47

You have a very good teacher, Mitsuko, and I'm sure one day you will appreciate what he's doing for you. :) The dialogue seems to be grossly ungrammatical and to make little sense It makes perfect sense to a native speaker. The woman asks whether they shall cross the road (or not). The man points out that they can't cross now because the light is red. She ...


39

I suppose that your translation ‘a bout of hysteria’ is more about physiological process, which is uncontrollable. But the verb ‘закатить’ assumes a girl’s intention. So maybe ‘throw a tantrum’ would be better in this context.


35

There are a few different meanings in your examples. Let's try and unpick them. У меня, у нас can be used to express: Possession: у меня = мой, у нас = наш: У меня рука болит = Моя рука болит. У нас народ умный = Наш народ умный (your example #4) A patronizing / possessive way of referring to people, often your kids / spouses, etc. Он у меня ещё ...


35

It seems she said я та ещё щука. Тот ещё means "quite, some, hell of", as in "That's some vacation you spent with me", "That's quite a wife you have", etc: Скорее я могу быть генералом де Голлем, чем он ― секретарем райкома. Между прочим, он тот еще трус Твой Стрельников тот еще жук, и сам денег нагреб, и нам еще осталось. ...


32

The closest match I can think of is "тревожный звонок" / "тревожный звоночек" (more popular form), like in: Если твой парень никогда не приводит тебя в свой дом - это тревожный звонок. Here a some other (real-life) examples: «Авангард» завершил регулярку четырьмя поражениями и упустил второе место на Востоке, это тревожный звоночек. (&...


29

I'm native russian speaker. If you had video/audio call, then you most likely misheard her. It is not "Так что я тающая щука" It is "Так что я та ещё сука". It's not an idiom it's more like just an emotional expression, which can be translated like: "Well, I am a bitch" or "Well, I am bitchy" In regular context it ...


11

I'm not a native English speaker, but from what I've heard, the word “hysteria” in modern English has a lot of unnecessary connotations, especially when applied to women, so perhaps your teacher meant that. I personally would translate the phrase “закатить истерику” into English as “to throw a tantrum”, and Multitran seems to argee.


11

It could be also "Тревожный знак". Like То, что нынешние санкции связаны с внутренней политикой Китая, это очень тревожный знак в санкционной войне между Соединенными Штатами и КНР. Тревожный знак для рубля: доллар перешел черту 70 руб./$. Главный транспорт столицы все чаще подводит пассажиров. Это тревожный знак?


11

The difference is simple: После нас - потоп means after us the flood - meaning just fact: after us there will be the flood. On the contrary, после нас хоть потоп means after us even a flood - meaning “doesn't matter what would happen after us – even a flood, we don't care.”


9

I think you might be looking for широкий взгляд and узкий взгляд: Вроде бы женщины в своих суждениях о морали придерживались более широких взглядов, чем мужчины, но до конца это не доказано. …а владелец «Пенатов», несмотря на его наскоки на футуризм, (показался) — человеком достаточно широких взглядов, способным преодолевать предрассудки поколения и школы. ...


9

When you use red flag as mark that something is suspicious - then it's OK to translate as тревожный звоночек, or just подозрительно as other answers mentioned. Example: Если твой парень никогда не приводит тебя в свой дом - это тревожный звонок (это подозрительно). When you use red flag meaning to identify or draw attention to (a problem or issue to be dealt ...


9

Throw a hissy fit is the best translation for a colloquial usage equivalent IMHO.


8

It is as grammatical as might be a conversation between two hillbillies mumbling to each other about going for a beer or two. It is also as natural and does make sense. Consider: X: So, are we crossing? Y: TF crossing, don't you see it's red? X: Nah I mean, like, eventually. Y: Eventually yes.


7

You're right, "seeker" is exactly what it means. Основная проблема, перед которой стоял ищущий человек, была вполне ясна – религия и атеизм // The main problem a seeker was facing, was very clear: religion or atheism. Любой спортсмен – это ищущий человек, который стремится стать быстрее, выше, сильнее // Any athlete is a seeker, aiming to become ...


