41

-small m = т -и with line on top = й -g = д -mirrored s = г These are handwriting style characters, but some of them (m, -и with line on top and mirrored s in particular) are also used in italicized version of some Russian fonts, Arial and Times New Roman to name a few.


40

The character "д" is the lowercase italic version of "Д", which both derive from the greek letter Delta (compare with "Δ", "δ"). In most fonts the straight lowercase letter is written as "д", while "д" is used in italic type. In some fonts (typically monospace console fonts or fonts designed for headings: Tahoma, Lucida Console, Franklin, Arial Bold, Century,...


28

Those are cursive forms: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_cursive The letters you were surprised by are, in order listed, Тт Йй Дд Гг.


22

In short: angle-shaped Л is common to texts written by the hand (handwriting and block letters). In fact non-angle-shaped Л is not used at all in such cases. For printed fonts non-angle-shaped Л is common (roughly 90% vs 10%), though it may be used for artistic effect or to add classic-style flavor to the text. Actually angle-shaped Л is always used when ...


19

First word (Уездная) has an obsolete letter "yat" ("ять") in cursive, so it looks different form its typical form (ѣ). Second word (Нарымъ) has no obsolete letters, although the first letter "Н" is written in uncommon form (maybe someone knows an explanation).


18

While I believe that both answers provided actually answer your question, there is still some information you may find relevant to the issue. First, the fact that the modern Russian T is homoglyphic to the Latin T should not confuse you. @yellowsky has provided an image of T as it had been shaped earlier, before Peter I's reforms. Actually, this is almost ...


18

The letter ы is a ligature of ъ and і. In the past, these were both vowels (something like /ɤ̞/ and /i/) and ы was considered as some mixture of those two vowels.


16

It is a valid letter "д", the fifth letter of the alphabet. The glyph in the example is produced with a cursive/italic font. The other one is a glyph from a regular straight font.


16

The first word is Уездная (County, district). The second word is Нарым. It's a geographic title, no translation.


15

"Э оборотное" is just other name for "э". The reason why it's called "оборотное" (sort of reversed) is that modern Russian "е" initially was written as "є" - well, more strictly among other form this one was used as well. Buy the way, this is how it is still written in Ukrainian.


14

Думаю что целенаправленного изменения штриха не было. Если посмотреть на заглавные буквы печатных книг, видно что штрих в букве И сначала был ровным, потом слегка наклоненным (как бы для удобства письма), затем этот наклон стал более выраженным. Что касается буквы Н, которая писалась как N, то ее вариации тоже в своих крайних формах меняли наклон среднего ...


13

As Alissa correctly said, the first letter in both words is Я, and the first name is Янъ (Yan). But the first word is "Явился". It is neither a first name nor a surname, it means "[there] came". The image is most likely a scan or a photo from a parish book in which the newborn children were recordered. Every such record begins with the name of the place and ...


11

б is a variant of бы that can be used (entirely optionally) if the preceding word ends with a vowel. Чтобы, being что+бы, always has the variant чтоб. Similarly (with the same after-a-vowel rule), ли has ль and же has ж. The full and shortened forms are not entirely interchangeable; the shortened ones are stylistically non-neutral in most contexts, so when ...


10

This is an incorrect (and poor quality) picture. These letters look different in every script. Like this: Ш ш Щ щ Ш ш Щ щ


9

Well, while V.V is not wrong about voicelessness, there's actually something else out there. What you seem to hear is actually an evidence of so called "явления придыхательности глухих согласных" (aspiration of voiceless consonant). It's not х it's more close to the phonetic [h] (like in English hen). In some cases (usually before other voiceless consonant) ...


9

In some fonts you might also encounter 'mirrored 6' which is 'small д'.


8

The word prelude "прелюдия" is printed with an older font. Hence glyphs are slightly different from the modern fonts. In the future you can check such glyphs against the table of Old Cyrillic alphabet. Just keep in mind that many letters from the old alphabet are obsolete now. Additionally, you can pick a font in the character map program on your system ...


