13

You could say: Переверните и те и другие песочные часы (одновременно). The numerals два, три, четыре, оба don't play well with plural-only words like часы, весы, брюки, ножницы, сутки. You can easily say "25 суток" but there is no good way of saying the same for 24. These numerals govern genitive singular which plural-only nouns don't have. The ...


12

Nominative doesn't work for the same reason it doesn't work in this English statement: *The dress is red colour. But we can make it work using 'of': The dress is of red colour. I don't know why English loses the 'of' when the statement is converted into a question: What colour is this dress? Other languages keep it: De quelle couleur est cette robe? ...


11

The thing is in Russian there are tens of different types of noun declensions, the most well known and widely accepted classification of such patterns is one that had been assembled by Andrey Zaliznyak, a famous Russian linguist. According to this classification, the word "сноска" belongs to 3*a type of Russian nouns. That is: the stem of the word (this ...


10

Стоить может управлять винительным падежом, «стоит одну копейку», но может управлять и родительным, когда речь идёт не о денежной стоимости, а о ценности, важности, т. е. в переносном значении: «Это стоило ему многих усилий». В выражении дорогого стоит «дорогое» значит «что-то дорогое», и может, в принципе, относиться к чему угодно, в зависимости от ...


8

With "Налей мне..." any of the three options can be used: ... чаек. Pour me THE tea. ... чайку. Pour me SOME tea. ... чайка. Same as чайку, more preferred if you are younger. Partitive (чайку) and Genitive (чайка) have almost completely merged in modern Russian with the genitive taking over: in Купи сахару/сахара, меду/меда, порошку/порошка the ending -...


7

Или́й. Вы же не будете пытаться образовать форму Марей от Марья или Дарей от Дарья, но возьмете формы Марий и Дарий от полногласных Мария и Дария. Пока без источников. Так что возможно, это не более, чем мое добросовестное заблуждение, но мне до сего дня в голову не приходил иной возможный вариант.


6

The disappearing vowel is called a fleeting / mobile vowel («беглая» гласная). Some words have them, most don't. If a noun has a fleeting vowel, then it will obey these rules: A fleeting vowel can only appear between two consonants (й being a consonant). It is always the last vowel in the stem of the word. A stem is the part that is left when throwing away ...


6

The explanation is very simple - you must use genitive after больше and меньше as well as after много and мало or telling an exact number (у меня десять пальцев и сто тысяч волос).


6

Old Russian used endings -ъ, -ь for nouns with historical -o stem in gen. pl.: изъ Варягъ въ Грѣкы, изъ Грѣкъ по Днепру, святыхъ отецъ etc. This means the modern zero-ending in words like татар, армян, грузин etc. is the "right", etymologically justified one. The ending -овъ was initially used only for the nouns with historical -u stem. There were but a ...


6

There are different meanings of the word-- one of the reins",a long, narrow strap attached at one end to a horse’s bit, typically used in pairs to guide or check a horse in riding or driving, and a cause,a reason. ПО́ВОД, -а, предл. о по́воде, в поводу́; мн. пово́дья, поводьев м. Ремень, прикреплённый к удилам и служащий для управления лошадью. Вести лошадь ...


6

It's поводов. Поводьев is the genitive of a pluralia tantum (=no singular, like "scissors") noun поводья, meaning "reins". EDIT: People have pointed out in the comments that поводья does get used in the singular, and I stand corrected. It's rather a case of having two plurals according to the meaning, as with лист => листы "sheets" or листья "leaves". In ...


6

I am not sure about the exact rules. But maybe with example it can be more understandable. For instance, if you want to say "A person who wants an apple", it can be Человек, который хочет яблоко. or Человек, который хочет яблока. First one is accusative case, second - genitive. They both mean that a person wants to have an apple. But there is a slight ...


6

It's a legacy of "ждательный" case (sorry, I don't know its Latin name). It is used in the sentences after the verbs "ждать", "хотеть", and others that have similar sense. Sorry to say, but in modern Russian, there is no strict rule of using it. You just have to memorize. Sometimes you can use both accusative and genitive forms 'Я хочу мороженое' or 'Моя ...


6

Is there any general rule in Russian that regulates cases when direct objects can switch from Accusative to Genitive? Not in a perfectly codified form, not that I know of. Rosenthal has a whole chapter in his guide, called Падеж дополнения при переходных глаголах с отрицанием which boils down to these three major cases: Родительный падеж, имеющий в ...


5

As with other nouns ending with the diminutive suffixes -ок and -ка, the -о- in the suffix is fleeting. It falls in the penultimate position and retains in the ultimate: пал-∅-ка - палок носок - нос-∅-ка This is a trace of so called reduced vowel ъ which historically was in the suffix: палъка / палъкъ > палка / палок носъкъ / носъка > носок / носка ...


