7

I was searching for the ways to use this expression in Russian.
I couldn't find any Russian expression so I had to use Google translate.

However, I don't know if these sound natural or if these are what Russians would say.

Don't let it ruin your day.
Не позволяйте испортить вам день.

Don't let her ruin your day.
Не давайте ей испортить вам день.

Do they sound natural ?

Could I say

Не позволяйте ей испортить вам день.

EDIT

So, if none of the above expressions is natural, what expression can I use ?

Also, is it a general rule to use the perfective aspect after позволяйте ?

  • 1
    If you want to see whether a particular opinion (sound/doesn't) is true, you might try search Google Books, varaint: "позволяйте" "испортить" — just do not rely entirely on opinion )) – Avtokod Jun 13 '15 at 13:20
2

In short: as a native Russian speaker I can say that all three variants provided by you will do. They all sound natural to me.

Also, is it a general rule to use the perfective aspect after позволяйте ?

No. The diffrernce is in details:

Не позволяйте ей испортить Вам день

Literally: "Don't let her make your day ruined"

Не позволяйте ей портить Вам день

Literally: "Don't let her [constantly] ruining your day" (assumed that she will be making constant attempts to ruin your day again and again)

I suppose that the sentence "to ruin one's day" might be borrowed from American culture, but nowadays using it is Ok.

| improve this answer | |
3

The main problem is that any exact Russian translation would sound a bit awkward here. Whether it would be "не позволяйте" or "не дайте" but in a true spoken language people try to avoid such lengthy and dull sentences. So a native Russian speaker would choose here something like "Да плюнь ты на это" or "Да не бери в голову" etc.etc.

| improve this answer | |
1

The dative вам is nicely idiomatic, but it's more common to say испортить вам настроение. I'm not saying what you have isn't natural enough, but somehow things like испортить вечер or испортить праздник register as authentic while испортить день, at least when you know it's a translation of an English idiom, feels like just that, a translation.

| improve this answer | |
  • Nikolay,испортить вечер,испортить вам настроение,испортить праздник though these are synonyms, but still there is slight difference between them. And as a native speaker, I would not say that it is an English translation. More over, this phrase sounds quite natural in Russian. – Серж Jun 13 '15 at 11:32
  • 2
    @Серж I insist that испортить день isn't something that a native speaker would spontaneously say. And that in my view trumps whether it's a passable, "natural" enough translation (which I admit it is). – Nikolay Ershov Jun 13 '15 at 13:31
  • Николай, что необычного во фразе ''испортить день''? Почему вы считаете, что это калька с английского и на чем основаны ваши убеждения? Это обыкновенное выражение, которое можно встретить в повседневной речи. – Серж Jun 13 '15 at 17:57
  • 1
    @Серж В нем нет ничего необычного. И все же есть некая идиоматическая новизна. Человеку вряд ли придет в голову так сказать, когда есть вариант "испортить настроение". – Nikolay Ershov Jun 14 '15 at 1:28
  • 3
    В Национальном корпусе находится с десяток примеров "испорченных дней". В среднем раз в 10 лет кто-нибудь что-то подобное пишет. Явно не слишком частое в языке выражение. – Artemix Jun 17 '15 at 9:47
0

There's no such thing in Russian as ruin the day (портить день), but there's a good phrase пропал день (the day is lost)

PS
Or use ruin the evening (портить вечер). But it means entertainment

| improve this answer | |
0

Not quite natural to me, just because quite unusual. Right as Nikolay Ershov’s answer says.
I feel that another thing which has a tint of uncommonness is the non-unity of aspects of verbs. I would rather expect:
Не дайте … испортить…
Не давайте … портить… (Though позволяйте in the last clause seems more probable to me I cannot see why; possibly because дайте (compared with позволяйте) is a more sharp word which is more appropriate for more definite ‘perfective’ situations (compared with ‘imperfective’ situations).)
But any combination of aspects is possible depending on the meaning aspects a sayer wants to express. (I will not discuss the difference between aspects here; it is another topic — answered.)

Possible translations could use отравить instead of испортить:
Не дайте [ей] отравить вам день.
And again, I don’t claim it’s an everyday Russian expression.
Another possible verb: изгадить, though it’s somewhat rough.


A Russian variant could be:

Не стоит огорчаться. Though a literal meaning differs (it’s not worth being upset).

There is an idiomatic выбить из колеи (literally ‘to knock out of a rut’ i. e. out of one’s life course) but
Не дай себя выбить из колеи is not a usual Russian oral phrase.

The slang has more phrases for it. (But all of them, and non-slang variants too, are not about 'day-not-to-be-ruined')


upd: Concerning the claims that phrases of the type позволить … испортить день are pretty Russian: I have never, not once, said/written/heard those phrases in Russian for 40 years of my life before this post, with the only possible (not that I really remember the cases) exception: movies unperfect translations.

| improve this answer | |
0

Yes, but we should see the context. "Испортить день" - фраза, которая чаще использовалась в переводах иностранных фильмов на русский язык. Используется в обычной речи, но не так часто. Использование "Не дайте испортить ваш день" или "Не позволяйте испортить ваш день", или "Не давайте испортить ваш день" зависит исключительно от общего текста, т.е. от стилистики, динамики речи. В общем, берется то, что будет в данном тексте выглядеть лучше.

Хотя вот "не давайте испортить" по-русски все-таки немного некрасиво звучит.

| improve this answer | |
  • И оно именно что калька с английского. Раньше так не говорили, но мы же тоже испытываем воздействие на себя. – Brego Jun 18 '15 at 12:26
  • Hi and welcome to Russian.SE! Usually we expect more extensive answers. Could you please elaborate on yours a little bit? – Quassnoi Jun 18 '15 at 12:51
  • Hi. Can I answer in russian? "Испортить день" - фраза, которая чаще использовалась в переводах иностранных фильмов на русский язык. Используется в обычной речи, но не так часто. Использование "Не дайте испортить ваш день" или "Не позволяйте испортить ваш день", или "Не давайте испортить ваш день" зависит исключительно от общего текста, т.е. от стилистики, динамики речи. В общем, берется то, что будет в данном тексте выглядеть лучше. – Brego Jun 18 '15 at 14:28
  • Хотя вот "не давайте испортить" по-русски все-таки немного некрасиво звучит. – Brego Jun 18 '15 at 14:32
  • Yes you can answer in Russian, though this site is aimed at non native speakers so English is preferred. Could you please update your answer with your comments? Thanks! – Quassnoi Jun 18 '15 at 14:40

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.