7 votes

Which Russian dialect does "орнуть" belong to?

It's the Russian internet slang. Don't use it, just understand it. It's used mostly by men denoting short and loud laughter. The neutral word will be захохотал.
Elena's user avatar
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Which Russian dialect does "орнуть" belong to?

OK, so your question have been answered: it's from the internet slang; but I'd like to slightly correct some assumptions made in the comments about how орать became a slang word. And oh my, where do ...
Thau's user avatar
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4 votes
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What is the etymology of "блондиться"?

In Polish, there is a noun błąd [bwɔ̃n̪t̪] 'mistake' to which there is an etymological cognate in Russian, блуд, 'fornication'. But Russian has other words formed from the root блуд which are not ...
Yellow Sky's user avatar
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3 votes
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Pronunciation of Г in regional accents

Fricative g is typical of the Southern dialect. The Southern Dialects are spoken around Tula, Ryazan, Oryol, Lipestk, Tambov and most of Kaluga, Voronezh , and Kursk Oblasts. These dialects are also ...
V.V.'s user avatar
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3 votes

Are there certain pronunciations that characterize the speech of speakers from former Soviet republics?

Ukrainian Russian is the only clearly identifiable one, a language variety unto itself somewhat like Irish English (and not to be confused with the Ukrainian language in the same way you also have an ...
Nikolay Ershov's user avatar
2 votes

Is "склизкий" still alive and doing well?

склизкий has some yucky undertone. When we mention a slug we can say "склизкий слизень" for example. But in the article it mean slippery (because of North Novgorod dialect) and the word is not used ...
Kaira's user avatar
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2 votes

Which Russian dialect does "орнуть" belong to?

Орать is the latest (mid-to-late 2010s) slang for loud laughter. It originated on the internet and is not tied to a particular region (not many things are, in modern urban Russian). The form орнуть ...
Nikolay Ershov's user avatar
2 votes

Rare/dialectal alternative instrumental case form -ом

I live in the Bryansk region and I've come across a similar dialect near the Belarusian border. Maybe that has something to do with it.
Folko85's user avatar
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2 votes
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Rare/dialectal alternative instrumental case form -ом

I'm not aware of particularly Smolensk-area dialects (and I know very little about them in general, to be quite honest), however, what you're describing is not that unimaginable. In northern group of ...
shabunc's user avatar
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1 vote

Rare/dialectal alternative instrumental case form -ом

I think it's a colloquial kind of declension (i.e. one of many deviations from established grammar rules observed in everyday speech). In my experience, native speakers use such forms occasionally ...
Ivan's user avatar
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1 vote

Which Russian dialect does "орнуть" belong to?

Used in Ukraine also since early 2000s in the meaning of laughter and I want to specify that it is not necessarily a sudden short laugh - it is used in a wider semantic range of a word laugh. Some ...
nextme's user avatar
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1 vote

Which Russian dialect does "орнуть" belong to?

I first met 'Орать' and 'Орнуть' used as a substitute to 'to laugh' by a person form city of Omsk (Siberia) in the early 2000s, way before internet culture grew on Russia's youth. Nowadays it's much ...
dad's user avatar
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1 vote

Which Russian dialect does "орнуть" belong to?

"Орнуть" is a slang, commonly used by young not-well-educated people. I would strongly recommend not to use it anywhere.
spbnative's user avatar
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1 vote

What is the etymology of "блондиться"?

The dialectic regional блондить originates from the idiom блыонды бить. In some dialects we observe idioms which are different in possessing either one or a combination of consonants in the first ...
V.V.'s user avatar
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1 vote

Are there certain pronunciations that characterize the speech of speakers from former Soviet republics?

That depends on how detailed you want to be. Even a native speaker will be surprised at the variety of dialects and nuances upon opening a linguistic atlas. The "чё" or "шо" that ...
Zeus's user avatar
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