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14 votes
Accepted

The infinitive of "уймитесь"?

It's "уняться". Well, usually the answer supposed to be somewhat wider, but in this particular case that's virtually all that can be said) UPD: To make this answer slightly more informative, here's ...
shabunc's user avatar
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9 votes
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Почему так часто "ничего" а не "ничто"? (Why "ничего" and not "ничто"?)

Negation of existense (i.e. "no such thing") in Russian requires Genitive. Ничего is Genitive. That's it. Accusative Ничто is a special object. It isn't nothing. It's Nothing. But the difference may ...
Matt's user avatar
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8 votes
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Why is it "девяностОлетний", but "сорокАлетний"?

These are the rules for declining composits with the first numeral root. We use the genitive in this case but not a connecting vowel: Одиннадцать → одиннадцати Двадцать → двадцати Тридцать → ...
Clever Masha's user avatar
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7 votes
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'По окончании этапа' или 'по окончанию этапа'

В данном контексте (в значении "после окончания этапа") правильно: по окочании. Подробнее: ссылка1, ссылка2. По окончании — если мы говорим в контексте «после какого-либо события», тогда в конце ...
Dmitry's user avatar
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7 votes
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Where does the -и ending in "Ныне отпущаеши..." come from?

Yes it's the archaic form. In Old Russian it had been the form for the second person (one that is used with ты) - roughly speaking where we now have шь in modern Russian it was ши. in Old Russian (or ...
shabunc's user avatar
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6 votes
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Why does оставлять/оставить mean to leave when it literally means 'to put around'?

(a) Оставить does not mean "misplace". It can of course mean a related thing, forgetting/abandoning/leaving something behind, but that's not the same as "misplacing". You remember the location; you ...
Nikolay Ershov's user avatar
5 votes

Why do many military unit types have weird declension?

Zero ending in Genitive plural could be a remnant or influence of both Church Slavonic, where both forms seem to be equivalent, and Old Russian, where it was characteristic of the words we now inflect ...
Баян Купи-ка's user avatar
5 votes

Regarding the adjective "Христов"

I can't think of any others that look like it Tons. Отцов, дедов, братов etc.etc. I'm only familiar with -ов in modern Russian, where it is an ending for plural nouns or singular male surnames ...
Matt's user avatar
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4 votes
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Examples of compound words "hidden in plain sight"?

Well, that could be trickier than you think. "нет+(genitive)=не+есть" Actually "нет" goes from "нету" which is "не [есть] тут" (not here). "когда=кого+года", "всегда=все+года" This is a ...
Matt's user avatar
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4 votes

Regarding the adjective "Христов"

In Russian we have got possessive adjectives, which mean belonging to a person or an animal (singular ): мамина сумка, отцовы кроссовки, кошачьи следы, нянькины сказки, кровь Христова братовы ...
V.V.'s user avatar
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4 votes

Etymology of -ова in Russian surnames

It will be formed as the possessive form of a name or nickname: Иван: Иванова дочь Марья. Мороз: Морозов сын Василий. -а is a distinct morpheme — an ending denoting case. The masculine nominative ...
alamar's user avatar
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4 votes
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тупенькая meaning

It means thick (headed). Grammatically it is the word тупая with the suffix -еньк(ая) (-ая is ending) -еньк (-оньк) is a suffix of adjectives, adverbs and nouns which imparts them diminutive ...
Баян Купи-ка's user avatar
3 votes
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Времена в русском языке

В школе учили правильно: времен три. Плюс два вида, два залога, три наклонения. Слышал, слыхал, слыхивал - разные глаголы. Корень один, но связи между ними нерегулярные, примерно как между рука, ...
Sergey Slepov's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Are "из лесу" and "из леса" completely interchangeable?

Sort of yes, modification with adjective sounds ok here, like in "из тёмного лесу/леса", "из зимнего лесу/леса" - though I have to admit that most likely one will use adjective in ...
shabunc's user avatar
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3 votes

Why do many military unit types have weird declension?