8

These are two completely different words. Эго is a noun which means ego. In most cases, it means a (usually boosted) sense of self-importance, for example у него непомерно раздутое эго. In Russian, эго in such meaning has negative connotations. Sometimes эго means Freudian or philosophical concept of ego. Это means it. (There are other, similar, meanings.) ...


8

Russian letter 'Е' sounds differently when it's the first letter of a word, or when it follows a consonant in the middle of a word. Letter 'Э' sounds the same in any part of the word. Both letters are vowels. As pointed out by manjusri, your friend could have mistaken 'З' (Z) with 'Э' (Е). Letter 'Э' sounds similar to 'e' in English words 'bed, bet, ten'. ...


8

The consonant letter resembling a vowel by its form is З з (like number three), so your friend might inintentionally mistake the З з for Э э. The letter Э э is closer to the first part [ε] in the diphtong from the English word 'care', while the Russian E e is closer to pronuciation of English E e in 'ten' as a shorter version of E e in Swedish sedan or ...


7

On modern usage of Ы-words. The absense of words starting from letter Ы was challenged by many creative people in literature and cinema. The letter itself become a codename for "cover operation" in "Операция "Ы" movie and a name of a fictional animal Вепрь Ы from the SF-book by Strugatskies "Трудно быть богом". To my mind, the most influential nowadays is ...


7

Consonants in Russian (and in all other languages) are either voiced or voiceless. The consonants in each pair below are pronounced in exactly the same manner, the only difference being in the presence or absence of vibration in the vocal cords: Voiced Voiceless в ф г к з с б п д т ж ш In Russian pronunciation, all voiced consonants at ...


7

Nobody posted these letters italicized yet, so here you go: Тт Тт Йй Йй Дд Дд Гг Гг Examine this answer's markdown by clicking "edit" to make sure I didn't trick you :ь


7

Поскольку ответы в одно предложение, насколько я помню, против правил (в таких случаях рекомендуется дать больше информации), даю название всех букв. Названия букв в старой орфографии. В квадратных скобках сама буква, если она не совпадает с первой буквой названия. В круглых скобках вариант названия или (курсивом) моё примечание. азъ, буки, вѣди, глаголь,...


5

Would you describe it as [-rx] or as [-rkʰ]? If it's the first, it's not just a четверг thing, but a Southern pronunciation feature where the final /г/ is pronounced [x] instead of simply devoicing to [k]. (Бог is the only example common to all Russian accents.) If it's the second, it's just the final [-k] becoming more breathy in that particular word-final ...


5

If i'm not mistaken it must be титульный шрифт (from the obsolete титул - title, since it was used to inscribe book/chapter titles), or титульная вязь, which i'm not sure is an accurate name because it only becomes вязь when the letters are combined into ligatures or in other decorative ways. And i suppose it's based on устав.


5

Yes, because E e at a beginning of a word is heard as [je]. Moreover, это = this / it эго = Ego (as in Freudian personality theory). I haven't ever seen ето written instead of это by a native speaker who doesn't speak a dialect (and no dialect except for St. Petersburgs or Moscovian is regarded as a prestigious variety of speech by natives). ...


5

My intuition is that perhaps you meant его (as a Single Genitive Case of он(о)) instead of эго, which is more likely to be 'used almost in the same context' as это, or perhaps него. The differences shall be as follows: это (Gen. Sg. этого [étava]) = a) demonstrative pronoun (or b) neutrum descriptive pronoun). a) Это миелофон. = This is a mind-reading ...


5

Every language has its quirkiness. With Russian,this is evident when one starts typing texts on a PC - and then formatting parts of it. Hence, the сведения seems to differ from "сведения". But, this is solely due the use of italics. This can be easily verified by copying "сведения" twice without a particular format, then mark one of these Russian words; ...


5

Well I've never seen it in printed media and I've never met a font using this shape for «л». I'm afraid it will be a bit difficult to recognise, but, well, as part of a logo it might be fine (I don't remember any logos with Λ though). Also note that it is more common to use it instead of «A» in logos. Update. Here are some fonts: ITC Kabel Book Hypatia ...


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