42

Russian has different transcription systems for different languages. Some of them (Japanese, Korean, Chinese) have been developed by a single person or by a group of scholars, who had invested some thought and consideration into them, and had them codified. Some of them (Greek, Latin, English) have been in use for quite a long time, so the rules have just ...


28

First of all, there is a big difference between calling someone by the combination of his first name and his patronymic name (Иван Кузьмич) and calling someone by his patronymic name only (Кузьмич). The first variant is the standard formal way, and the second variant is very informal. I assume you are asking about the first variant. Another important thing ...


27

Absolutely. In Russia, almost every document about a person includes a patronymic, so everyone needs it. If your father has foreign name, you still have a patronymic. If your father is unknown, your mother gives you some patronymic soon after your birth. If she doesn't know the father's name, she may give you her own patronymic. If a baby is found, and ...


21

Станислау (Станіслаў to be precise) is a Belarusian version of name Stanislav. Keep in mind that Belarusian "ў" is more like w, so it does not sound like "oo". Let's not dive into political issues here, but de-facto in all three eastern European Slavic countries there's a tendency to translate name into local variant. Nobody says Павел Маккартни, but ...


21

It's neither a nickname, nor a dinimutive. It's just a form which became distinctive from the (borrowed through Greek) Иосиф and happily co-exist with it just like Johannes co-exist with John. While it indeed initially was introduced at lower-class usage I'm not sure it can be treated as regionalism - I'd rather say it is Russian vulgar version of the name....


20

There are two options: first - patronymic - surname surname - first - patronymic Examples: Иван Иванович Иванов Иванов Иван Иванович In other words patronymic is an "extension" for the first name and can only follow it. Except a very informal form, when only the patronymic is used. For example: Эй, Петрович! The full name is the most formal ...


19

If you call yourself "Андрей" you'll have tons of questions from everybody whether you have any Russian ancestry. It's typical for non-native speakers of Russian to call themselves with their real names, "Эндрю" in your case. Still, I knew a Vietnamese guy named Ha Hai Tan who called himself "Толя" (it's short from "Анатолий"). When I once asked him why he ...


18

There are formal rules for practical transcription of Turkic proper names into Russian: Турецко-русская практическая транскрипция According to that table, ğ is transcribed as г and in rare cases as й. The choice of г brings to the syllable -ган which is more typical for Russian words than -йан and better combines with the previous syllable, ending with -о....


17

There are number of ways of addressing people, and they are all appropriate in different situations. FIRST NAME only - "Иван, подойди сюда" - not formal, very common form of address between people with some familiarity - relatives, friends, colleagues. Does not imply respect or disrespect; LAST NAME only - "Иванов, подойди сюда" - more formal, common form ...


16

Very often. The fun thing about patronymics is that they are huge part of colloquial usage as well. In a friendly conversation one can omit name completely and use just patronymic, like in "Что-то ты, Никитична, сегодня не в духе". Even in most liberal schools students still tend to refer to professors with patronymic. As of jobs - there are many spheres ...


15

In modern Russian language the title "Товарищ" may be used in such variants: just "товарищ" - may be used for addressing a stranger. ("Эй, товарищ! Куда вы пошли?" - "Hey sir! Where did you go?"). It's somewhat outdated and less ceremonious than English "sir". "товарищи" (in plural) - used for addressing to audience. Sounds more crony and isn't official. ...


14

Name Anna Анна - formal Аня - regular, informal (widely used by friends, parents, boyfriend) Анечка, Анюта - maybe used by parents, close friends or a boyfriend (your case) Ань! - regular, the vocative case, used just addressing/calling a person Анют! - is like the previous one, but more cute Others forms from the list, such as Аннушка, Ануша, Ануся, Нюня, ...


14

Strictly speaking, it's "Серафима", with "м". Obviously the concept of translation is pretty vague when it comes to names, after all, Peter is not Пётр. However everyone who is named Seraphina in Italian, Spanish or Latin usually (but not always! - see below) is called "Серафима" in Russian. Why in some languages this name is with "n" and in some with "m" ...


13

Do all Russian patronymics have such forms? No. For example, Ilyich and Petrovna are never reduced. Is there a simple rule to form them? What you took for short forms are merely phonetic reductions. Therefore, they are formed by some kind of a natural process. When unstressed, elaborate suffixes such as -yevich, -ovich, -yevna, -ovna are reduced, the ...


