9

It's not irregular but all you can do is just to memoize such cases. While the ст -> т happens in some verbs like "плести"/ "плету", "цвести"/"цвету", "мести"/"мету" for instance, a change to д is not that rare as well, check out for instance: блюсти / блюду брести / бреду красть / краду прясть / пряду So it's not something exotic. Here's a small ...


7

I'm not aware about a verb any native speaker would think of immediately. Пиздеть is not one of them. These exceptions have -е-/-а- in their infinitive endings and unstressed -и- in personal forms. The fact that the -и- is unstressed is crucial, because it is exactly what makes it the source of potential mistakes. The -и- in the personal forms of пизде&#...


4

Everyone who learned in Russian school tried to memorize this list of irregular verbs by means of a verse like this, where the actual order can vary to some extent (but usually any version starts with "гнать"). All this verses are similar in one thing - it's about 11 verbs, not 12. Apart, of course, from obvious derivative like "изгнать", "вытерпеть" etc. ...


4

Глаголы совершенного вида не имеют настоящего времени. Другими словами, когда мы хотим использовать настоящее время, мы всегда используем ближайший по значению глагол несовершенного вида я отправил - я отправляю - я отправлю.


4

Категория времени в русском языке существенно отличается от западноевропейских языков, так что не нужно искать аналогию там где её нет. В частности, ничего соответствующего ни давнопрошедшему, ни ближайшему прошедшему времени у русских глаголов нет. Предложение "Я отправил письмо" может соответствовать как "I have sent the letter", так и "I had sent the ...


3

У совершенных глаголов просто нет настоящего времени. Можно сказать, что они обозначают бесконечно короткие события. Они не соответствуют виду perfect, скорее simple (не точно, но вид continous всегда, пожалуй, переводят как несовершенные глаголы, а совершенные глаголы - как вид simple). Present perfect continous переводят как несовершенный вид прошлого (...


3

Мне хочется is for wishes you can't control: Мне хочется спать. = I need a nap. Хочется съесть чего-нибудь. = I want/need to eat something. Что делать, когда хочется сладкого? = What to do when you're craving sugar? Хочу is for your conscious wishes/decisions: Хочу в Париж!


3

Видеть isn't strictly speaking an exception as it's not alone. Besides брить another genuine exception from the 2nd conjugation verbs is стелить. Some infinitive forms of perfective and imperfective verbs differ not in prefix but in suffix, e.g.: принять-принимать (+ other prefixes), найти-находить (+ other prefixes), убить-убивать(+ other prefixes), ...


3

This is because of the rule already in Proto-Indo-European: if a word had a root ending in -d- or -dh- and a suffix starting with -t-, then an -s- sound would be inserted in between. For instance, the PIE had roots e̯es- "to be" and "e̯ed-" "to eat", they had forms e̯edsti "eats" and e̯esti "is", which both gave the coinciding Russian form есть. Similarly,...


2

According to the "Правила русской орфографии и пунктуации. Полный академический справочник" (под редакцией Лопатина): Глаголы на −еть – непереходные 1-го спряжения – имеют значение ‘стать каким нибудь, приобрести признак’, например, "обессилеть". while Глаголы на −ить (в 1 м лице и отсутствует) – переходные 2-го спряжения – имеют значение ‘...


2

"хотелось" - means "I wanted it, but not so much to take any serious actions to achieve it (or had no way to achieve it)". And yes, you're right: it near "хотелось бы", but in the past tense. "хотел" has a wider range of meanings. It may be synonymous with "хотелось" (using "Я" instead of "Мне"), but it may also mean a more real desire that you actually ...


2

Another way to know is to first identify if the verb is 1st or 2nd conjugation. 1st conj verbs have -ешь, ет, -ем, etc. 2nd conj verbs have -ишь, -ит, -им, etc. For most 1st conj verbs remove the -ть -ти of the infinitive. If the resulting (present tense) stem ends in a vowel add -ю -ют: читаю, делают, теряю, теряют, старею, стареют. There are some high ...


2

-ю normally indicates a verb stem ending with a soft consonant (in case of читаю it is читаj-). -у indicates a verb stem ending with a hard consonant. However, it not always works this way. Zaliznyak grammatical dictionary (online version) identifies some regular patterns that may help you to figure out how to form 1st person singular: Verbs ending with ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible