47

You have a very good teacher, Mitsuko, and I'm sure one day you will appreciate what he's doing for you. :) The dialogue seems to be grossly ungrammatical and to make little sense It makes perfect sense to a native speaker. The woman asks whether they shall cross the road (or not). The man points out that they can't cross now because the light is red. She ...


35

It seems she said я та ещё щука. Тот ещё means "quite, some, hell of", as in "That's some vacation you spent with me", "That's quite a wife you have", etc: Скорее я могу быть генералом де Голлем, чем он ― секретарем райкома. Между прочим, он тот еще трус Твой Стрельников тот еще жук, и сам денег нагреб, и нам еще осталось. ...


33

The closest match I can think of is "тревожный звонок" / "тревожный звоночек" (more popular form), like in: Если твой парень никогда не приводит тебя в свой дом - это тревожный звонок. Here a some other (real-life) examples: «Авангард» завершил регулярку четырьмя поражениями и упустил второе место на Востоке, это тревожный звоночек. (&...


29

I'm native russian speaker. If you had video/audio call, then you most likely misheard her. It is not "Так что я тающая щука" It is "Так что я та ещё сука". It's not an idiom it's more like just an emotional expression, which can be translated like: "Well, I am a bitch" or "Well, I am bitchy" In regular context it ...


27

First of all, you translation is correct and I would not fail you for that. That said, да уж лежит там is a peculiar, if grammatically correct, to put "it's already lying there" in Russian. Russian does not omit pronouns as easily as, say, Romance languages do. There is a chance that this was a trick question, and уж in this context meant "...


22

It’s a rhyming euphemism for сосни хуйца. The article by the link provided lists lots of similar euphemisms. All of them are born in Russian Internet culture, I would not expect an infrequent Internet user to understand it. Your particular phrase originates from «лососни тунца», which is a more obvious euphemism and a nonsense phrase, as there’s no verb «...


19

Came into European languages from Greek via Erasmus' Latin translation: Ὁ δύο πτῶκας διώκων οὐδέτερον καταλαμβάνει Duos insequens lepores, neutrum capit (English: By chasing two rabbits, he catches neither; from Adagia 3.3.36). from Wikipedia: Adagia (singular adagium) is the title of an annotated collection of Greek and Latin proverbs, compiled during the ...


18

Не наебёшь — не проживёшь This literally means "if you don't fuck people over, you don't survive". The meaning of this proverb is slightly different from the Chinese one, as it's more about moral justification of cheating rather than pure utility, but otherwise I think it's a good analog. Elaborating on some suggestions from the comments: Не пойман — ...


15

Somewhat similar: «Не обманешь -- не продашь», that is, "no trick, no sale".


15

Quassnoi suggested in his answer that the key might be the homonym "уж", which can mean "already" and "grass snake," and this possibility made me so pissed off that I got brave enough to sent an email to the teacher. He was quick to reply and elected to respond in Russian: Во-первых, Вы не учли разницу между "отнеси" ...


15

I'm not sure "unscratchable itch" is something that applies equally well to both your examples, but if I were forced to use the same Russian idiom for both of them, I would go with мысль … не даёт покоя: Мысль о мисс X не давала покоя Y с тех самых пор, как она бросила его и вышла за другого. Чтобы сценарий вышел удачным, в нём так или иначе ...


13

But it is utterly unnatural and nonsensical to say that all men are idiots or bastards in the general sense, (…) It is nonsensical, at least by the modern-day Western standards, but it's also exactly what the idiom is supposed to mean. Its usual partner in crime is the idiom “Все бабы дуры”, which literally translates to “All women are stupid”. Yeah. Here ...


12

In general we say Какой прекрасный день, какой чудесный пень, какой чудесный я и песенка моя!(a famous song from the cartoon ) But there are variations: speaking negatively about a person we can use Какой подлец! And Каков подлец! Ну и подлец! Besides we use «Что за» plus noun, or noun phrase Ну что за шейка, что за глазки! Какие перышки, какой ...


12

Я полагаю, заплатить пару тысяч. Либо отсчитать пару тысяч. Здесь: отслюнить - как мне представляется, основано на том, что некоторые слюнявят пальцы, отсчитывая купюры. косарь - это тысяча.


12

Can't think of anything having quite that meaning but by way of extrapolation the following might work Кому война, а кому мать родна which means that someone's misfortunes are someone else's luck. Multitran doesn't give any natively Russian equivalents either aside from another extrapolated proverb Что русскому хорошо, (то) немцу смерть Both are ...


12

As @БаянКупи-ка suggested, I asked the player by sending him a message via the game server in order to find out which of the two versions suggested in answers is correct. It turned out none is. The player responded by sending me a selfie as an explanation. The selfie shows him consuming food at McDonalds. I am happy he is just a fast food lover, not a ...


12

It could be also "Тревожный знак". Like То, что нынешние санкции связаны с внутренней политикой Китая, это очень тревожный знак в санкционной войне между Соединенными Штатами и КНР. Тревожный знак для рубля: доллар перешел черту 70 руб./$. Главный транспорт столицы все чаще подводит пассажиров. Это тревожный знак?


11

The perception that a wild boar is violent and dangerous comes from hunting it. Russians have been hunting wild boars for food for thousands of years and still do. These animals are notoriously dangerous to hunt because not only are they very difficult to put down, they have a very thick hide that's hard to pierce and can take many shots to their body ...


11

He that spareth his rod hateth his son: but he that loveth him chasteneth him betimes. Proverbs, 13:24 Of course now it mostly used as hard irony, the society condemns both aggressor and victim for such thoughts. It does not really mean hitting, it can be about psychological pressure. Also it used humorously when boys with puberty just started can't ...


11

When you use red flag as mark that something is suspicious - then it's OK to translate as тревожный звоночек, or just подозрительно as other answers mentioned. Example: Если твой парень никогда не приводит тебя в свой дом - это тревожный звонок (это подозрительно). When you use red flag meaning to identify or draw attention to (a problem or issue to be dealt ...


10

I still think that this proverb is awful, however I can think of one or two expressions that at least partially have the same meaning. One is "победителей не судят" - the winners can not be judged. It means that if you overpowered your rivals it's already doesn't really matter how exactly you've won. It's attributed to Empress of Russia Catherine the Great ...


10

Давайте везде курить, что уж там, детям в лицо: депутат Госдумы. Here "что уж там" is very close to "whatever". Да что уж там, благодаря им выросли экономики целой полдюжины стран. Here's it's close to "let's be honest". И мне линк давайте, что уж там. Here it can be translated as - "Aaaaah, whaveter, give me the link" or "Ah, screw ...


9

"Давай напрямую"/"давай напрямоту" or "говори прямо" are good expressions, literally meaning "Speak directly", "be direct". "Напрямую" can be translated as "straight up". There is also very casual expression "давай по чесноку" where "по чесноку" is a replacement for "по-честному", meaning "let's be honest".


9

I have to type in 30 characters before I can write Ну ты понял


9

Ни пуха ни пера – это значит "ни зверя вам, ни птицы". Сначала это было напутствие для охотников, скрытое пожелание им удачи. "Недобрые слова" должны были услышать лесные духи, и тогда они уйдут и не будут мешать охоте (зачем повторяться, если дело уже сделано). А ответ "к черту" – это переадресация сказанного: пусть черт это тоже услышит и, конечно же,...


9

When you say that someone is кабан it's about him being huge, bulky and sometimes being strong is also implied, quite often it's used with adjective "здоровенный", like in "Да он же кабан здоровенный, куда тебе с ним тягаться". Depending on context, it can be said quite friendly or can have some negative connotations. The other word used more or less in the ...


9

When someone says "да что ты всё вертишься, у тебя что, шило в жопе" it doesn't actually means that ancient Slavic people used to insert awls into into their asses. It's a figure of speech. We do not have any evidence that this phrase came into existence because grass snakes were part of cuisine. There's a similar phrase (apart from "угорь" mentioned in ...


9

It's a general indication that the person you're talking to is not in the right condition to respond right now. The reasons could be numerous, including but not limited to: They're very upset with something. They're very mad at something. They're very tired. They're having a bout of other mental health issues. They're drunk or under an influence.


8

Pronoun какой (же), with же making a phrase more emphatic, would fit universally Какой прекрасный день! - What a beautiful day Какой негодяй! - What a scoundrel But in negative contexts какой sounds pretty sterile and mincing (unless said with a contemptuous intonation which doesn't translate through writing) and is usually given up in favor of вот (...


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