Questions tagged [глаголы]

Questions about verbs, both finite and non-finite forms such as infinitives, gerunds, participles. The tag covers formation, derivation, functions, usage and meaning of verbs.

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3
votes
5answers
239 views

What is the difference between "Куда ты идёшь?" and "Куда ты собрался?"

I recently learned that Куда ты собрался? usually gets translated as Where are you going? Or, at least it does on Reverso. This raised at least a couple of questions for me. The first is the ...
3
votes
4answers
181 views

What is the difference between "разделить" and "поделить"?

Both of these words came up on a word list for me to study and I have no idea when to use which. I looked them up on Wiktionary and discovered that they are both perfective. I then ran them through ...
3
votes
3answers
273 views

What verbs require that the experiencer be in the dative case?

I recently learned the verb нуждаться (to need), and noticed that to say I need something, one would say мне нужно ..., so I is in dative case. So how come for this verb, the speaker is in Dative case?...
10
votes
8answers
6k views

Do Russians really use "Расход!" to say, "Let's go!"?

I was watching an episode of Better Than Us" (Лучше, чем люди) in Russian with English subtitles. Since I was actively watching, to the extent of making a vocabulary list from it, I noticed that ...
1
vote
0answers
69 views

What is the difference between ехать and поехать [duplicate]

I understand they both mean to go (by vehicle) but I can't get the difference in my head. Can someone provide English examples, please
12
votes
3answers
1k views

Why does she say "Я понимаешь" and not "Я понимаю"?

I've heard people say "понимаешь" when they clearly intend to mean "I understand", such as in this line from the Serebro song Не Время: Я понимаешь, я это чувствую потом мы всё ...
2
votes
1answer
185 views

звонить в школу vs звонить школе?

I found the following sentence: Моя мама позвонила в школу. According to my dictionary, звонить/позвонить takes either dative, or в + accusative. However, I'm not sure when to use it over the other. ...
0
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1answer
120 views

Are there perfective verbs that only accept perfective infinitives?

The following perfective verbs are said to only accept perfective infinitives. забыть - to forget успеть - to manage, have time удаться - to manage, succeed суметь - to be able to manage получиться - ...
2
votes
2answers
126 views

Verb aspect is listed as being different or both

For the verb живописать (to describe vividly) Wiktionary [en] lists it as imperfective; the [ru] Wiktionary lists it as perfective; while a database of verbs I has lists it as 'both'. The database ...
1
vote
1answer
125 views

Difference between imperfective (Будет) and perfective future verbs

It seems to me that the difference between the imperfective and perfective future tense of verbs is that the imperfective refers to a general or uncompleted action; while the perfective refers to a ...
4
votes
1answer
203 views

Which verbs prefer the по-...-ски format?

I have in my notes that the format по-...-ски is required over на ...-ком succeeding the verbs - говарить, читать, писать, понимать & думать. This rule is discussed somewhat here. However, using a ...
1
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2answers
100 views

Dictionary listing case for verbs

Is there a dictionary that lists the case that precedes, succeeds verbs? For example идти (accusative) - Я хочу идти в Россию; быть (past, instrumental) - Я был собакой.
5
votes
2answers
224 views

Using the future in the meaning of 'would'

So recently I was looking up some sentences on reverso.net, and I noticed that most of the translations of 'would' would most often use the compound or perfective future. I asked some Russian friends ...
-1
votes
3answers
151 views

Is there a present tense verb form for 'should' that is a true verb form and not an adjective and that can be used with a noun in the nominative?

The normal way to express the idea of present tense obligation in Russian is with должен. If one wanted to say 'he should speak', one could say 'он должен сказать'. But должен (and other options, ...
3
votes
2answers
129 views

"Reading up" on а subject

I would like to know the conventional and/or colloquial way in Russian to express that one is reading up on a subject. In English, to read up on/about something means to inform oneself about a ...
12
votes
10answers
4k views

What's the difference between "люблю" and "обожаю"?

