47

You have a very good teacher, Mitsuko, and I'm sure one day you will appreciate what he's doing for you. :) The dialogue seems to be grossly ungrammatical and to make little sense It makes perfect sense to a native speaker. The woman asks whether they shall cross the road (or not). The man points out that they can't cross now because the light is red. She ...


39

I suppose that your translation ‘a bout of hysteria’ is more about physiological process, which is uncontrollable. But the verb ‘закатить’ assumes a girl’s intention. So maybe ‘throw a tantrum’ would be better in this context.


35

There are a few different meanings in your examples. Let's try and unpick them. У меня, у нас can be used to express: Possession: у меня = мой, у нас = наш: У меня рука болит = Моя рука болит. У нас народ умный = Наш народ умный (your example #4) A patronizing / possessive way of referring to people, often your kids / spouses, etc. Он у меня ещё ...


35

It seems she said я та ещё щука. Тот ещё means "quite, some, hell of", as in "That's some vacation you spent with me", "That's quite a wife you have", etc: Скорее я могу быть генералом де Голлем, чем он ― секретарем райкома. Между прочим, он тот еще трус Твой Стрельников тот еще жук, и сам денег нагреб, и нам еще осталось. ...


29

I'm native russian speaker. If you had video/audio call, then you most likely misheard her. It is not "Так что я тающая щука" It is "Так что я та ещё сука". It's not an idiom it's more like just an emotional expression, which can be translated like: "Well, I am a bitch" or "Well, I am bitchy" In regular context it ...


11

I'm not a native English speaker, but from what I've heard, the word “hysteria” in modern English has a lot of unnecessary connotations, especially when applied to women, so perhaps your teacher meant that. I personally would translate the phrase “закатить истерику” into English as “to throw a tantrum”, and Multitran seems to argee.


9

Throw a hissy fit is the best translation for a colloquial usage equivalent IMHO.


9

I think you might be looking for широкий взгляд and узкий взгляд: Вроде бы женщины в своих суждениях о морали придерживались более широких взглядов, чем мужчины, но до конца это не доказано. …а владелец «Пенатов», несмотря на его наскоки на футуризм, (показался) — человеком достаточно широких взглядов, способным преодолевать предрассудки поколения и школы. ...


8

It is as grammatical as might be a conversation between two hillbillies mumbling to each other about going for a beer or two. It is also as natural and does make sense. Consider: X: So, are we crossing? Y: TF crossing, don't you see it's red? X: Nah I mean, like, eventually. Y: Eventually yes.


8

In Chekhov's settings there is little to no difference in the first approximation: both в кухне and на кухне mean location in a room or set of rooms used as a kitchen to cook food and maybe do the related stuff. However, в кухне refers to the kitchen room itself, while на кухне can point to the kitchen environment in a more general sense, not necessarily a ...


7

As the other answers mentioned the issue here is either your understanding of the Russian word истерика or the English word hysterics. In English hysterics is an archaic term for a psychological condition similar to a nervous breakdown but only applied to women. In the modern times it's mostly used as an exaggeration to describe a strong reaction such a ...


7

You're right, "seeker" is exactly what it means. Основная проблема, перед которой стоял ищущий человек, была вполне ясна – религия и атеизм // The main problem a seeker was facing, was very clear: religion or atheism. Любой спортсмен – это ищущий человек, который стремится стать быстрее, выше, сильнее // Any athlete is a seeker, aiming to become ...


7

This is a colloquial expression meaning “in what way”. I understand it as a witty reinterpretation of the abstract word «касаться» (to concern) in its original concrete sense (to touch). So you may try to translate the pun as on which side does it apply to you? if you wish.


6

Examples from question: (1) Он у нас умный слишком. Он у нас рабочий класс презирает. Смеется над ним. (2) А вот самый-то интересный вопрос – что было бы, если бы Гитлер у нас пошел по этому штрассеровскому пути и все-таки Германия прошла бы гражданскую войну. (3) Конец 40-х годов, Сталин у нас пишет великую статью про язык. (4) - ...


6

I think the phrase "to cause a scene" works to some extent.


