12

Imparisyllabic Latin words (meaning words having an extra syllable in genitive compared to nominative) are usually cited in their genitive form, as it's usually a more accurate representation of the word's etymology. Church Slavonic authors chose to use Latin genitive stems for all Church Slavonic forms, including the nominative. That's why we have Venus (...


10

Why on Earth it should be? Just because in other languages -ato ending are OK for nouns? Why банан and not банана? Or кофе but not кофи? This is emotional part of an answer, and as of the facts - well, it was derived from French tomate (which is something mentioned in Russian wiktionary by the way) and in French it was already pronounced pretty much the ...


10

Большое количество заимствованных слов, обозначающих предметы одежды, неудивительно, если вспомнить, что мода в Россию, по крайней мере, с петровских времен, приходила из-за границы. Этим же объясняется и вытеснение заимствованными формами русских слов: Если одеваться по иностранной моде престижно, то Вы скорее наденете голландские брюки, чем русские портки. ...


10

Транскрипция только польских фамилий даёт в русском варианте "-ий", и если это делается через английский язык, то в случаях, когда польское происхождение носителя фамилии хорошо известно, например Збигнев Бжезинский. https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/Польско-русская_практическая_транскрипция В нашем же случае автор (по википедии) - немецкого происхождения.


9

I will agree with Aksakal, that many words ending in -ция have probably been imported from Latin or French. Although модерация might be imported from English, since it is a relatively new word used mostly in the internet and IT. Answering your question. No, not all words are translated by this rule. Many words do have such a counterpart, and the ones you ...


8

На самом деле, хотя в стандартном немецком эта часть футбольных ворот называется (во множественном числе) Torfposten, в австрийском немецком они часто так и называются - штанги (Stangen). Вот цитата из немецкой википедии: In Österreich werden Torpfosten oft als Stangen bezeichnet (В Австрии стойки часто называются штангами) Варианта два - в русском эту ...


8

It is very common as a book expression which saw a large drop in usage from early XX century. In speech you would expect it to be Спорим or Бьюсь об заклад when more ornate. But it's in everybody's passive dictionary for sure.


8

It's not English, it's also French and other languages which have words with Latin suffix -tio. It became -sion -tion in these languages. Russian probably borrowed directly from Latin, hence ция without "n" at the end.


8

From a reference book by Rozenthal, much trusted author: http://www.evartist.narod.ru/text1/24.htm §17. Географические и административно-территориальные названия 4.Части сложных географических названий пишутся с прописной буквы, причем соединяются дефисом, если они образованы: д) сочетанием иноязычных элементов, например: Алма-Ата («отец яблок»), Норд-Кап ...


8

Потому что Буковски - это иностранная фамилия, и ее склонять по русским правилам не принято. Нет русских фамилий на -и, которые бы склонялись в единственном числе. А Достоевский - русский писатель с русской фамилией, которую мы склоняем. Как Дарвин - с Дарвином, но Ленин - с Лениным. Разные правила для иностранных и русских фамилий.


8

Общая установка на то, что иностранные фамилии остаются иностранными, даже когда они морфологически прозрачны в силу происхождения из родственных славянских языков (или даже русского). Бывала и противоположная традиция, когда не имеющий никакой славянской этимологии* силач Eugene Sandow дотягивался до «Евгения Сандова», но мы живем при устоявшихся в ...


7

Oriental spiritual practices have not been that big part of everyday Russian life long enough for such verbs to emerge in everyday language other than in analytic form (делать + noun). However, Russian speakers practicing them of course do form and use such verbs. In a yoga class you can hear verbs like пранаямить ("practice Pranayama") or шавасанить ("...


7

I think the closest Russian term would be канцелярит (officialese). As defined by Большой толковый словарь: Сухой, невыразительный, заштампованный язык (первоначально - канцелярские бумаги). Unlike legalese, it's not intentionally obscuring, however it is also excessively used in legal and official papers and may be hardly understood by people not familiar ...


7

I think it is still unstable. Russian doesn't have [θ] sound, so it usually became [т] (ортофосфорный) or [ф] (Федора) or even [с] or [з] (Саус Парк). Definitely, it is not блутут now (nobody will understand you). I, personally, spell блутус or блютус. Generally speaking, here is my vision about how th is transcripted in Russian: Long-loaned Greek or ...


5

Words get borrowed into the languages not necessarily from the languages they originated in, not necessarily keeping their meaning, not necessarily the way they originally sounded and not necessarily once. In each separate case there is usually some kind of logic: e.g. you can trace step by step how Ancient Greek ἐλέφας (source of English "elephant") ...


