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23 votes
Accepted

What nuances does the term "тугрик" have?

It usually metaphorically means "some obscure local currency", hardly known and hardly usable outside the country of origin; "some kind of monetary surrogate of limited use and ...
Quassnoi's user avatar
  • 53.9k
23 votes
Accepted

Why do Russians call a joke a stake (прикол)?

Just homonyms.There's an older word, подкол 'joke' together with the verbs подколоть (perf.), подкалывать (imp.) 'to play a joke [on smb]', but here 'the joke' is aimed at a person to make laugh of ...
Yellow Sky's user avatar
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18 votes
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Use of "Kamchatka" to represent any poor, faraway place

I agree with Artemix in most things (but not all), just writing my own response to provide more details. First of all, in my opinion, (as Artemix already had said) Kamchatka does not have the meaning ...
farfareast's user avatar
  • 2,128
18 votes
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Meaning of "кагбе пыщъ"?

It's in Upyachka slang. Literally translated that would roughly evaluate into something like well, sorta kaboom. Provided your context I guess that would mean he had sent you something, or something ...
ttaaoossuuuu's user avatar
  • 2,252
18 votes
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"Working on a knee"

Could that be 'сделано на коленке'='made on the knee'? This is said when some result was made paying less time to the process and having lower quality potential. Like if you could not (or felt lazy to)...
Makaleks's user avatar
  • 589
17 votes
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What is the meaning of "по хулиганке"?

(Haven't heard or read the song, so it's a guess). Most probably, it's a criminal jargon, where "хулиганка" stands for "УК РФ Статья 213. Хулиганство". See also Хулиганство in Wiki....
tum_'s user avatar
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15 votes

"Working on a knee"

It's на коленке - 'to make something crudely, without using any fancy tools', a botch job. Сделано на коленке literally means 'made on the lap'. It's not specific to aviation.
Sergey Slepov's user avatar
13 votes
Accepted

"Норм чувак" meaning

Is it a Норм чувак (1) or Норм, чувак (2) (the latter has comma, which means addressing to чувак)? In a first variant Норм is a short form of нормальный (acceptable, satisfactory, good), the second ...
igorp1024's user avatar
  • 316
12 votes

Is "с днём рождения, старый пердун" acceptable?

Depends on the terms you're on with this person, because this is quite offensive, i mean it could be taken as a friendly banter by a good friend and as an insult by a stranger. I think it's as strong ...
Баян Купи-ка's user avatar
12 votes

Use of "Kamchatka" to represent any poor, faraway place

Kamchatka since early years of 18 century was used as a place for sending politically disloyal people to exile. So, in the classroom a teacher sent bad pupils to the "exile" - to the rear seats of the ...
Artemix's user avatar
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11 votes

Use of "Kamchatka" to represent any poor, faraway place

I will provide my answers for some of your questions. Why Kamchatka and not Kad'iak nor Ross, which are farther away? Kamchatka is a well known region of Russia. I am sure it will be very hard to ...
VL-80's user avatar
  • 281
11 votes
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Что значит "Че ты паришься"?

It means something like "Why are you worried?" or even "Why are you giving a sh*t?" due to informality of the phrase. Figurative meaning of "париться" comes from sweating while steam bathing like ...
Dmytro's user avatar
  • 126
11 votes

"Horseradish, why are you fucking?"

'Хрен' is just one of the euphemisms for penis. So "хрен тебе" is essentially the same as "хуй тебе". It doesn't have anything to do with horseradish or its taste or its value. Just like 'freak' has ...
AR.'s user avatar
  • 1,750
10 votes

Is there a Russian expression used when both sides know they are lying?

The BBC did this a while ago, after which it can officially be considered the Russian language's mythmaker-in-chief. They took a colourless and generic Russian term for camouflage, маскировка, and ...
Nikolay Ershov's user avatar
10 votes
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К какой части речи относится слово "го" из молодёжного сленга?

