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33 votes
Accepted

Why do Russians almost not use verbs of possession akin to "have"?

First of all, a shameless plug of my earlier answer on why у does not quite mean "near" (but something more akin to the French chez, i.e. a place/household/domain notion used in the abstract.) ...
Nikolay Ershov's user avatar
27 votes

Why does she say "Я понимаешь" and not "Я понимаю"?

Right punctuation is Я, понимаешь, я это чувствую, потом мы всё наверстаем, я предчувствую The translation is I, you know, I'm feeling it, we will catch all then, I forefeel it. "Понимаешь&...
artptr's user avatar
  • 1,158
24 votes
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What is the meaning of "понаехать"?

Понаехать here is used in the sense 4 in Wiktionary: "to go in large numbers to a place where one isn't welcome". It's normally used in reference to big cities like Moscow or St. Petersburg ...
Quassnoi's user avatar
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24 votes

What is the meaning of "понаехать"?

The colloquial пона- prefix, in general, describes something done to excess. Понастроили домов! — Too many houses have been built! Понапокупали прав! — Too many people have bribed their way into ...
Roman Odaisky's user avatar
23 votes

What's the 'present simple' form of the word "нашла́" in 3rd person singular female?

No, it shouldn't, a different verb should be used here -- "находить". The 3rd person singular form of this verb is "находит". The difference between those two verbs is the aspect. "Найти" is a ...
Guest's user avatar
  • 231
20 votes

Do "надо" constructions tend to pair with perfective verbs and if so, why?

You use perfective verbs when you are talking about a task that you have to complete once: Мне надо помыть четырёх кошек (и потом я могу отдыхать). And you use imperfective verbs when you are ...
Abakan's user avatar
  • 4,309
20 votes

What's the difference between "люблю" and "обожаю"?

Люблю читать is 'I like reading' while your task was to translate 'I love reading'. 'To love' is neutral любить when referring to relationships between people, but when it refers to things or ...
Yellow Sky's user avatar
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20 votes
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Do Russians really use "Расход!" to say, "Let's go!"?

The character is saying расход! indeed, which is supposed to mean "scatter!", as a command. This is not a mainstream word, but its meaning is obvious to a Russian speaker. Russian sports and ...
Quassnoi's user avatar
  • 54.2k
19 votes

How can I finally understand the confusing modal verb "мочь"?

For a person (and in Russian everything is a person), the Russian thought model makes no distinction between: the person's moral right to do something; the person's ability to do something (like, ...
Vader B's user avatar
  • 299
19 votes

Why do Russians almost not use verbs of possession akin to "have"?

First of all, I agree with Nikolay Ershov and others who point out that your understanding of "у" is incorrect: it really mostly means belonging (even stronger than chez) and only secondarily and ...
Jen I's user avatar
  • 291
17 votes
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Calling a proper noun with "называть"

I understand where your confusion comes from: the verb seemingly agrees with the preceding noun which you mistook for the subject. This sentence is actually of a special kind called неопределённо-...
Sergey Slepov's user avatar
17 votes

What's the difference between "люблю" and "обожаю"?

I think that it's a three layered thing in Russian: мне нравится читать я люблю читать я обожаю читать Just like @V.V. also do believe that "я обожаю" is too strong here. After all, we'll end up ...
shabunc's user avatar
  • 37.9k
17 votes

Other meanings of "идти" besides "to go by foot"?

Well, идти has a lot of different use cases in Russian, such as (in no particular order): functioning (usually about watches) - "часы идут" run through - "дорога идёт через лес" broadcasted by TV, ...
shabunc's user avatar
  • 37.9k
13 votes

Verbs of motion - how to define local distances?

Well, it's quite straight-forward, "ездить" is always about going by car, by public transport etc. - in other words, it's never about walking. When one is saying "я езжу в это кафе ...
shabunc's user avatar
  • 37.9k
12 votes

Difference between поиграть and сыграть

Поиграть means 'to play a little (for some time, with something)' and if it's about some game (not just toys), then maybe to leave it unfinished. До двух часов поиграем в футбол, потом пойдём ...
Alex_ander's user avatar
  • 11.9k
12 votes
Accepted

Do Russian speakers consistently produce the same perfective form for a new verb?