I was doing a Clozemaster exercise and it asked to translate "I love reading" to Russian. I thought of putting Люблю читать but the correct answer that the exercise wanted was Обожаю читать. What's ...
10
votes
6answers
2k views

The usage of иметь

Possession is generally expressed in Russian using у + genitive case. However, in technical contexts the verb иметь is used, e.g., это уравнение имеет решение or этот многочлен имеет один корень. I ...
2
votes
2answers
200 views

Questions about "бежать" and "побежать"

I know that the difference between бегать and побегать is that бегать is imperfective while побегать is perfective. However, my dictionary says бежать is a facultative verb (i.e. it has both ...
1
vote
2answers
370 views

Verbs of motion - how to define local distances?

I am a little bit confused about the idea of driving short distances taking ходить (as in, I’m going to the coffee shop) and what amount of distance is needed before it becomes ездить. For example, ...
0
votes
1answer
150 views

Perfective verbs to describe a routine

I am struggling to see why this sentence used perfective verbs when the use of imperfective ones would be more appropriate: Ба́ня – э́то ме́сто, куда́ ру́сские лю́ди хо́дят, что́бы рассла́биться, ...
0
votes
1answer
163 views

Doubts about "бы ни" meaning "No matter what/ how much/ etc."

I know some Russian constructions which translate the English expressions "Whatever... [sth]", "Wherever... [swh]", "No matter how much... [things]". Those constructions ...
0
votes
3answers
179 views

Difference between questions like "у вас ли сыр?" and "есть ли у вас сыр?"

I am a newbie at Russian. To the best of my knowledge, есть is used in questions when possession is being questioned. I was given the following sentences and their translations: Have you the good ...
0
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2answers
162 views

How would you rephrase the sentence "Всех больных закапывать в семь утра!"?

Of course, the author meant administering eye drops. How do you change the phrase in order to exclude the undesirable meaning (burying people)?
4
votes
4answers
283 views

Different ways of saying "I got"

I've encountered several different ways of saying "I got" in Russian, but I am a bit confused on the differences in nuance these expressions have. To be clear, my question is about the ...
0
votes
1answer
105 views

How would you translate an expression like "would become"?

I was recently assigned to write about the Franco-Prussian War, and wanted to write at the end that "German strength and French revanchism would become causes of World War I." How would you ...
3
votes
4answers
142 views

Perfective x Imperfective doubt

I have the following doubt: Is there a difference in these phrases below? Я видел его, когда он выходил из магазина. Я увидел его, когда он выходил из магазина. Does the first one mean "I was ...
6
votes
4answers
620 views

Why are the endings in "я студентка" and "я была студенткой" different?

My question is this: How did the Russian language end up having different endings in the phrases shown in the title of this post? Now I will make some remarks to explain precisely what makes me ...
4
votes
5answers
1k views

What is the precise meaning of "я считаю, что"?

I am puzzled by the Russian phrase "я считаю, что," which is used very frequently. I know that an approximate translation is "I think that," but I strongly feel that there is some ...
6
votes
2answers
3k views

Forming Russian nouns from verbs

I've noticed a couple of patterns in regards to forming nouns from verbs. 1) Removing the -ть from verbs ending in -бить/быть, -вить, чать and -ять and adding -тие (for example: разбить --> разбитие,...
2
votes
3answers
218 views

Пытался for a one-time action

Why is the past tense of the imperfective verb пытаться used in this context? Говорят, он пытался убить сына Поттеров, Гарри. Но – не смог. I would expect попытался to be more appropriate here since,...
2
votes
3answers
208 views

Я помогу + написать or писать?

In my Russian textbook I came across this example: я помогу Татьяне написать письмо. Why is помогу used with the perfective infinitive? I was expecting an imperfective verb, because "writing&...
1
vote
1answer
122 views

вовлечённых - proper use in a translated English sentence for "involved"?

I had earlier asked a question about adjectives and participles, and cited this link: How to tell a participle from an adjective? I now understand the answer of the above link better - The ...
8
votes
1answer
264 views

Живут или живёт?

I have come across this sentence where the verb жить is declined for the third person singular: Там живёт около 500 человек. Shouldn't живут be grammatically correct since we're talking about ...
45
votes
9answers
11k views

Why do Russians almost not use verbs of possession akin to "have"?

