24

Right punctuation is Я, понимаешь, я это чувствую, потом мы всё наверстаем, я предчувствую The translation is I, you know, I'm feeling it, we will catch all then, I forefeel it. "Понимаешь" in this case isn't a really the verb, but acts as a filler. The full phrase would look like "понимаешь ли ты?" (do you understand?)


16

Russian has the T-V distinction. This means that you use the plural version of "you" (вы) when addressing a person who is senior, superior, or just someone you're not too acquainted with. This only works for the second person. If your are talking of someone in third person, you use the singular pronouns and verbs, even if you would have used вы to ...


11

In its singular form imperative form can serve as conditional mood, so the sentence "Упади на него целый сугроб, то и тогда бы, кажется, он не нашел нужным стряхивать с себя снег" can be rephrased as "Если б на него упал целый сугроб, он и тогда бы …". Here are some other examples to give you idea: Знай [бы] я тогда, чем дело обернётся, ...


8

his dream of going to America There are two basic options. Convert it to a noun phrase, like what Limbgen suggested. This is similar to what would be "dream of a trip to America": eго мечта о поездке в Америку Note it uses the Prepositional case; a more literal equivalent would be "dream about a trip..." Use a perfective infinitive. ...


8

Звонить + дат. means "to call someone". The object has to be animate. Я отдельно живу от отца, поэтому можешь звонить мне в любое время. [Андрей Геласимов. Жанна (2001)] Звонить + куда? means "to call something (like a place)". The object has to answer the question "to what place? / where to? / whither?" It can be a noun ...


7

My Russian is at the A2 level, at best, and I don't know your teacher, so I don't know what reason he or she may have had for telling you that сок cannot be replaced by стакан сока, but I know why I would tell you that you shouldn't replace сок with стакан сока. I would tell you that "стакан сока" shouldn't replace "сока" because it ...


7

The difference is in emphasis: У вас ли сыр? - Is the cheese with you? Есть ли у вас сыр? - Have you got any cheese? Ли usually follows the word being questioned: (1) questions the location of the cheese (with you or somewhere else?) (2) questions the existence of any cheese with you. One could also ask: Сыр ли у вас? - Is it cheese that you have? У вас ...


6

Most often “и” translates to “and”, but it's used in other ways as well. For example, it can be used before each item in an enumeration. Compare: “Я купил чай, хлеб, сыр и чеснок” “Я купил и чай, и хлеб, и сыр, и чеснок” The first sentence sounds dry, a mere statement of fact: “I bought tea, bread, cheese, and garlic”. In the second sentence, by prefixing ...


6

In playing cards, ‘Queen’ is дама and ‘King’ is король. The first variant of the translation is absolutely correct, Я между королем и дамой - Где я ? Also, королем can be spelled as королём which is even more correct. Whenever a Russian word has the letter ё, one is free to spell it as e, still the pronunciation remains that of ё, that is, [jo] or [o] with ...


6

The "и" in Russian apart from its main function also serves as - very roughly - as a counterpart of English so, like in phrase "so what"? - this is translated like "и что"? The "и" add expressiveness and the whole phrase get a slightly different meaning. Let's examine one of examples provided by @yaroslav-fyodorov, ...


6

That is a very good question. Indeed, in some contexts что́бы can be dropped. These include: VERB + что́бы + INFINITIVE: Я пришёл[, что́бы] поговори́ть с тобо́й. Я звоню́[, что́бы] сказа́ть, что не смогу́ прие́хать. Я ходи́л в магази́н[, что́бы] купи́ть молока́. NOUN + что́бы + INFINITIVE: У меня́ есть по́вод[, что́бы] напи́ться. У меня́ есть де́ньги[, ...


6

This is an example of so called "finale dative" (дательный цели). It is used in expressions describing necessity or predetermination. Мне завтра (идти) к врачу // I have a doctor's appointment tomorrow Мне скоро (выходить) на работу // I need to leave for work soon. Мне он не нравится, но тебе с ним жить // I don't like him, but it's you who will ...


5

The difference in your particular example is that the first sentence is valid and the second is not: you just don't use the reflexive form for such purposes. Even more, even if someone decides to sound unusual, non-trivial and choose the second from, it still will be the imperfective form, that is, it would be "[Этот] дом строился моим отцом" - ...


