19

It is perfectly acceptable in modern Russian and you will rarely find any materials with consistently spelt Ё. The letter Ё has a difficult history: it was never really obligatory. I prefer to always type it explicitly. But according to modern orthography it is completely acceptable to write е instead, except in foreign words, names which can be read ...


13

всё can be spelled все, when it's possible to distinguish two words using available context. всё (with Ё) is used when referring to neuter gender singular nouns: всё время (compare masculine весь путь and feminine всю дорогу), забрызгал всё окно всё молоко (compare feminine вся вода) все (with Е) is used when referring to plural nouns: все студенты, все ...


11

Letter ё is optional, it is usually replaced by е. We have a number of questions about this letter on this site, for example: Using written е instead of ë, Is 'ё' a distinct letter, or is it just 'е' with a diaeresis?, What are all the times where "е" changes to "ё"?. In short, letter ё is always used only in ...


11

This is a historical phrase. Before 1918 there were two kinds of letter и - и and і. At that time ink was used to write and dots over i were put after all the letters in the word is written completely. The meaning of the phrase is "to do the things until every little thing is in place". Letter ё on the other hand is optional. Most writers do not put the ...


10

Ё changes into non-stressed "е" after ш and ж. You get same result with лизать: Я лижу, ты лижешь, мы лижем. When the word is one-syllable, so it's obviously stressed, it remains Ё. Although I can think of only one example: ты лжёшь, вы лжёте


10

The liturgical language of Russian Orthodox Church is not Russian but Church Slavonic. Church Slavonic is a codified version of Old Church Slavonic, which technically is not even a direct ancestor of Russian but noticeably influenced Russian. In Church Slavonic there's no such thing like "ё". Technically «да святится имя Твое» is a valid Russian phrase ...


8

The only difference is the way of writing the word. In modern written Russian it is quite often acceptable to write е instead of ё, especially when there is no confusion in meaning, and ребенок is unambiguous. Read more in related questions: "Using written е instead of ë", "Is 'ё' a distinct letter, or is it just 'е' with a diaeresis?".


8

They are both the same, except that in most cases, Russians write "e" instead of "ë", because they instinctively know when to pronounce it which way. So even though one is spelled днём and the other is spelled днем, they're both pronounced [дньом].


8

Yes, both йа and йо are used in russian writing. They are used mostly in loaned words. Йа (and its counterpart ьа) are used when transcribing foreign proper names only: Брайан, Гайана, Майами, Яньань Though I have found a neologism грабьармия which is pronounced as "грабь'армия" without я in the middle of the word. Йо is used in such nouns as йог, ...


7

This is actually a subject of "holy wars" between Russians. Some people insist that using ё must be mandatory, because replacing it by е can change the meaning of a sentence. The most famous example: Завтра Петербург, наконец, передохнёт от жары. This is also quite important in books for children who are just learning to read: they get really confused ...


7

In the church they traditionally pronounce it with "е": https://youtu.be/-cueR_3HVR0 (1:25). By the way, Wikipedia has an entry for this. There you can find several versions of the text (from ancient to modern Russian) with е/ё explicitly marked.


6

This proverb is an adaptation of French "mettre les points sur les i et les barres sur les t". Before the reform of Russian orthography in 1918 there was a letter "i" in Russian alphabet ("и десятеричное", it presents in contemporary Ukrainian alphabet, for example), but there was no "t". So the original French proverb was reduced.


5

These words actually have both different meanings and different pronunciation. Transcriptions are the following: Все - [ф с' э] Всё - [ф с' о]


5

but what about when it is unstressed? for example: хорошЕе There's no soft "ш" in modern Russian, so "е" works just like "э" here: "харошэйэ". Some historical or dialect pronounce may differ. Also, since most people write "е" instead "ё" even when there is supposed to be stress, how are you supposed to know if the letter "e" is pronounced like an actual "...


5

почтальон is pronounced [поч'тал'й'он] почталён would be pronounced [поч'тал'он] which is different. почтальён would be pronounced the same way as почтальон. The reason why it is not spelled this way is because the letter ё is usually avoided in foreign words. The reason possibly is that the ё is often spelled without diacritics, as е, so this may create a ...