6

This is so called дательный риторический (rhetorical dative) or дательный экспрессивный (expressive dative) which is paralleled by the Latin dativus ethicus (ethic dative). Historically, one of the dative's functions was to emphasise personal interest or involvement: Что ми шумить, что ми звенить давечя рано предъ зорями? // What noise is that (I wonder), ...


6

Whenever you are looking for a declension of specific word, start from wiktionary and switch to the Russian-language section, in the majority of cases there'll be a table with declensions. "Один"/"одна" are not exception: As you can see, it also can be одной лестницей ниже - this is actually the modern standard. "Одною" is ...


5

Actually the closest I can think of is just "to make a scene" - it's not necessarily a hysteria (though it might look like :), it easily can be not throwing a tantrum, so it's just make a scene, which, according to English dictionaries is "make a public disturbance or excited emotional display". In fact, we do have in Russian "...


5

The dialogue is grammatical from the linguistic point of view: this is how many native speakers do speak. It is however not the prescriptive grammar that one finds in grammar books. Indeed, this is far from the literary Russian or the Russian that Russians learn in school or speak in an educated society (this is why there is some difficulty in punctuating ...


5

I'll base the answer on the variants @Quassnoi has provided as all of them are viable. I'll elaborate a bit further. I think the phrase was either 'та ещё щука' or 'та ещё сука', it depends on the cultural background and the manners of the girl. The variant 'та ещё штука' is less likely as it is usually said in a diminutive way: 'та ещё штучка'. I'll add ...


5

The original meaning of the etymon was "excess, surplus". It is related to the words лишний "excess, spare" and лихва "loan interest". A word meaning "spare, excess" is a common metaphor for "evil, bad". Compare the French word excès, literally "excess", which also means "an outburst, something ...


4

In my opinion, "зашоренный" is a good candidate for close-minded in some cases. Here's definition and example from wiktionary: разг. состояние по значению прил. зашоренный; ограниченность восприятия ◆ В актере, которого нам предлагали, он не видел ничего высокого, никакой художественной перспективы, ничего достойного для себя. Меня тогда удивила и ...


4

"The most important lesson may be for those who receive political information. Sure, it is important to consider the source, but the content matters, as well. Our favorite messengers are sometimes wrong and our least favorite messengers are sometimes right. It’s sometimes worthwhile to pay a lot more attention to what is being said, and a lot less to ...


4

1 А good translation is Remind me why that has anything to do with you. What does that matter to you? What does it have to do with you? How's that any of your business? How is that your problem? 2 Никаким боком/местом means in no way. 3 When we have an idiom, no way should we translate it literally. But the dictionaries show a similar idiom in English. Тебя ...


3

The correct English translation of "ты ещё нас всех переживёшь" is "you're still going to outlive us all", which is obviously intended to mean "you still have much potential, much life force, so much that it will suffice for you to live longer than all of us". However, ещё is a polysemantic word, apart from its adverbial ...


3

Whenever you find that in dictionary two different adjectives are translated similarly, check how dictionary deals with corresponding nouns - sometimes it can give some hints at least. So, смех stand for "laughter", "laugh", забава stands for "fun" and "amusement". Similarly, смеяться is to laugh, забавляться is sort ...


3

"Ку́чка" means "a small pile", not a knot (pun unintended): Заду́мчиво глота́ю после́дний оре́х и сгреба́ю в ку́чку скорлу́пки. - Thoughtfully I swallow the last nut and swipe the shells into a pile. "В ку́чку" means "together", "into one place / pile" (the pile can be figurative): Пингви́ны сби́лись в ...


3

Can be translated as: Как построить масштабируемую архитектуру?


3

Происхождение слова "лихой" Этимологический онлайн-словарь Шанского Н. М. приводит два направления развития значений этого слова: Лихо́й. Общеслав. Того же корня, что греч. leiksanon «остаток». Суф. производное (суф. -s-) от *leik- «оставлять» (см. лишний). Исходно — «лишний, обильный» > «хороший» > «смелый, удалой» и т. д., с одной стороны, ...


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