5

While "почему нет" indeed can serve a shorter form completely equivalent to "почему бы и нет", there's actually a use case when those forms are not interchangeable. Imagine following two conversations: Анна: А пошли в кино? Борис: Нет Анна: Почему нет? У тебя какие-то другие планы на вечер? And: Анна: А пойдём в кино? Борис: Почему [...


5

Yes and yes. You can use пойдут even if they are driving. Here it has the meaning of attend. Ребенок ходит в школу even if he is actually going by bus (and perhaps even having online lessons). Perfect aspect is fine. If you use будут ходить it will mean repeatedly or periodically.


4

Такое употребление не часто, но встречается в литературе: ― Я, баринъ, до двадцати пяти лѣтъ не зналъ какія такія женщины, а бывало съ дѣвушками же вмѣстѣ купаюсь на рѣчкѣ... [А. А. Черкасов. Из записок сибирского охотника (1888)] Вчера и сегодня купался на море ― на пляже в курорте. [К. И. Чуковский. Дневник (1925)] Вчера в три часа поехал в Cannes, ... ...


4

It's just how it is :) When talking about the number, -9, you just don't decline the word 'minus': N. минус девять A. минус девять G. минус девяти D. минус девяти I. минус девятью P. минус девяти Thus, your sentence should say: Но́чью температу́ра коле́блется ме́жду ми́нус девятью́ и нулём гра́дусов. When using «минус» as a noun in its own right, it is ...


4

Я не видел табличек, на которые было бы написано "ул. 8-е марта", тем более чтобы на некоторых - всё-таки даже в самых курьёзных случаях адреса по всей улице выглядят единообразно. Правильно "Улица восьмого марта", потому что, по российской традиции именования географических объектов, улицы, названные в честь какой-то даты - они именно в ...


4

Good question Both variants are grammatical, but only the first one (Дом был построен отцом) is valid. +1 To @shabunc 's answer. Why? Reflective verbs are not universally usable in Russian. Perfective reflective verbs have some level of expectation that the subject had been actively involved in the process. Thus, "Дом построился отцом"/"House ...


4

You can use either aspect, but the perfective requires a special verb. You can say either мы играли целый час or мы проиграли целый час. Проиграть here is used not in the meaning of "to lose" but in the meaning of "to spend the time playing". The latter emphasizes the fact that you're talking more about the time spent and not about the ...


3

"Было от чего" means "There was a reason".


3

I think it is similar to how we pronounce other punctuation when narrating. We will say "ударил мальчика дефис шута" for "ударил мальчика-шута", not "мальчика дефиса шута". We will say "от пошёл за водкой", запятая, "колбасой", запятая, "сосисками", not он пошёл за водкой, запятой, колбасой, запятой,...


3

I think, the root of the problem is that the word "like" can have different meanings in English. It can mean "I want to buy/book/order" or simply "It is pleasant to me". In the English sentence the intended meaning looks like "I want to buy", so the correct translation into Russian will not be with "мне нравится&...


3

The pedagogical purpose of the exercise is to introduce the specific Russian possessive construction “y + possessor in the Genitive case” which is rather unusual outside of the Slavic languages. If what you wrote in your question is the exact way it is written in the exercise (no capital letter, no full stop), then those are noun phrases, not sentences, they ...


3

In the first sentence, it is an example of an anaphora (rhetorical word repetition in the beginning of the phrase). It is a thing in English as well: "in sickness and in health, in good times and in bad" etc. It is grammatical. You don't need to use it in this sentence, but you can. Взрослые вспоминают его с волнением и с нежностью. Волнение и ...


3

"a" is likely used here to emphasize negligent tint of phrase. However, it is not necessary here.


3

I'll try to offer a slightly more "formalistic" explanation. "Долго" refers to a long stretch of time. How long, and up to which point, depends on the context. "Недолго" is a short stretch of time. "Надолго"/"Ненадолго"1 is for that stretch of time, and usually expresses intention. "Давно" is a ...


3

In Russian, short (predicative) forms of adjectives only work for definite nouns. Машина бела means "the car is white". It only makes sense when speaking of a particular car, which would have been defined earlier in the context. You can say something like Это не скорая помощь. Скорая помощь — белая, which would mean "This is not an ambulance ...


2

Russian allows to tell the same thing different ways with slightest differences in meaning, and this is the case. I would say that they both are translated to English as «The book is in my room». The first one is more grammatically correct, but rarely used in real life. The second one is a kind of simplification and is used more often in spoken language. I ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible