8

First, the "verb + на" is equivalent to English "verb + for". In Russian, the verb is perfective in most cases, but not always. Он взял книгу на неделю - he borrowed (lit. took) a book for a week. Она уехала в Москву на месяц - she left for Moscow for a month. Беру эту книгу на две недели - I borrow (lit. take) this book for two weeks. If some action is ...


7

Both in accusative already: a) отец: b) мать:


7

"Она всё читает" with neutral intonation means rather "she is still reading" (она всё /ещё/ читает where ещё is omitted). You must emphasize всё if you want to say "she reads everything").


7

The sentence does not sound as native Russian to me. First, you should use a pronoun in the second part to refer to «мнение»: Его мнение о тебе неважно и к тому же его можно исправить. Or you may use «это» to refer to the situation as a whole: Его мнение о тебе неважно и к тому же это можно исправить. This answers your main question, but there are ...


7

With the preposition В there're only two options, either Prepositional or Accusative case. Prepositional case when В forms adverbial of location, which answers the question где? - where (at)? - в ЮжнОЙ КореЕ, в ПекинЕ, в КитаЕ, в городЕ, в селЕ etc. Accusative case when В forms adverbial of destination (with verbs of motion or intent) which answers the ...


6

Your guess is correct. "В тишине" is being in a silence, while "в тишину" is a poetic expression (and you will hardly encounter it in a colloquial conversation, as well as «на полупальцах» by the way)- she went away into the silence. For instance, "он сидел в темноте и думал" - he was sitting in a dark place, while "он ушёл ...


6

Is there any general rule in Russian that regulates cases when direct objects can switch from Accusative to Genitive? Not in a perfectly codified form, not that I know of. Rosenthal has a whole chapter in his guide, called Падеж дополнения при переходных глаголах с отрицанием which boils down to these three major cases: Родительный падеж, имеющий в ...


6

Yes, you (and shabunc) are right that aspect is involved here. To use English for comparison: за + (time period) + perfective verb expresses how long it took to complete or accomplish something. Я прочитал книгу за неделю. I read the book in a week/It took me a week to read the book. [and I've finished it] Using just the time period in the ...


6

The grammatical case (Accusative) in the first sentence is correct and applicable to other adverbials of time: в наше время, в наш век, в эпоху коммунизма, в старину, в понедельник - воскресенье, в первый год. In other adverbials of time however a more congruent Prepositional is employed: в прошлом месяце, в будущем году, в январе - декабре There appears ...


5

Is there a possibility that accusative denotes movement until the place and staying there and instumental passing through under the place and walking away afterwards? No. Instrumental is used not specifically because of movement, but because Instrumental case is one of cases to govern preposition под. When под means current location, then it's ...


5

William I'll try to answer your questions from another perspective. "Also, the answers seem to imply that there is a difference in meaning between: "Как долго она не работала?" and "Сколько времени она не работала?" Despite there's difference in form, the meaning is just the same. And your another question: "Is there any ...


4

It is so called отделительный падеж, which is in most cases same as родительный падеж. Принеси мне фрукты - bring me fruits. Принеси мне фруктов - bring me some fruits. You may use both, but using отделительный падеж is bit more polite. When you buy something, you should use accusative. Sometimes, отделительный падеж is different from родительный падеж. ...


4

Иван Иванович идёт на работу в гараж.or Иван Иванович идет в гараж на работу. Гараж here depends on the verb идет, meaning destination, not the noun работа. So the translation should be "He is going to the garage to work"(in order to work).If you change the noun and use the infinitive instead, you can have Он идет в гараж работать. Он идет поработать в ...


4

The verb показываете is in fact imperfective as verbs in Present tense (in Russian at least) can't be perfective. I believe the source of your confusion is the two ways of using the verb to show in English. Namely: 1.to show smbd smth AND 2.to show smbd TO smth Into Russian they are not translated entirely identically: 1. is as показывать, whereas 2. ...


4

Accusative is more suitable in this case. В университете я иду на первую лекцию, математику. В университете я иду на первую лекцию - математику. В университете я иду на первую лекцию, на математику.