Actually de-facto, form like гусаров, партизанов, солдатов are perfectly legal but have slightly different meaning. Here's a quote: Существительное, одушевлённое, мужской род, 2-е склонение (тип ...
shabunc's user avatar
  • 37.9k
3 votes

Why do many military unit types have weird declension?

One theory maintains that these exceptions from the regular pl.G. ending rule can most of the time be classified as collective nouns (not exactly the same phenomenon as well-known English collective ...
Avi Gordon's user avatar
  • 2,373
3 votes

Почему так часто "ничего" а не "ничто"? (Why "ничего" and not "ничто"?)

On my map the accusative of ничто is still ничто. Example: Из-за кризиса все облигации превратились в ничто. I cannot come with an example where ничто would be in accusative but having the form ...
Anixx's user avatar
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2 votes

Почему так часто "ничего" а не "ничто"? (Why "ничего" and not "ничто"?)

Building on Kovyl's post: a good example is the line from Olga Berggolts' poem at the Piskaryovskoe Cemetery, where many victims of the WWII blockade of Leningrad are buried: Никто не забыт, ничто не ...
Curt's user avatar
  • 604
2 votes

Dictionary form of the word "её"

её = her in all the senses, same as in English I see her = Я вижу её Her father = Её отец
Slava's user avatar
  • 259
2 votes
Accepted

What kind of word is this? "случи́вшемся"

Is it past perfective? It's a past participle from the perfective reflexive verb случиться ("to happen, to occur"), through the suffix -вш- (used to form active past participles), the ...
Quassnoi's user avatar
  • 54k
2 votes

What kind of word is this? "случи́вшемся"

This is the active past participle случи́вшееся from the verb случиться to happen, which declines like any neuter adjective. Here, it's in the prepositional singular after o and means about what ...
CocoPop's user avatar
  • 8,290
2 votes

What are uninfected forms and when should I use them?

Uninfected words There is no such thing in linguistics, simple as that. It's really easy to confuse it with "uninflected" (which is what I think did happen), but if this is indeed what you ...
Quassnoi's user avatar
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1 vote

What kind of word is this? "случи́вшемся"

Your translation is accurate. Here is how past participles are derived: The active past participle is derived from the past masculine singular: if the past masculine singular end in -л, replace -л ...
Sergey Slepov's user avatar
1 vote

Возможно ли смоделировать в русском истинно "Yoda style", чтоб он звучал так же страннейше как в английском?

Закономерность в Йодином порядке слов есть. Рему впереди темы ставит он. Не осознавая сами того, делают и подражатели его так. Удается вполне оттого и по-русски эту особенность передать.
Nikolay Ershov's user avatar
1 vote

What is the internal distribution of -ов/-ёв/-ев in the genitive plural and ой/-ёй/-ей in the instrumental singular?

The endings for feminine nouns in the instrumental case (with the exeption of those ending in -ь) are: -ой after hard consonants and -ей after soft consonants or vowels: Культура — культурой Пенсия — ...
V.V.'s user avatar
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1 vote

Времена в русском языке

Думаю, следует трактовать как разные ВИДЫ (АСПЕКТЫ) глагола. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grammatical_aspect https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/Вид_(лингвистика) https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/...
Баян Купи-ка's user avatar
1 vote

Времена в русском языке

Хотя в старославянском языке и были времена, которых в современном русском языке нет, это всё же не та ситуация. Такие глаголы называют видовыми дублетами (см., например, Сергей Карцевский, «Из ...
Roman Odaisky's user avatar
1 vote

'По окончании этапа' или 'по окончанию этапа'

Дело, конечно, не в буквах, а в том, что такие конструкции (сделать А после В) требуют предложного падежа. Сделать А -- по прибытии, по рассмотрении, по прошествии, по окончании, по получении, по ...
Avi Gordon's user avatar
  • 2,373
1 vote

Regarding the adjective "Христов"

To illustrate this short-form adjectival construction with last names in another setting, I have seen it used sometimes in math to name concepts after people: Артин --> артинов модуль (Artinian ...
KCd's user avatar
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