8

It's a biaspectual verb (двувидовой глагол): a verb whose perfective and imperfective forms are identical. Other verbs like this are жениться, креститься, казнить and many more Most biaspectual verbs end in -овать and -ировать, but there are some ad-hoc ones as in the example above. Note that they can be homonyms, like the aforementioned креститься, which ...


7

The difference in aspect in Russian does not correspond to English concept of Perfect, let alone the difference between "will" and "to be going to". It is merely a matter of point-of-view: "буду продолжать" focuses on the process, or maybe that the action will be repeated "продолжу" focuses on the result (i.e "I'll stop doing whatever keeps me from this, ...


5

Since Russian doesn't have as many tense forms as English, you often need to use different adverbs or adverbial phrases to express the idea in a more precise way. But in fact, you can rely on context only and use bare Russian tense forms without any additional clarifying words, because Russian can well work this way, too. The idea of the Future Perfect Tense ...


5

Yes, more or less so, except for the two examples involving 'ходить'. Although 'Я буду мочь ходить' may seem grammatically correct, no one says «буду мочь». These words just don't go together (despite Wiktionary quoting «буду/будешь… мо́чь»). Instead, use 'смогу': Я (снова) смогу ходить. 'I will be able to walk (again).' If you want to say 'Don't worry, I ...


3

Ему пришлось бежать быстрее своего соплеменника, ибо оказавшемуся последним предстояло быть съеденным львом.


3

The Set 2 is the right way of expressing this relationship. But the analytic (imperfective) future tense here has undertone of intent rather than actual activity. So although you strive to avoid such surrogates as решишь / соберёшься (+ perfective & imperfecive), не против / готов (+ mainly perfective) and the like, what you end up having is exactly that ...


3

All these sentences are valid meaning you invite someone to come to your place and show some pictures. Заходи как-нибудь, покажешь фотки! {Imperative + Future} (come and you will/can show) Заходи как-нибудь, покажи фотки! {Imperative + Imperative}(come and show) 3.Заходи как-нибудь показать фотки! {Imperative + Infinitive} (come in order to show--purpose )...


3

I'm assuming this phrase means "come and show me the photos sometime" Your assumption is correct. I wonder if "Заходи, покажешь X" is the construction commonly used... Yes, it is quite a usual way to say this. Do the following alternatives sound odd? Заходи как-нибудь, покажи фотки! I can think of a situation wherein someone would use these words, ...


2

I would set the next correspondence: I will continue -> Я буду продолжать = Я продолжу It is the same, I think, but in the first case a verb "буду" (быть) is used, which corresponds to English "will" (to be). The second case is not possible in English. I am going to continue -> Я собираюсь продолжать


2

Для разнообразия напишу по-русски с английскими вставками. Боюсь, что an elegant universal tool для подобных конструкций в русском языке не существует. Как правило, используются те самые дополнительные уточняющие глаголы, которые вы нам "запрещаете" применять вашим параграфом (1). И от выбора таких глаголов, порядка слов и, при устной речи, интонации/...


2

Variant 3 (3) Ему надо было бежать быстрее соплеменника, так как отстающего съел бы лев. OR Ему надо было бежать быстрее соплеменника, так как отстающего мог съесть лев. could (мог бы) and would (бы) are not exactly one and the same but in this context i think the difference is insignificant. Variant 5 (5) Ему надо было бежать быстрее ...


1

A note about the usage of the word пожарить (since you mentioned it). Traditionally, it didn't mean cooking a fried dish. The word поджарить was used in that meaning. Classical dictionaries and serious cooking books confirm that. (Толковый словарь Ушакова) ПОЖА́РИТЬ, пожарю, пожаришь, совер. 1. что и чего. Подвергнуть что-нибудь жарению в течение ...


1

I suppose you should use some helper words to translate Perfect tense, i.e.: "сколько всего рыб ты пожаришь" It will help to understand that you ask about fish that you've already grilled and fish you plan to grill.


1

IMHO, 1) Должен ли парень платить за девушку на свидании? Does the boy have to pay for the girl? (2) Почему каждая женщина должна уметь флиртовать: мужской взгляд Why does every woman has to be able to flirt? (3) Должен ли он уйти? Must he quit? (4) Я должна была быть мужчиной I should have been a man Now, for the meanings: Должен - must: Ты должен ...


1

Without knowing the context or guessing at all at the true meaning of the phrases, I'll just give some syntactical explanations I hope will help 1) All of them. It's a general word that includes all of those possibilities in its definition. Should a man pay for any reason? 2) Phrases like должен(на) уметь, знать, понимать, etc. are interpreted simply as ...


1

I would translate the first three sentences like: Should a guy pay for a girl on a date? Why every woman should know how to flirt: the male view. Should Putin quit? The cases aren't complete, for sure, but they would show something in common. Verb 'должен' in cases translate as 'having the responsibility'. The responsibility might be different, but the ...


1

The modal 'должен' is cognate with the noun 'долг' meaning 'debt'. Knowing that, you understand that 'должен' should be considered through the prism of speaker's values. Even in English 2 speakers can say 'must' for mutually exclusive actions. When you say 'должен' you believe in some thing, you've made some decision. So having relative 'должен' and 'долг' ...


1

As for me this question is very tricky, though I was born in Moscow and Russian is my native language. Anyway: 1) here I think they are going to discuss a cultural norm - is it still actual today 2) here this word is like advice - why do men think that this skill can be useful for women 3) it is like ethical necessity - many people don't like him in ...


1

If you want to follow all 3 wishes, your examples in Set-2 are better. I can name only few variants to express the inverse-ordered chronology: Use Set-2 and stress 'будешь'/'станешь' like you described this for English Если будешь играть со мной в го, я объясню тебе его правила If you will play go with me, I will explain you the rules Если станешь ...


1

We can say Я куплю и нарежу рыбу, если ты потом попробуешь сашими. Я куплю и нарежу рыбу при условии, что ты потом попробуешь сашими. Я куплю и нарежу рыбу, если ты хочешь попробовать сашими. That is, having no such great variety of tense-forms in Russian as in English, we express the sequience of events not grammatically, but lexically and ...


1

Приди - It is imperative within a non-strict sense of commanding (imperative) to do something. "Come to my house and show me.... blabla..." Приходи- It is a no-deal strict order, but you can use it when you are confident to someone also, and you are eager and happy to see the other one that you can say "You will have come to my house" (Will have participle ...


1

No, this is not an aspect, this is future tense. The verb forms приду, буду etc cannot be used for present. They are just future forms. The present forms would be прихожу and есть respectively. The endings might look similar for foreigners, but native speakers clearly distinguish the future forms of the verbs.


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