7

There's a saying небо в клеточку, друзья в полосочку ("checkered skies, striped friends") which is a metaphor for prison. This refers to the windows grills and prison uniforms. There's another, unrelated idiom черная полоса, literally "black stripe" or "black streak" which means "a rough patch" (in someone's life), and ...


7

As the other answers mentioned the issue here is either your understanding of the Russian word истерика or the English word hysterics. In English hysterics is an archaic term for a psychological condition similar to a nervous breakdown but only applied to women. In the modern times it's mostly used as an exaggeration to describe a strong reaction such a ...


7

It is a scanning mistake, the word is: Вздор Но останавливаться на лестнице, слушать всякий вздор про всю эту обыденную дребедень... Just use other sources of the text.


7

«Тоже мне», with words exactly in this sequence, is a set phrase that means "not really", "as if" and is used to express irony. If you wanted to say "this is news to me too", that would be «Для меня это тоже новость».


6

Note that "red flag" in English lingo also might be not a metaphor but a term for a characteristic reason for alarm (Enter the term "flagged"). It literally may mean to mark something with red in some cases and related to practice using red tape, stickers ("page flags") or red bookmarks in document folders to signify something ...


6

I think the phrase "to cause a scene" works to some extent.


6

Examples from question: (1) Он у нас умный слишком. Он у нас рабочий класс презирает. Смеется над ним. (2) А вот самый-то интересный вопрос – что было бы, если бы Гитлер у нас пошел по этому штрассеровскому пути и все-таки Германия прошла бы гражданскую войну. (3) Конец 40-х годов, Сталин у нас пишет великую статью про язык. (4) - ...


6

Consider this translation: as if that's news


6

The whole idiom consists of two parts, i.e. Ноль внимания, фунт презрения. Ruscorpora.ru gives the earliest mentioning of the fist part by Чехов. А какое, мой друг, несчастие, какая насмешка быть сутулым, лохматым, сереньким, порядочным и неглупым, и влюбиться в эту хорошенькую и глупенькую девочку, которая на вас ноль внимания! [А. П. Чехов. Красавицы (1888)...


5

The dialogue is grammatical from the linguistic point of view: this is how many native speakers do speak. It is however not the prescriptive grammar that one finds in grammar books. Indeed, this is far from the literary Russian or the Russian that Russians learn in school or speak in an educated society (this is why there is some difficulty in punctuating ...


5

Actually the closest I can think of is just "to make a scene" - it's not necessarily a hysteria (though it might look like :), it easily can be not throwing a tantrum, so it's just make a scene, which, according to English dictionaries is "make a public disturbance or excited emotional display". In fact, we do have in Russian "...


5

I'll base the answer on the variants @Quassnoi has provided as all of them are viable. I'll elaborate a bit further. I think the phrase was either 'та ещё щука' or 'та ещё сука', it depends on the cultural background and the manners of the girl. The variant 'та ещё штука' is less likely as it is usually said in a diminutive way: 'та ещё штучка'. I'll add ...


4

"The most important lesson may be for those who receive political information. Sure, it is important to consider the source, but the content matters, as well. Our favorite messengers are sometimes wrong and our least favorite messengers are sometimes right. It’s sometimes worthwhile to pay a lot more attention to what is being said, and a lot less to ...


4

In my opinion, "зашоренный" is a good candidate for close-minded in some cases. Here's definition and example from wiktionary: разг. состояние по значению прил. зашоренный; ограниченность восприятия ◆ В актере, которого нам предлагали, он не видел ничего высокого, никакой художественной перспективы, ничего достойного для себя. Меня тогда удивила и ...


4

Here "все брошу" would be better translated "I'll drop everything". While "бросать" does mean "to throw" it doesn't necessarily mean to throw like one would a ball. It often is used in senses closer to "throw away", "drop", "get rid of", or "leave". Here it is used metaphorically ...


2

The Ищущий in this case has a non-specific meaning, but rather poetic. May indicate: person interested in math; person interested in self-development, broadening the horizons


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