4

Short answer for Russian language learners There are no simple rules to detect where Russian letter е should be read as ё (i. e. /jo/ or /ʲo/), as well as there are no rules to detect which syllable is stressed. Use dictionaries. More detailed answer for native and near-native Russian speakers Если упрощенно и вкратце, то переход /e/ → /o/, который и ...


4

The sounds [ɵ]/[jɵ], which are now denoted by the letter ё, were not present in Church Slavonic and a letter to denote them was not there in Cyrillic before late XVIII century. By the time it was introduced there had already been a tradition of conveying [jɵ] as iо or, rarely, ьо (after consonants) in loanwords. Native Russian words which feature those ...


4

Listen to audios, or read IPA transcriptions, at the wiktionary article for все. The first one is the pronuncation of все, the secons one is pronuncation of всё. Note that in Russian ё is often written as е, so the word written as все may actually mean всё. Such ё->е replacement is most common in printed books, newspapers and journals (almost 100% cases)...


3

You should notice that 'ё' is always stressed. If it is not stressed it becomes 'е' everywhere, both in writing and pronunciation.


3

Ребёнок = Ребенок, there is no difference. Russian vowels are paired this way: а - я [а - йа] о - ё [о - йо] у - ю [у - йу] э - е [э - йэ] ы - и [ы - и] Letter ё sounds differently from e, they even are not paired. But letter ё just became unlicky for it's look, people are lasy "put dots on the i's". There were modern attempts to exclude this letter ...


3

е and ё is a equal in most times, but in official documents, passports and other this difference have big value (and make big problems, if in password ё and in other documents - е). ё used as ligature for йо: ёлка, ёж, тяжёлый (but йогурт, not ёгурт). Also ё used in handwriting. In books and press uses е for replace ё (simple tipesettings) without losing ...


3

"все" means everything, anything, everybody, everyone, anyone "всё" means all For example "Всем пока" goodbye everyone "Всё готово" all done


3

To be short: Все - means "everyone". Всё - "everyting". But there are a lot of exceptions. You say "все" about something you can count. "У меня есть все чашки" - "I have all the cups"; And you say "всё" about something you cannot count. "Я выпил всё молоко"- "I drank all the milk"


3

There are plenty of such words; your Майами, or Айова, are examples. However, I am not aware of any words of Slavic origin containing йа or йо; rather, they are loanwords, whether new or old-established. Here, the spelling tends to reflect the spelling of the original as closely as is possible for the different writing systems.


2

When Russians use that proverb they mean not the cyrillic letter И, but latin or old cyrillic i. The reason may lie in the fact that letter Ё is very often being used without dots, like Е. UPD: Artemix led more compelling reason for that.


2

Ввести — это еще половина проблемы. Лично я предпочитаю использовать для этого composing sequence из двух обратных апострофов (`) на QWERTY и соответственно двух знаков «ё» на ЙЦУКЕН. Для чего пользователю Иксов, у которого composing уже настроен, достаточно прописать <Multi_key> <grave> <grave> : "́" U0301 # COMBINING ACUTE ACCENT <...


2

Actually you may see both variants of writing: Майами and Маями. Майами - is official name, however, some people may also use Маями. It's just a problems of transliteration names from one language to another. There is no special rules about transliteration names. For example, in common Miami is used to write like Майами. However, Myanmar is used to write ...


2

A small addendum about substitution and context. In texts for language learners ё should always be used. However, if you look into texts by native speakers, esp. into somewhat literature-based texts for native speakers, ё is mostly replaced with an е. So, if a literature example from a non-adapted book does not make sense, consider thinking if a ё ...


2

"the same sound as "ьо" No. There are separate, while in practice related, effects to be considered there: short pause after the consonant before the vowel. The separation between two sounds. Prevention of blending. softening of the consonant softening of the vowel ( back "hard" vowels like Ы are matching front "soft" vowels like И ) prefixing the "soft" ...


1

Why doesn't Russian have an additional letter for soft o, or just write "ио" or "ьо" instead of "е/ё"? I think this is because of historical reasons. "Ё" was suggested in 1783 by non-linguists to denote a situation when old-style pronunciation (and writing rules) required letter "е" to be written in this position, but modern pronunciation shifted to йо/ьо ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible