8

It's a Church Slavonic calque from Greek παμμέγιστοσ ("the greatest of all"). The Greek word had been used as a title of several Christian saints in medieval Greek literature and was calqued by Slavonic translators. The tradition of using a positive Slavic adjective and the prefix все- to form a superlative form can be also observed in words like всеблагий ...


7

It's the Russian internet slang. Don't use it, just understand it. It's used mostly by men denoting short and loud laughter. The neutral word will be захохотал.


6

Yes, the склизкий is still doing fine. It is not used very often, however mostly you can hear it when talking about a fish or a frog (last two lines of your example). Here whats search in National Corpus gives: Пал Палыч начал чувствовать в груди противную дрожь, как будто холодная склизкая толстая жаба забралась прямо в душу. [Олег Павлов. Карагандинские ...


4

OK, so your question have been answered: it's from the internet slang; but I'd like to slightly correct some assumptions made in the comments about how орать became a slang word. And oh my, where do I even start… First of all, LOL is not just “the closest English slang word” for орать, it's literally its (grand)father. A lot of Russian slang words came ...


4

Всевеликий means 'great to the utmost extent', it is often used in religious contexts and refers to the Lord, Всевеликий Господь, 'God the Almighty'. In the name of the Всевеликое Войско Донское this word is also translated into English as 'almighty', 'the Almighty Don Host'.


4

The words with -оло- / -оро- / -ере- / -ело- are typical of the East Slavic languages, not only of Russian, but also of Ukrainian and Belarusian. That phenomenon is called "полногласие" (pleophony). It is a characteristic feature of the Eastern Slavic languages, West and South Slavic languages don't have that. In the South Slavic languages (Old Church ...


4

In Polish, there is a noun błąd [bwɔ̃n̪t̪] 'mistake' to which there is an etymological cognate in Russian, блуд, 'fornication'. But Russian has other words formed from the root блуд which are not connected with fornication, e.g. заблудиться, the same in Polish, only without a prefix: błądzić [ˈbwɔɲ.dʑitɕ] 'to stray, to roam, to rove'. Pronounced with all the ...


3

Yes, склизкий, is still alive and native used. If anything have this property - it mean that if you hand touch it you'll have thin layer of softy and hydrate dirt.


2

You assumption is basically wrong. First of all, Kaliningrad Oblast is not that isolated. I'm talking not only about some obvious things like common media space which drastically reduces dialectal differences all over the world. The thing is that nowadays in modern Russian there's no such thing like full-fledged dialects - with separate pronunciation norm, ...


2

склизкий has some yucky undertone. When we mention a slug we can say "склизкий слизень" for example. But in the article it mean slippery (because of North Novgorod dialect) and the word is not used as "slippery" in ordinary, colloquial conversations


2

Орать is the latest (mid-to-late 2010s) slang for loud laughter. It originated on the internet and is not tied to a particular region (not many things are, in modern urban Russian). The form орнуть is used to add even more expressivity. Forming new, ad hoc perfective verbs with -ну-, instead of a prefix (e.g. заорал), has always had a touch of the ...


2

I live in Bryansk region and I've met a similar dialect near the border with Belarus. Maybe it has something to do with it.


2

I'm not aware of particularly Smolensk-area dialects (and I know very little about them in general quite honest) however what you are describing is not that unimaginable. In northern group of Russian dialects following happens: Smolensk-area dialect does not belong to northern group of dialects. However! This quote: "этот тип склонения ... встречается ...


1

I think it's a colloquial kind of declension (i.e. one of many deviations from established grammar rules observed in everyday speech). From my experience, native speakers use such forms occasionally regardless of their geography. Although it might be more common in some areas more than in others. Perhaps, linguists on this forum can give more informed (...


1

Used in Ukraine also since early 2000s in the meaning of laughter and I want to specify that it is not necessarily a sudden short laugh - it is used in a wider semantic range of a word laugh. Some examples: - Ору с него Means that the speaker thinks someone's behavior is funny. - Рассказали вчера анекдот - я так проорался 🤣 means: They told a joke ...


1

I first met 'Орать' and 'Орнуть' used as a substitute to 'to laugh' by a person form city of Omsk (Siberia) in the early 2000s, way before internet culture grew on Russia's youth. Nowadays it's much more common though.


1

"Орнуть" is a slang, commonly used by young not-well-educated people. I would strongly recommend not to use it anywhere.


1

The dialectic regional блондить originates from the idiom блыонды бить. In some dialects we observe idioms which are different in possessing either one or a combination of consonants in the first syllable. They are лыОнды бить и блыОнды бить 'бездельничать' which are equivalent to a well-known бить баклуши. The idiom лынды бить 'бить баклуши, бездельничать' ...


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