54

There's nothing special about Russian. In many European languages there's one word that can be used to state that something is highly esteemed and/or expensive. French - cher means both expensive (une voiture chère: an expensive car) and dear ("Mon cher ami": "My dear friend"). I'm citing French first, because I always speculated that the usage of дорогой ...


47

You have a very good teacher, Mitsuko, and I'm sure one day you will appreciate what he's doing for you. :) The dialogue seems to be grossly ungrammatical and to make little sense It makes perfect sense to a native speaker. The woman asks whether they shall cross the road (or not). The man points out that they can't cross now because the light is red. She ...


39

I suppose that your translation ‘a bout of hysteria’ is more about physiological process, which is uncontrollable. But the verb ‘закатить’ assumes a girl’s intention. So maybe ‘throw a tantrum’ would be better in this context.


35

There are a few different meanings in your examples. Let's try and unpick them. У меня, у нас can be used to express: Possession: у меня = мой, у нас = наш: У меня рука болит = Моя рука болит. У нас народ умный = Наш народ умный (your example #4) A patronizing / possessive way of referring to people, often your kids / spouses, etc. Он у меня ещё ...


35

It seems she said я та ещё щука. Тот ещё means "quite, some, hell of", as in "That's some vacation you spent with me", "That's quite a wife you have", etc: Скорее я могу быть генералом де Голлем, чем он ― секретарем райкома. Между прочим, он тот еще трус Твой Стрельников тот еще жук, и сам денег нагреб, и нам еще осталось. ...


33

Original meaning of еба́ть is to fuck. This root comes from Proto-Indo-European language where it had the same meaning (o̯i̯ebhoa̯ “I fuck”). The root later acquired some developments into the meaning “to beat”, (въеба́ть, вы́ебать, means to beat somebody), possibly either because it is common to beat somebody into the reproductive organs or because fuck is ...


30

The word "Да" has got various functions in Russian. In your example Иван да Марья (Иван и Марья) it is a conjunction which means "и". As a conjunction it can also mean "но" ("but") Солнце светит, да не греет ("The sun is shining, but it isn't warm"). In this case we put a comma in front of "да"....


29

Явтушенко is a family name based on personal name Явтух and suffix -енко ("son of"), so Явтушенко is "son of Явтух". There is also other family name that is more familiar to Russian ear and has the same origins - Евтушенко. Явтух is a short form of a name Евстихий which has Greek origins and is translated to Russian as "счастливый, преуспевающий". Seems ...


29

I'm native russian speaker. If you had video/audio call, then you most likely misheard her. It is not "Так что я тающая щука" It is "Так что я та ещё сука". It's not an idiom it's more like just an emotional expression, which can be translated like: "Well, I am a bitch" or "Well, I am bitchy" In regular context it ...


27

First of all, you translation is correct and I would not fail you for that. That said, да уж лежит там is a peculiar, if grammatically correct, to put "it's already lying there" in Russian. Russian does not omit pronouns as easily as, say, Romance languages do. There is a chance that this was a trick question, and уж in this context meant "...


24

There is a Russian word хлеба́ло wich is a vulgar way to say “mouth”. It is derived from the verb хлеба́ть, “to eat liquid food with a spoon; to drink”, this verb is colloquial and stylistically neutral. Xлеба́ло is formed by the non-productive suffix -л- which is used to form the names of instruments: сиде́ть (to sit) — седло́ (saddle) дыша́ть (to ...


23

Just homonyms.There's an older word, подкол 'joke' together with the verbs подколоть (perf.), подкалывать (imp.) 'to play a joke [on smb]', but here 'the joke' is aimed at a person to make laugh of them. Прикол is almost the same, only another prefix is kind of showing that the joke is neutral, that is not aimed at/against somebody. That is a mere ...


22

It is a real sentence, but the poster incorrectly used "не" where they should have used "ни". The correct form of the sentence is: Что ни день, то приключение! which means: Not a day passes without some adventure! "Что ни день" means "every day" but is more literally translated as "any given day" or "any passing day".


22

It’s a rhyming euphemism for сосни хуйца. The article by the link provided lists lots of similar euphemisms. All of them are born in Russian Internet culture, I would not expect an infrequent Internet user to understand it. Your particular phrase originates from «лососни тунца», which is a more obvious euphemism and a nonsense phrase, as there’s no verb «...