5

Zero ending in Genitive plural could be a remnant or influence of both Church Slavonic, where both forms seem to be equivalent, and Old Russian, where it was characteristic of the words we now inflect differently. § 12 Существительныя на ъ, съ предшествующею согласною в, б, п, м, н, л, р, с, т, д, з, г, к, х, суть рода мужескаго, и склоняются слѣдующимъ ...


5

The genitive is because of не. Я видел ваш чемодан but Не видел я вашего чемодана! (Не видел я ваш чемодан! is also correct.) Она прожила семь лет but она не прожила и семи лет Она не дожила трёх месяцев до ста лет.


5

"Сейчас у меня есть мало времени" sounds grammarically correct, but it is lexically strange. We don't say so. It can fall into two meanings, each of them expressed separately. 1) I am short of time = I don't have enough time. У меня мало времени. That really means that I don't have time. 2) I have some time, I can do something quickly. У меня ...


5

Rosenthal et al., "Пунктуация и управление в русском языке": хотеть чего и (при конкретизации объекта) что. — Хочешь золота али жемчугу? (Лермонтов). — Хочу только свою книгу. This means that verbs like хотеть, требовать, ждать etc. require genitive when the object is indefinite and accusative when the object is definite (already mentioned in ...


5

In Russian, the question about the color of the dress has at least 3 possible answers: (1) Платье красное. ~ Красное платье. (2) Платье красного цвета. ~ Красного цвета платье. (3) Цвет платья – красный. ~ Красный цвет платья. Now let us see how we construct a question to get an answer of type (1), and how we do it for types (2) and (3). In (1) красное is ...


4

It is so called отделительный падеж, which is in most cases same as родительный падеж. Принеси мне фрукты - bring me fruits. Принеси мне фруктов - bring me some fruits. You may use both, but using отделительный падеж is bit more polite. When you buy something, you should use accusative. Sometimes, отделительный падеж is different from родительный падеж. ...


4

Why is "вострые и недоверчивые" in nominative? Does 'два' not govern a genitive singular? It does govern sg. gen. for nouns, but may govern both gen. and nom. for the adjectives defining them. Rosenthal et al., #193.1: При существительных мужского и среднего рода, зависящих от числительных два, три, четыре (а также от составных числительных, ...


4

It seems you are aware of the main and most frequent usage of чего meaning что (colloquial). That's not the case with your sentence. Чего морочить голову?(What for, why)--Why should you worry about it? Another frequent usage is an adverb meaning what for and why ЧЕГО́ Чего я туда пойду? Чего с ним разговаривать? (т. е. незачем). Why,what's the ...


4

The use of Genitive (which is rather Abessive) is linked to the negation of the verb. The quoted phrase does sound idiomatic (as Abessive case does in Russian), but it would still sound right if instead of Abessive Accusative was employed ...умерла в 1959 году, не дожив до ста лет всего лишь трИ месяцА.


4

I would assume that "девушка" in these sentences stands for someone's girlfriend though it could be some other girl. машина девушки is most simple – "my girlfriend's car" машина у девушки is usually used as a part of a sentence. Like "а что за машина у девушки?" — "What kind of car does your girlfriend have?" Or "моя машина сейчас у девушки" — "My car is ...


4

"Сколько" – as a word denoting the quantity of something – takes a genitive noun by default. An associated genitive noun (like "детей") is often separated from "сколько" rather than being placed immediately following "сколько". In one of the simplest examples, "How old are you?" – while it is perfectly acceptable to place "сколько" and the associated ...


3

Shouldn't it be in Genitive, seeing as it is "possessed" by her? This is not how genitive works. It marks the possessor without modifying the possessee in any way. "Man" is in Dative case. ("Husband" actually; "man" is мужчина.) Is this because he is the one the verb is "acting" upon, i.e. the receiver of the action or is it another rule, governing ...


3

Actually de-facto, form like гусаров, партизанов, солдатов are perfectly legal but have slightly different meaning. Here's a quote: Существительное, одушевлённое, мужской род, 2-е склонение (тип склонения 1a((2)) по классификации А. А. Зализняка); в род. п. мн. ч. допускается форма гуса́р (преимущ. при собир. знач.) и гуса́ров (преимущ. при обознач. ...


3

One theory maintains that these exceptions from the regular pl.G. ending rule can most of the time be classified as collective nouns (not exactly the same phenomenon as well-known English collective nouns, by the way). They include: ethnic groups (башкиры - башкир, грузины - грузин) military formations fruit and veg (баклажаны - баклажан, помидоры - ...


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