13

As Alissa correctly said, the first letter in both words is Я, and the first name is Янъ (Yan). But the first word is "Явился". It is neither a first name nor a surname, it means "[there] came". The image is most likely a scan or a photo from a parish book in which the newborn children were recordered. Every such record begins with the name of the place and ...


13

Very often, but somewhat less often than decades ago. First of all, the form addressing strongly depends on a scenario. If some scenarios, patronymics are used almost universally, in others, their usage has declined. At school - addressing teachers. This is where children still address adults by First Name + Patronymic; At work - addressing colleagues, and ...


12

There's no grammatical rule in Russian that specifies city name generation based on person names. It's rather random or based on historical context. For example, in early soviet times Stalingrad (now Volgograd), Stalino (now Donetsk) and Stalinsk (now Novokuznetsk) existed simultaneously.


11

Анна is "Аня", "Анюта", "Нюша" and even "Нюра". From this one can derive even more "soft" forms like "Анюточка", "Нюшенька", "Нюрочка" etc. So, basically all the forms mentioned on the page you've mentioned are valid. Stylistically there are very subtle differences but I guess that your story won't sound unnatural with any of these forms. As of the second ...


11

As a Turkic, I say that it is completely true to consider his name as Эрдоган. The name in Turkish is "Erdoğan". Note that the letter "ğ" is a sound most like the French "r" and is also a deformation of the sounds "g" and "q" which in today's Turkish dialect turned not to sound at all! Also note that Russian and Turkic peoples had many encounters during ...


10

Yep, as already is told in comments, "т" is usually standing for t[θ] in modern Russian (though we have Фёдор vs. Theodor, Коринф vs. Corinth). But behold, here I present you a universal algorithm for resolving issues of this kind: Choose one celebrity with this name. In our case, let's go with Keith Richards. Find an article about this person in English ...


10

Транскрипция только польских фамилий даёт в русском варианте "-ий", и если это делается через английский язык, то в случаях, когда польское происхождение носителя фамилии хорошо известно, например Збигнев Бжезинский. https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/Польско-русская_практическая_транскрипция В нашем же случае автор (по википедии) - немецкого происхождения.


9

The term for those names is not "a short name", it is diminutives. Diminutives are for addressing somebody affectionately; they do the job of pet names like sweetie, dear, sweetheart etc. Diminutives are not necessarily shorter or easier to pronounce. They are used differently. Full names are for formal conversations, while diminutives are for ...


9

Сorrect Russian spelling of the last name of the US President-elect, Donald Trump - Трамп.


9

A full Russian name consists of: First name Patronymic (derived from father's first name) Last name, also known as family name. Russian president's full name is: Vladimir (first name) Vladimirovich (patronymic) Putin (last name). The following combinations of names are used in a formal environment: First Patronymic Last - Vladimir ...


9

Алёша is a diminutive form of Алексей. Here is a list of names and their different forms (although it's too comprehensive for its own good, as a result most of the names there are WTF-level obscure): http://www.gramota.ru/slovari/info/petr/imsm


9

Ивано́в is much more common although some Ivanovs prefer to be called Ива́нов. There is also the possessive adjective ива́нов (Ivan's): Ива́нов день (Kupala Night).


8

first - patronymic - surname is the default form and the most respectful one. surname - first - patronymic is used when alphabetic ordering is needed (in lists, encyclopedias, when calling a person from a group/class etc).


8

The first-patronymic-last is the most common form. The last-first-patronymic is something that is used some formal cases like official lists (for instance of awarded persons, or deceased in accident etc.), like: К награждению представляются: Иванов Никита Петрович, Павлова Анна Александровна. Also, last-first-patronymic in articles dedicated to the ...


8

The equivalent "vulgar" term will be цельнозерновая мука (whole-grain flour). More proper term will be обойная мука, while any one or both of these terms may be present on a package.


8

Потому что Буковски - это иностранная фамилия, и ее склонять по русским правилам не принято. Нет русских фамилий на -и, которые бы склонялись в единственном числе. А Достоевский - русский писатель с русской фамилией, которую мы склоняем. Как Дарвин - с Дарвином, но Ленин - с Лениным. Разные правила для иностранных и русских фамилий.


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