Го ничем по формальным признакам не отличается от айда. Которое считается междометием.
Nikolay Ershov's user avatar
10 votes
Accepted

Сорьян = sorry?

It's way more frequently "сорян" rather than "сорьян". There's no double entendre, pun or word play of any kind here - there's zero references to "сор" - it's just a ...
shabunc's user avatar
  • 38k
9 votes

Is "с днём рождения, старый пердун" acceptable?

Don't! You will definitely spoil the celebration. Or at least remind that person of his age. Do you know the meaning of the last word? I bet you don't. Look it up in your dictionary. We don't ...
V.V.'s user avatar
  • 21.6k
9 votes

What nuances does the term "тугрик" have?

The term as a reference to exotic currency was widepread during times of Soviet international contracts. Since nineties, the meaning became broader. Phonosemantically and similar to cockney rhyming ...
Manjusri's user avatar
  • 4,492
9 votes
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What is ништяк?

Ништяк is a nominalization of ништо, which is a colloquial pronunciation of ничего. Ничего, in its turn, means "not bad, good enough".
Quassnoi's user avatar
  • 53.9k
9 votes

Why do Russians call a joke a stake (прикол)?

Those words are definitely related. The thing is that the relation is not direct. Let's start with колоть. It has two major meanings – to chop (when talking about wood), and to prick. The word кол ...
Alissa's user avatar
  • 2,809
9 votes
Accepted

Is there a shorter or more colloquial word for "pet"?

There is the word питомец (etymologically, "the one being fed"), but it has other meanings, it's less popular than домашнее животное, and, if anything, it's more bookish. In compound words, ...
Quassnoi's user avatar
  • 53.9k
8 votes

Is "с днём рождения, старый пердун" acceptable?

Depends on the person's sensitivity and sense of humour really. If in doubt, don't. Anyway, you might find this useful: старый пердун has a Soviet-era slang form, старпёр (parodying the Communist ...
Nikolay Ershov's user avatar
7 votes
Accepted

What do ")" or multiple ")))" mean in an internet conversation?

Here are some links on this topic: https://www.reddit.com/r/russian/comments/2p55os/why_do_a_lot_of_russian_people_use_smiley_faces/ https://www.reddit.com/r/russian/comments/1ppdyf/russians_and/ ...
KCd's user avatar
  • 4,984
7 votes

What do ")" or multiple ")))" mean in an internet conversation?

It's a smiley :-) Lots of people are too lazy to type it. Multiple "))))" don't represent laughter — it's just a friendlier smile. :))
Abakan's user avatar
  • 4,319
7 votes

Can you use the word "муть" in a conversation, or is it a profane word?

This word does not have a negative connotation. The usage of some of its meanings is less popular nowadays (like the one in your example), while the most popular meaning (something that does not make ...
Darya Shcherbakova's user avatar
7 votes
Accepted

What is the meaning of this Russian profanity?

Ёпта is a lax rendition of ёб твою мать (literally, "(I) fucked your mother"), which can serve as an interjection or a filler phrase in quite a variety of cases. "Ёпта мохнатка" is ...
Quassnoi's user avatar
  • 53.9k
7 votes

Russian slang: "the letter Х"

It's a cliché joke. — Как дела? — На букву "х", но не "хорошо" // "How are you?" "It's an f-word... and I don't mean 'fine.'" In Russian, we have the slang ...
Quassnoi's user avatar
  • 53.9k
7 votes
Accepted

Russian equivalents of some English idioms

Keep your shirt on can be translated as He кипятись! or Не выходи из себя! or Придержи коней! or Остынь! And as for the second one, you can say sunshine as солнышко, which can be used sarcastically. ...
V.V.'s user avatar
  • 21.6k
6 votes
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What are the different forms of "косарь"?

"Это двухкосарёвый вопрос на Stack Exchange русского языка" will immediately give you away as a non-native speaker who imporperly tries to use some Russian slang. "Косарь" is used only for amount of ...
shabunc's user avatar
  • 38k

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