39

I suppose that your translation ‘a bout of hysteria’ is more about physiological process, which is uncontrollable. But the verb ‘закатить’ assumes a girl’s intention. So maybe ‘throw a tantrum’ would be better in this context.


31

The closest match I can think of is "тревожный звонок" / "тревожный звоночек" (more popular form), like in: Если твой парень никогда не приводит тебя в свой дом - это тревожный звонок. Here a some other (real-life) examples: «Авангард» завершил регулярку четырьмя поражениями и упустил второе место на Востоке, это тревожный звоночек. (&...


25

The word зелье comes from Proto-Slavic *zelьje "grass, vegetation" which kept its meaning in many Slavic languages, including Church Slavonic. It shares the root with the word зелёный "green", and the latter actually descends from the former. The meaning of "potion" is a later development. The word зелье in its original sense is ...


13

Well, it's quite straight-forward, "ездить" is always about going by car, by public transport etc. - in other words, it's never about walking. When one is saying "я езжу в это кафе часто" or "она ездит на остановку электрички" - it's never about going by foot, otherwise it would have been just "ходить". On the other ...


11

Well I am not a linguist but I will try to help you. "Вот ведь" have different meaning than just "ведь" When Russians say вот ведь in majority of causes it means "Just look what an interesting situation \ outcome"! For example: Вот ведь красивый закат! What a beautiful sunset! (we have here) Lets translate that sentence &...


11

I'm not a native English speaker, but from what I've heard, the word “hysteria” in modern English has a lot of unnecessary connotations, especially when applied to women, so perhaps your teacher meant that. I personally would translate the phrase “закатить истерику” into English as “to throw a tantrum”, and Multitran seems to argee.


11

It could be also "Тревожный знак". Like То, что нынешние санкции связаны с внутренней политикой Китая, это очень тревожный знак в санкционной войне между Соединенными Штатами и КНР. Тревожный знак для рубля: доллар перешел черту 70 руб./$. Главный транспорт столицы все чаще подводит пассажиров. Это тревожный знак?


9

Ему было ни за что не получить того, чего он хотел, или, по крайней мере, чего он хотел на словах. I agree with @Quassnoi, суждено is too deterministic, it is not needed here. But I'd change your то, что >> того, чего and the next что >> чего, too. Tого is the Genitive case after a negated verb, and чего is because this way it will resolve the ...


9

Throw a hissy fit is the best translation for a colloquial usage equivalent IMHO.


9

When you use red flag as mark that something is suspicious - then it's OK to translate as тревожный звоночек, or just подозрительно as other answers mentioned. Example: Если твой парень никогда не приводит тебя в свой дом - это тревожный звонок (это подозрительно). When you use red flag meaning to identify or draw attention to (a problem or issue to be dealt ...


9

I think you might be looking for широкий взгляд and узкий взгляд: Вроде бы женщины в своих суждениях о морали придерживались более широких взглядов, чем мужчины, но до конца это не доказано. …а владелец «Пенатов», несмотря на его наскоки на футуризм, (показался) — человеком достаточно широких взглядов, способным преодолевать предрассудки поколения и школы. ...


8

I'm going to omit marketing requirements in my answer (like the ability to put the localized name of the character into the company approved slot on a piece of merchandise, which is a big thing) and focus on the language. Spider-Man is a man who is also a spider. He literally "does whatever a spider can": climbs walls, shoots webs and eats flies. Whatever ...


8

Sometimes it's just a tradition. For one story, translator translates the name, and it sticks. For another story, the name is transliterated, and it sticks too. Mostly it depends on "catchiness" of the name. "Человек-Паук" is short and strong. "Человек-Летучая мышь" is long and a bit weak (in Russian culture, bats did not gather any sinister lore). A good ...


7

There's a saying небо в клеточку, друзья в полосочку ("checkered skies, striped friends") which is a metaphor for prison. This refers to the windows grills and prison uniforms. There's another, unrelated idiom черная полоса, literally "black stripe" or "black streak" which means "a rough patch" (in someone's life), and ...


