалась легко (the book was easy to read); эта буква не читается (this letter is not pronounced) – J-mster Jan 24 '15 at 12:15
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That's correct (though it is an awkward sentence). The past tense of reflexive verbs is formed the same way as non-reflexive verbs. For example, consider двигать 'move sth' past tense двигал(а,о,и) and its reflexive counterpart двигаться 'move (oneself)' past tense двигался двигалась двигалось двигались.

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Formally, the reflexive verbs have no distinction from the non-reflexive ones in their forms when they decline in person, gender, tense, etc. You have everything correct, do not worry.

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