16 votes
Accepted

Describe a Language Without the Noun for "Language"

Yes, it is quite common in conversational speech: Он знает английский. = He knows English. Она предпочитает русский. = She prefers Russian. Note that language names or nationalities are not ...
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14 votes
Accepted

"Vrra" is a hispanization of which Russian word?

The salutation Ура! Ура! Ура! repeated three times (троекратное ура) is a usual greeting in the army used during parades, official meetings and performed by a chorus of military men. While being ...
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  • 20.5k
10 votes
Accepted

What is this odd military salute-like gesture?

This is воинское приветствие ("military salute"). When standing in present arms position, the military salute is performed by assuming position of attention, looking the senior in the face and ...
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  • 47.6k
8 votes

What is this odd military salute-like gesture?

"Ravnenie na" Равнение на... Something like "alignment to" This means all soldiers must look at a certain mark, most common are Alignment to the left / right / tribune / commander. You can see this ...
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7 votes
Accepted

Specific use of the world "молодец"

I'd say it is not the best choice. "Молодец" has a slightly patronizing tone: it is OK to use it to your children and friends, maybe colleagues and subordinates. However, if an adult person is not ...
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  • 5,120
6 votes

Is "Да, доброе утро." normal Russian?

It makes no sense as a standalone sentence. One can definitely think of a situation in which these two sentences might sound normal or at least not unnatural. For example: (after a conversation) Ну, ...
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  • 4,194
6 votes

Casual Terms of Endearment in Greetings

You may use "Здравствуйте" (Hello) or "Доброе утро/Добрый день/Добрый вечер" (Good morning/Good afternoon/Good evening) to greet any person you know or do not know, this is more of respectful greeting ...
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5 votes

Is "Да, доброе утро." normal Russian?

An example where "да" answers a question, not related directly to "доброе утро". The first speaker is not sure the usual greeting will be appropriate (imagine a phone call to a ...
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  • 11.8k
5 votes
Accepted

What are the fuller expressions of the Russian equivalents to some common festive greetings (e.g., Happy Birthday, Happy Easter, Happy New Year's)?

We commonly use two structures for congratulations and wishes: • поздравлять с чем-то (Instrumental) • желать чего-то (Genitive). The case used depends on the verb, and should be learned by heart. ...
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  • 20.5k
4 votes

Can one say "до следующего" or "до следующего раза" as a farewell?

"До следующего" feels incomplete and wrong. "До следующего раза" means not "until next time", but rather "until next occasion/event". As a farewell, it is OK to say to a person/a group of people who ...
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  • 1,021
4 votes
Accepted

Can one say "до следующего" or "до следующего раза" as a farewell?

I haven't encountered its use in this sense. Usually it's said when some business is left undone and is expected to be completed or resumed next time around. What can be said though is до скорого! (...
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4 votes

Is "Да, доброе утро." normal Russian?

Is that considered normal Russian, as if someone were seriously evaluating whether the morning was good or not? No, of course not. But "да" in Russian doesn't always mean plain "yes". Here it ...
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  • 15.2k
4 votes

"Vrra" is a hispanization of which Russian word?

Hurrah! From Russian Wikipedia: Ура́ — восклицательное междометие, употребляющееся в качестве торжествующего восклицания, выражающего восторг, радость, общее воодушевление, а также в качестве ...
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  • 141
2 votes

Casual Terms of Endearment in Greetings

"Adding a term of endearment" to a greeting is not much common in Russian except for the close relations. Usually you may choose between several forms of greeting (like 'Добрый день', 'Здравствуйте', '...
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  • 15.2k
1 vote

How to address people in the street?

There’s one more way — none, that is without any special word. Works for me. Just make your speech self-attractive and addressive. А не подскажете… Though initial А above is also an addressing ...
1 vote

How to address people in the street?

Women in post-Soviet countiries are still rather sensitive about their age. Some middle aged ladies here might feel offended when addressed "zhenschina". Sometimes a little bit flattering form of ...
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  • 11

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