7

I'm not really sure what kind of style your teacher is looking for. Двурушник and двуличный mentioned in the other answers are good translations, but they're not widely used these days. If your teacher is looking for modern slang, you'd better go with something among the lines of: Смотри не впишись в его мутки. Он разводила и кидала. Развести means to ...


7

As the other answers mentioned the issue here is either your understanding of the Russian word истерика or the English word hysterics. In English hysterics is an archaic term for a psychological condition similar to a nervous breakdown but only applied to women. In the modern times it's mostly used as an exaggeration to describe a strong reaction such a ...


7

This is a colloquial expression meaning “in what way”. I understand it as a witty reinterpretation of the abstract word «касаться» (to concern) in its original concrete sense (to touch). So you may try to translate the pun as on which side does it apply to you? if you wish.


7

«Тоже мне», with words exactly in this sequence, is a set phrase that means "not really", "as if" and is used to express irony. If you wanted to say "this is news to me too", that would be «Для меня это тоже новость».


7

«а ей что по спине, что по стене» can be approximately translated as "hitting her on the back is like hitting a wall". A similar English idiom is indeed "it was water off a duck's back". Yes, it is an idiom, meaning she doesn't care, and it's a good translation, meaning just the same. Google can't help with idioms.


7

The difference is in emphasis: У вас ли сыр? - Is the cheese with you? Есть ли у вас сыр? - Have you got any cheese? Ли usually follows the word being questioned: (1) questions the location of the cheese (with you or somewhere else?) (2) questions the existence of any cheese with you. One could also ask: Сыр ли у вас? - Is it cheese that you have? У вас ...


6

Ему было никогда не получить желаемого или того, что он за оное выдавал.


6

I think the phrase "to cause a scene" works to some extent.


6

Note that "red flag" in English lingo also might be not a metaphor but a term for a characteristic reason for alarm (Enter the term "flagged"). It literally may mean to mark something with red in some cases and related to practice using red tape, stickers ("page flags") or red bookmarks in document folders to signify something ...


6

Consider this translation: as if that's news


5

У меня есть версия, что это слово, не что иное как немного исковерканное русское выражение "Боже ты мой!". Оно почти так и звучит на слух если произносить очень быстро, или если оно произносится иностранцем. Так как время написания песни совпадает с визитом UB40, можно предположить что Виктор услышал как это выражение было произнесено кем-то из ...


5

"Разница между" you've googled, like in: Ты [вот]/[хоть] знаешь, в чем разница между джинсами и чинос? Is completely correct and definitely is a way to go. Apart from that one can just say: Ты знаешь, чем отличаются джинсы от чинос? or even (slightly ungrammatical but de-facto existing): Ты знаешь, чем отличаются джинсы и чинос?


5

The sentence in question implies that Voroshilov's requirements might not have been what he really wanted. I can think of a few ways to render this in Russian: Он так и не получил желаемого - точнее, требуемого. Его желания так и остались без удовлетворения - точнее, его требования. #2 is a bit more formal and better matches the style of the text.


5

Actually the closest I can think of is just "to make a scene" - it's not necessarily a hysteria (though it might look like :), it easily can be not throwing a tantrum, so it's just make a scene, which, according to English dictionaries is "make a public disturbance or excited emotional display". In fact, we do have in Russian "...


4

First of all, the main purpose of the title of a book, at least according to the publishers, is to sell it. That's why brilliantly translated books can have titles having nothing in common with the original. That said, you're not alone. Here's a quote from the preface to one of Russian publications, by the way titled Напрасные победы: Однако несколько слов ...


4

In my opinion, "зашоренный" is a good candidate for close-minded in some cases. Here's definition and example from wiktionary: разг. состояние по значению прил. зашоренный; ограниченность восприятия ◆ В актере, которого нам предлагали, он не видел ничего высокого, никакой художественной перспективы, ничего достойного для себя. Меня тогда удивила и ...


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