5

In modern Italian she is Venere, in Latin one of the forms were Venĕris according to Italian Wikipedia. In Serbian and Bulgarian she is Венера. Looks like it's nothing very special about Russian. You should search for this fork earlier than Russian loan.


5

ru.wikipedia agrees w.r.t. -арь, referencing Antoine Meillet Le slave commun: *-arjь (суффикс профессии, отсюда рус. -арь) < прагерм. *-arjoz < лат. -arius "Аль" is not a single suffix. There's '-л-' in words like пада-л-ь, бы-л-ь, порос-л-ь (it's a suffix signifying a phenomenon; some words with -аль are here) then there's '-л-' in words like ...


5

Why a new term Doneness is a scale. Steak is not a traditional Russian dish; there are five commonly used degrees of doneness for steaks but only three established Russian translations (с кровью, средней прожарки, хорошо прожаренный). It makes sense to adopt the international scale instead of each chef inventing his or her own translations. "Cырой" in the ...


4

Yes, these words are cognates. According to etymolgical dictionaries, the Russian word рейс wasn't borrowed from German but rather from Dutch where it is known as reis. Both the German Reise and the Dutch reis have the same origin and are derived from Old High German reisa (“a setting out, expedtion, journey”) from Proto-Germanic *raisōną (“to set out, ...


4

Despite that Vasmer in fact ignores the words with “-арь” suffix, the comparison of terms having that suffix drops hints about it‘s latin roots: -ārius m (f. -āria, n. -ārium) See: псарь, свинарь, виноградарь, ключарь, чеботарь, ложкарь, штукарь, плугарь, пушкарь, косарь, кобзарь, библиотекарь, аптекарь, почтарь, корчмарь, волгарь (and it‘s derivative «...


4

Э was originally a deictic (meaning Hey, look!) particle есе / ѥсе in Old Church Slavonic that became attached to many pronouns: Такой — этакий Так — этак То — это Те — эти It was a common feature, present also in Ukrainian, Belorussian, and other languages, originating back to PIE. Ukrainian: ген (there) ген-ген (there afar) генто (day before yesterday) ...


4

Just like many word of German origin it came through Polish, here’s relevant quote from wiktionary (which, can not help but notice is almost always best starting point when you have a question about etymology): Borrowed from Polish cel (“aim, goal”), in turn from Middle High German zil. By the way, there’s a bunch of other relatively recent borrowing ...


3

The main objective is to say something that sounds like a Russian word, I think. Блютус is fine then. It's rather risky, but you may definitely say Синезуб — it would sound like real Russian word, and I'm sure about 90% of Russians (especially those who are familiar with the technology) will understand you. And it will cause some nice smiles too :)


3

These words can also be translated as модерирование администрирование трансформирование провоцирование In this case they would mean the process connected with this english noun.


3

I think it is, although I can't prove it, or maybe I can by comparing the number of originally Latin words used in an English sentence with their number in its translation into Russian. And it's explainable, I think, mainly by the fact that the territory of the eastern Slavic tribes was never subjected to direct Roman influence and influence of the Catholic ...


3

Steak can not be regarded as a Russian dish, even бишфтекс is not the same. That's why we have to borrow the terms together with the recipe. Those words are not considered to be Russian, and if you google "степени прожарки стейка", you will find English words written in Latin letters within Russian articles. These words are used as adverbs, which do not ...


2

Some additional examples that come to mind -- Ernest Hemmingway Hippy Happy End Hula Hoop Jimmy Hendrix Doctor House Audrey Hepburn


2

I'm going to answer in English since my Russian isn't good enough yet. This is not a coincidence, it's a conspiracy. ;) And it's even larger than just French and Russian. We must assume it is at least transeuropean, if not paneuropean. trouver (fr) = trovare (it) = finden (de) = находить (ru) = βρίσκω (gr) Same two meanings in all the above languages. ...


2

In Russian, Bluetooth (i. e. Bluetooth-технология) is used in >90% of cases. Less used is блютуз, and even less used is блютус. Below are the results of the search on Russian web-auction molotok.ru Bluetooth - 501 ads блютуз - 28 ads блютус - 6 ads There is also a jargon or colloquial expression голубой/синий зуб (and adjectives голубозубый, синезубый), ...


2

Блютуз or Блютус will be most appropriate. Nobody says Блутут in Russian:) You can find version Голубой Зуб in texts of humorous nature.


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