4

Corrected: "посадке на Луну предшествовали тренировочные полеты". Dative case used: "to which [Moon landing] something [training flights] was something [forerunner]".


3

Your observation is not quite true. In English the word order is very strict and very important. In Russian, on the other hand, the word order is much more flexible, mostly because of noun cases. For instance, "Я тебя люблю." and "Я люблю тебя." are equally correct ways of saying "I love you". Saying "Она всё читает" is perfectly fine. Depending on the ...


3

Only the first form would be the correct one, you have to conjugate both words in this situation, since this geographical name is not treated as a word borrowed from another language (i.e. a foreign word). Based on this source, there could be a discussion if you would say в страну Южная Корея or в страну Южную Корею, however the second option you would find ...


3

The genitive in this case comes from the omitted 'some quantity of...' which in Russian is typically expressed using an indefinite numeral like немного, несколько. Those numerals agree with a noun in the genitive (несколько яблок, немного воды или чего-нибудь - the numerals can be omitted). If you simply say "принеси фрукты" that would most likely mean ...


3

“в” + noun in prepositional case means location (“in”), while “в” + noun in accusative case means direction (“to”). Note that for most sentences only one of those usages makes sense, the other would use another preposition. “Кит плывет в океан (acc.)” — “A whale is swimming towards the ocean” (from a sea maybe) “Кит плывет в океане (prep.)” — “A whale is ...


2

1a is correct, no к is needed (к is needed with motion verbs: я иду́ к дру́гу vs. я дарю́ дру́гу). The answer is in the question itself: Како́му го́стю вы пока́зываете но́вые карти́ны? Just replace the question word како́му with иностра́нный, keeping the dative case ending (-ому): Иностра́нному го́стю вы пока́зываете но́вые карти́ны. which is a ...


2

Well, as you can see, in the given context both "сколько [времени]" and "за сколько времени" are corresponding to the phrase "how much time" in questions like "how much time it will take". But actually, William, your observation is quite elegant and, the most important, valid. This is indeed has something to do with the perferctiveness/imperfectiveness of ...


2

With один, тысяча, миллион, триллион (in other words, with all that numeral that can be combined with один) dative is used - is just a rule that should be memorized. So: По [одному] миллиону долларов попросили оба министерства but Министерства запросили по два миллиона. Relevant quote from slightly outdated yet quite famous grammar reference: ...


2

It's not a plural form of the accusative case; it's a singular form of the genitive case. Like 'нет кого\чего?' 'доказательства'. The plural form of the accusative case for this word is 'эти доказательства'.


2

Такое выражение встречается у многих классических литераторов (Горький, Аксаков, Гарин-Михайловский, Ключевский, Паустовский... - см. google books). Во всех случаях местоимением "это" ссылаются на предшествующее высказывание (своё или собеседника) - как и в вашем примере. Сейчас так говорят редко, но можно рассматривать данное выражение как идиоматическое ...


2

One of my teachers once said that a noun in a sentence is always in a certain grammatical case and always has a certain role - the subject or an object. In other words, no noun can be in two different grammatical cases at the same time and play a dual role. Your teachers are right. Your examples does not prove, that one word can be used at dual function. ...


1

В чём? - В тишине. Куда? - В тишину. Regardless of whether the expression is used in a poetic sense or not, asking the above questions will help you define the correct spelling or reading of the written words


1

Depending on the context, it could be better Russian to say Я иду на первую лекцию в университете, or Я иду в университете на первую лекцию, and for the Nominative case add это математика. Without это you would have to put the clarifying word in the same case as the object it clarifies. Here it is Accusative.


1

Accusative is governed by another verb, synonymous to предшествовать, namely предварять посадку на Луну предваряли тренировoчные полеты Semantically they're not completely identical, but still can be used as substitutes of each other.


1

Прямой падеж это когда форма совпадает с именительным падежом, а косвенный когда не совпадает. Существительные 3-го склонения (мышь, рожь) и многие существительные второго склонения (шкаф, поле) имеют одну и ту же форму в винительном падеже, что и в именительном. Этот случай называется прямым падежом. Все остальные случаи косвенные. http://nashol.com/...


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