Different Russian speakers may come up with different perfectives for the same verb (new or not) and there is a good chance that listeners will recognise the original verb and the perfectiveness. ...
Sergey Slepov's user avatar
12 votes
Accepted

How to say "slam a door open/shut" in Russian?

Двери палаток хлопали, открываясь и закрываясь от ветра. Note that хлопнули is a single-event verb whereas хлопали is a multi-event verb which is probably what you wanted. I think you used "open ...
Sergey Slepov's user avatar
12 votes

Why do Russians almost not use verbs of possession akin to "have"?

(Here is an empirical explanation of the modern habbit; I'm not a linguistics specialist and could only speculate on the reasons of such pattern) Because complicated morphology allows us Russians not ...
Paul's user avatar
  • 303
11 votes
Accepted

"Встань" or "встать"?

Both forms are correct. "Встань" - is for "[you,] stand up!" - it's the imperative form. "Встать!" is the infinitive form that also can be used in modern Russian as an imperative. The difference is ...
shabunc's user avatar
  • 37.9k
11 votes
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How can I finally understand the confusing modal verb "мочь"?

As pointed out in comments, your impression of English “can” and “may” seems too rigid. Consider these dictionary definitions with the many meanings and examples, some of which overlap, and the usage ...
Chortos-2's user avatar
  • 226
11 votes
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What is the precise meaning of "я считаю, что"?

In her book "Русская семантика в типологической перспективе". Глава II "Русская семантика в лексикографическом аспекте", 7. Глагол считать Анна Зализняк dedicated several pages to the verb считать in ...
tum_'s user avatar
  • 3,012
11 votes
Accepted

Difference between быть and бывать

Here is what I was taught regarding the matter. Some centuries ago бывал was considered a special past tense of быть. I quote from Российская Грамматика written by М. Lomonosov in 1755: § 268 Времен ...
Mitsuko's user avatar
  • 11.2k
11 votes

Do Russians really use "Расход!" to say, "Let's go!"?

I did not find the specific invocation, but there are two possible uses of this word: Turning the verb расходимся (we part ways) to a noun. This is unusual but can surely arise in a subculture slang. ...
alamar's user avatar
  • 2,766
10 votes
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What does "сошелся" (or "сошёлся"?) mean?

No, he didn't live with other writers. This is a pretty old-style text. In this context сошелся means just met (встретился / познакомился / подружился). The infinive form of сошелся is сойтись.
Dmitry's user avatar
  • 8,436
10 votes
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Как называется явление, когда два глагола стоят рядом в одной форме

В случае, когда два глагола стоят в одинаковой форме, причем одно указывает способ, а второе цель действия, имеет место осложненное глагольное сказуемое. Запятые в этом случае не ставятся. dic....
AlexVB's user avatar
  • 1,782
10 votes
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Imperative with imperfective verbs

Yes, откройте sounds more polite, especially when followed by пожалуйста. Открывайте is more likely to be followed by сейчас же! (immediately!).
Sergey Slepov's user avatar
10 votes

What's the Russian verb for "to install (a computer application)"

установить/устанавливать (по)ставить can be used colloquially
Баян Купи-ка's user avatar
9 votes
Accepted

How to remember the differences between all of the "-гляд-" verbs?

Often one can infer the meaning of the word in Russian by analyzing prefixes and suffixes. Because there are stable patterns. However, one also needs to consult a dictionary, because there are so ...
Vitaly's user avatar
  • 3,109
9 votes
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Confused by я заказать in a sentence

Могу ли я заказать... means "May I order ..." Note, that both in English and in Russian, "I" (я) refers to "may" (могу), not to "order" (заказать), the latter being in the infinitive in both languages,...
Yellow Sky's user avatar
  • 26.1k
9 votes

Do Russian speakers consistently produce the same perfective form for a new verb?

There would be no consensus for most new verbs yet for verbs with -овать four main models are possible: Biaspectual verb (like казнить): same forms used for both aspects; Imperfective pair: ...
Viridianus's user avatar
  • 1,023

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