13

Well, it's quite straight-forward, "ездить" is always about going by car, by public transport etc. - in other words, it's never about walking. When one is saying "я езжу в это кафе часто" or "она ездит на остановку электрички" - it's never about going by foot, otherwise it would have been just "ходить". On the other ...


9

The difference between бе́гать and побе́гать is not just aspectual. Побе́гать is in line with other similar verbs such as посиде́ть, постоя́ть, покури́ть all meaning 'to do something (сиде́ть, стоя́ть, кури́ть) for a while'. In other words, these verbs describe a continuous process with a distinct beginning and an end. Я бе́гаю ка́ждый день. - I run every ...


8

I was expecting an imperfective verb, because "writing" is a process. Perfective verbs are about state transition and imperfective verbs are about state. Usually (usually) the state implies some process, and the state transition implies the start or the end of this process, but it's not always the case. Я помогу Татьяне писать письмо This would ...


7

The difference is in emphasis: У вас ли сыр? - Is the cheese with you? Есть ли у вас сыр? - Have you got any cheese? Ли usually follows the word being questioned: (1) questions the location of the cheese (with you or somewhere else?) (2) questions the existence of any cheese with you. One could also ask: Сыр ли у вас? - Is it cheese that you have? У вас ...


7

Rosenthal et al.: Форма единственного числа сказуемого указывает на совместное действие, форма множественного числа – на раздельное совершение действия. Ср.: Пять солдат отправилось в разведку (группой). – Пять солдат отправились в разведку (каждый с самостоятельным заданием); К началу экзамена явилось десять студентов. – Десять студентов окончили институт ...


3

Actually, the original phrase is not fully correct. 'To administer eye drops to patients' should be 'закапывать больным' with 'patients' in dative rather than accusative ('закапывать больных'). The accusative with 'закапывать' indicates whatever you use as drops (cf. 'закапывать капли'), so it would mean 'to drip patients' - or, indeed, 'to bury them', since ...


3

This is a decades-old, battle-proven "bulletin blooper" joke, deliberately using quite a contrived synecdoche (закапывать больных vs. закапывать глаза больным) to achieve the very much intended pun. Get rid of the synecdoche, and the pun goes away.


3

"Пытаться" and "попытыться", apart from continuous vs one-time effort, has another difference in Russian language. "Пытаться" is associated with an all-out, earnest effort to do something. "Попытыться" implies that either the effort was inadequate, or the chance of success was small to begin with. "Он пытался ...


3

Your sentence is not grammatically correct. You cannot just calque wanted us involved into Russian, it does not work this way. Correct literal translation, albeit a stylistically sloppy one, would be поэтому наш отец и хотел, чтобы мы были вовлечены во встречу с агентом. In the sentences which do work like this, you have to put the participle in instrumental:...


2

According to the "Правила русской орфографии и пунктуации. Полный академический справочник" (под редакцией Лопатина): Глаголы на −еть – непереходные 1-го спряжения – имеют значение ‘стать каким нибудь, приобрести признак’, например, "обессилеть". while Глаголы на −ить (в 1 м лице и отсутствует) – переходные 2-го спряжения – имеют значение ‘...


2

Consider following pairs: Я помогу Татьяне писать письма and Я помогу Татьяне написать письмо In first case it's about helping Tatyana to write letters in general - like (let's just imagine) she is exhausted to do it on her own. Here are some other pairs to give you idea: Я помогу тебе делать домашние задания. Я помогу тебе сделать домашнее задание. Я ...


2

The thing is, убить is really a one-time action, so a perfective verb is used, but пытаться убить is far from being one-time, it took some time, there was a kind of struggle with what prevented the attempt, that's a reason why the verb is imperfective. It is a mistake to think that the Russian verb aspect has a 1:1 correlation with some categories of the ...


2

Both Russian sentences are conditional sentences with the protasis (the part describing the antecedent) omitted or implied. It describes the consequence ("will not just sit and watch") of an antecedent which is not mentioned. For the sake of discussion, I will assume that the antecedent is "a pandemic breaks out" Левый госминистр не из ...


2

Осведомля́ться, ознака́мливаться, информи́ровать are all very formal. It is impossible to "информи́ровать себя́" (I hereby inform myself... ) "Я чита́ю" is quite universal: Я чита́ю о параличе́ хо́бота у слоно́в. Or if you want to sound more casual: Я тут ко́е-что почи́тываю о слона́х. In the past: Я тут подначита́лся немно́го о ...


1

У вас ли сыр? - you are asking about certain piece of cheese that you are searching. You know it is at somebody's but not sure at whom.


1

I only want to add to (correct and complete) Sergey's answer that questions like "не у вас ли моя ручка" oftentimes imply that the person asking actually already knows that the answer would be yes, like in: Ты хочешь одолжить у меня чайник? А не у тебя ли мой пылесос, Пётр Николаевич?


1

Well, by meaning it's something like: Немецкая мощь и французский реваншизм впоследствии станут причиной Первой мировой войны. or Сила немцев и реваншизм французов в итоге станут одними из причин Первой мировой войны.


1

You are right. Я видел его, когда он выходил из магазина. This видел means a process of watching somebody leaving the shop. Я увидел его, когда он выходил из магазина. The perfective version just mentions the fact. I saw him.


1

It means "I'm going to help Tatyana to have the letter written" or just "to write the letter". You can't use words of one language for your assumptions regarding another language. "Writing" is a process, yes, but there is no word "writing" in the Russian sentence.


1

An important point to note here is that the grammar of a language is its lower level description that you are not going to be aware of if you speak the language fluently. People did not learn a language in a formal way as we do today in schools for most of history. The vast majority of the speakers of a language that doesn't have a verb for "to have" wouldn'...


1

Ние (нье) or Тие (тье) they're formed with Past passive participle of the perfective verbs, if the past passive participle of the verb ends in "нный", the verb noun is ние, if the past passive participle of the verb ends in "тый", the verb noun is тие, examples: Простить / прощённый / прощение Описать / описанный / описание Открыть / ...


1

"Possession is generally expressed in Russian using у + genitive case. " - not at all necessary. "the less useful phrase иметь место ... should иметь be avoided in everyday conversations" - no. :> Well, "Я имею машину, дом, etc" - ok; but this "иметь" strongly emphasizes precisely the fact of possession. More ...


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