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My Belarusian friend said a such phrase: хуйбудешь, He said that it was a joke, but could you please explain what he meant?

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    Was it an answer to a question? A proposition? Please, provide the context, otherwise it cannot be translated. – Yellow Sky Jan 28 '15 at 0:13
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On its own with no context, it sounds like a reaction to an earlier statement: "The hell you'll be!" (or possibly "The hell you will!"), but it could be something entirely different. For example, there's a phenomenon similar to shm-reduplication whereby a word's entire sequence of sounds before its stressed vowel is changed to хуй-, to express annoyed or even aggressive dismissal. It can also be used on its own with a word said by another speaker, e.g. «Бинго!» — «Хуинго!» If that's the case here, though, it's rather hard to figure out what the original word was.

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    Other examples: Мамба-хуямба, - Как ты догадался? - Я умный! - Хуюмный блять! – ttaaoossuu Feb 19 '15 at 16:22
1

I think your friend would like to say: you can't repeat. Meaning unbelievable or unrepeatable

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Proposing dick (хуй) often means negation or condemnation. But you friend wrote two words "хуй" (dick) and "будешь" (will) concatenated. So this he probably constructed new word in joke. Russian language is inflectional, i.e. we can construct and modify words from parts. So we can add profanity parts to other words to sound more brutal.

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1

There's little joke rhyme:

У меня к тебе дело есть: Хуй сварился, будешь есть

Sometimes people make pause when speaking first line to joke when someone replies. Probably it's simplified/similar version.

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This means that he suggests you to suck his penis. In full it would be "хуй будешь [сосать]?"

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    I am native Russian-speaker and I can say that you aren't right. – Alexander Perechnev Jan 28 '15 at 12:20
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    Well, it is one of many possible interpretations, and the guy could mean it, but without more context I wouldn't suggest this version as the most likely one. – Eugenia Vlasova Jan 28 '15 at 17:25

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