I have always been puzzled as to why the Russians almost never use verbs of possession akin to "have" or "own." Instead of such verbs, the Russians use the preposition у, whose ...
2
votes
1answer
112 views

Can it be said that the verbs in -ить are more localized in space and time than in -еть?

My gut feeling is this is the case. Verbs in -еть usually have prolonged, undetermined and broad character, while verbs in -ить are more "here and now". Is this view correct? Examples: хаметь-хамить,...
2
votes
2answers
191 views

My dictionary sometimes lists two perfective forms

I recently found in my dictionary the triple проща́ться (нв.), прости́ться (св.), попроща́ться (св) for to say goodbye. What do the two imperfective forms mean here in particular? Is there a general ...
6
votes
1answer
580 views

Other meanings of "идти" besides "to go by foot"?

I was reading my copy of The New Penguin Russian Course and I read about the verb идти (to go by foot); I was excited because I finally knew the meaning behind a song that I sometimes listen to (а ...
4
votes
2answers
329 views

Differences between выслать and отправить

Im wondering the correct usage of отправить and выслать (to send/dispatch). I've seen the former in the context: Отправить сообщение в сети (to send an online message) and the latter: Выслать ...
12
votes
7answers
2k views

Do "надо" constructions tend to pair with perfective verbs and if so, why?

I've noticed that constructions with "надо" tend to use a perfective form of a verb. Is there some sort of loose grammar rule dictating this? Or does it just depend on context? For example, can I ...
5
votes
2answers
289 views

Why "вести" but "веду"

Let's compare three verbs and their first person singular forms: нести - несу везти - везу вести - веду Is there a particular reason why, in вести, the с turned into д ? Is there any intuitive ...
2
votes
2answers
300 views

Why "не могу выехать из гаража" but "нельзя выезжать с территории завода"?

Going through some review on verbs of motion in Поехали II, page 40, was the following exercise. Я не умею водить машину и не могу ______ из гаража. So noting that it seemed a one-time, completed ...
3
votes
3answers
231 views

Preposition with спросить

I'm puzzled by the use of the preposition у with the verb спросить: Я спрошу у мамы смогу ли взять машину In this example, the preposition is used. But: Журналист спросил президента о его ...
5
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2answers
826 views
2
votes
2answers
182 views

Unidrectional versus multidirectional verbs (идти - ходить)

In these examples you can see verbs идти (unidirectional) and ходить (multidirectional). Apart from the difference in tense seen in the examples, what is the reason for using different types of verbs? ...
2
votes
2answers
655 views

What is the 12th Russian exception verb?

There is a well-known poem that lists eleven Russian exception verbs: Гнать, дышать, держать, зависеть, Видеть, слышать и обидеть, А еще терпеть, вертеть, Ненавидеть и смотреть. Their exceptional ...
2
votes
2answers
141 views

Sentence with infinitive form verb

I'm reading an article which starts with the sentence: Началом русского авангарда принято считать 1907 год... I understand that началом русского авангарда is the object of считать, so why is считать ...
6
votes
4answers
1k views

How to say "slam a door open/shut" in Russian?

I would like to translate this sentence to Russian: The doors of the [beduin] tents slammed open and shut in the wind. I found the verbs хло́пнуть and захло́пнуть for shutting or slamming a door. ...
4
votes
4answers
178 views

Transitive verbs

I would like to ask about transitive verb in Russian "играть". According to dictionary this verb is transitive but there are common sentences such as: "Дети играют во дворе" "Команда играла плохо" ...
1
vote
2answers
279 views

Difference between "приду" and "прийду"

What is the difference between приду and прийду? Both mean: I will come?(on foot) Also я приеду and я прийеду mean: I will come?(by vehicle) Again what is the difference of them?
2
votes
2answers
228 views

Difference between "читай" and "прочитай"

I just confused with difference of читай and прочитай! For example: Читай журнал Прочитай журнал Both of them mean: Read magazine? But I can't understand difference! I know that Прочитай is a ...

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