21

It's an example of a word which belongs to a quite interesting class of words – words of English origin which are used in a completely different way in non-English languages – or just forgotten. This is actually derived from English "flood" and it is a slang word which initially meant a specific form of DDoS attack – in Russian it evolved for describing ...


21

You are probably looking for “вепрь”. While understandable to a modern Russian speaker, it still has an air of “fairytale-ness”. I personally would just use “кабан”. I don't know how and why “кабан” got more popular in common speech, and I'm not sure, if there even is a reason.


20

Понаехать here is used in the sense 4 in Wiktionary: "to come in big numbers, not being welcome". It's usually used when talking of big cities, like Moscow or St. Petersburg, because that's where people go in big numbers, not being welcome by those who came into these cities in big numbers a year earlier. Normally, it's used in impersonal constructs: Во ...


19

Аж is indeed etymologically connected to даже, however has nuances in usage. When used with measurable quantities it means "no less than", "as many as", "whole" etc., mostly ironically: Бильярдов теперь на этом вокзале аж три. // Now, there are no less than three pool tables on this station. Живут же раки, говорят, аж до ...


19

It's apparently a film quote. It's a staple of army-related humour that officers have a problem speaking coherently. Это вам не это means something like, "This ain't the, you know", i.e. the second это is a filler word that just trails off.


19

For a person (and in Russian everything is a person), the Russian thought model makes no distinction between: the person's moral right to do something; the person's ability to do something (like, physical ability); the objective circumstances allowing or not for anyone to do something in a given situation. (Note that the circumstances are a person too!) ...


19

дорогой/ая is not only expensive, it's also dear, the word has at least two meanings Not only women are called дорогая in the sense of dear, men are addressed as дорогой as well, in formal correspondence or in formal settings, especially at solemn events. Colloquially these words either appear in dubbed foreign movies as a translation for dear, its ...


18

Well, it is just a grammatical gender indication. Доброе утро is "доброе" because "утро" is neuter in Russian. Добрый день and добрый вечер contain добрый since both "день" and "вечер" are masculine. Check out this article for further information. Still, there's one subtle issue I want you to be warned about. While it is grammatically valid to say "...


18

It's in Upyachka slang. Literally translated that would roughly evaluate into something like well, sorta kaboom. Provided your context I guess that would mean he had sent you something, or something bad happened, or he just decided to disappear forever. Anyways, I would consider unprofessional sending something like that with any intent. "короче" – a common ...


17

"Ой, все" - it is a very informal way to stop discussion. It is mostly used by women as a final argument in a dispute. Women always want to say the "last word" in any dispute but if they feel they don't have any more agruments they can say "Ой, все" and can even leave the room-))) If you hear "Ой, все" it usially means that you are right.


17

"Ещё" and "больше" intersect only partially and have a lot of usages that are by no means interchangeable. "Ещё" can mean: yet (like in "Я ещё не решил, идти ли мне в институт") again (like in "Поцелуй меня ещё". so far (like in "она ещё совсем ребёнок") something happened quite long ago (like in "замок был построен ещё в 9-м веке") there's still some ...


17

The verb "разойтись" in Russian has a lot of different meanings, including (see #16 and #17) of getting more and more excited, getting slightly out of control even, so imagine a corporate karaoke event, and one of your coworkers is drinking more and more while singing louder and louder. One can say about him: "Что-то у нас Семён Петрович ...


16

I daresay бедолага is not 100% synonymous to бедняга. Yes, both are used when one takes pity on someone. However, I think I can put my finger on at least two slight differences in usage. Firstly, бедняга is more likely to be used in a situation where the object has been unlucky in a particular isolated situation, whereas бедолага better describes someone who ...


16

This expression means something along the lines of "I'm done", meaning that someone is not willing to continue an argument. Quite often it implies that a person saying "Oй все" lost an argument. The phrase can also be used as a joke to mock such behaviour.


16

"Girlfriend" and "boyfriend" are most usually conveyed in Russian as девушка and парень (or молодой человек). Подруга usually means "girlfriend" as well but its meaning is somewhat less suggestive of a romantic relationship than that of девушка. As a male you do not call your female friend подруга, not without raising an eyebrow. Women, on the other hand, ...


16

Short: the meaning is "Nobody loves Russian tourists". Long This is a humoristically paradoxical sentence. Let's replace the last word: Нигде так не любят русских туристов, как в Париже. This one is quite simple: Nowhere are Russian tourists loved as much as in Paris. The first part implies that Russian tourists are loved everywhere, and the ending ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible