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Что in this context is a relative pronoun, corresponding to English "who", "that" or "which". If those professors that teach the students… There also was Lena, the lead singer, who was a grade younger You (literally, "that (woman)"), who were with me, where are you now? This usage is a little bit dated, and a ...


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«Насколько» is the complement.


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This part of Russian is one of the most problematic for foreign learners. (It's comparable to English articles, which are generally hard to explain.) There's a class of actions which are hard to attribute completeness to. For "buy" it's clear: it's just "have bought". But what about "see", "think", "consider",...


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Yes, Belarusian is an East Slavic language, the same as Russian and Ukrainian. Of all languages, Ukrainian is closest to Belarusian. Once you get used to Ukrainian pronunciation, you'll realize that they share a large part of vocabulary. Belarusian and Ukrainian haven't had such a profound impact of Church Slavonic as Russian had. Instead, they had more ...


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As a rule of thumb, the perfective form refers to a completed action, while imperfective form implies that the action was in progress (and not necessarily finished). However, in real life there are a lot of nuances :-). Let's just look at your particular examples: Example 1:"я видел его вчера" vs "я увидел его вчера" The above-referenced ...


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Generally, perfective forms are used for singular, novel events, while imperfective forms are used for events that might have occurred repeatedly. "я видел его вчера" - "I saw him yesterday". "я увидел его вчера" - "I was successful (or lucky) in seeing him yesterday"; "он звонил мне вчера" - "He ...


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Горячее, as a noun, refers to a particular dish — usually a meat dish. Я люблю есть горячее. (meaning "I like eating hot meat dishes") Принесли горячее – жаркое со свининой. And for the adjective горячее, you need a noun in the sentence or in the context (and the meaning is different, referring to the temperature, or the way the dish is served). Я ...


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The phrase я люблю есть горячим means "I like eating while my body temperature is high" (literally, "I like eating while I'm hot"). Note that in Russian, unlike English, the phrase я горячий doesn't mean "I'm sexy" or "I'm feeling hot". It only means what it says on the tin, like "I'm tall" or "I'm black&...


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The ending -ить does not tell you much about how a verb is conjugated. As you've seen, verbs ending in -ить can be conjugated differently. Let me throw in: люби́ть - люблю́ жить - живу́ Note that бре́ю and гнию́ also differ in emphasis. Moreover, verbs that are conjugated similarly, can have different infinitives: брею, бреешь, бреет, INFINITIVE: брить ...


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Is there a way to definitely tell whether a sentence is using the negative genitive or not? Not definitely, no. But it's more likely to be the plural accusative than the singular genitive. In Russian, the genitive, among other things, conveys a meaning of indefiniteness. It can be translated into English as "some (of)" (or "any (of)" in ...


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