21 votes
Accepted

Is there an unstressed ё?

There are several words with unstressed ё: (Трёх-/Четырёх-) (-мéрный/-этáжный/-я́русный/-уго́льный/-колёсный/...) - two stresses: ё and other syllable. (Трёхсо́т-/Четырёхсо́т-) (-мéрный/-этáжный/-...
Dmitry's user avatar
  • 8,456
12 votes

Are there non-stress-related homographs in Russian?

Конечно is normally pronounced with [ш] for ч to mean 'of course' and with [ч] to mean 'finite': множество конечно, 'the set is finite'.
Sergey Slepov's user avatar
11 votes

Does anyone know of a simpler way to add accents to Cyrillic vowels than what is typically found online?

In addition to the previous answer, I'd like to suggest the method described in this blog. This method doesn't use a separate program (MS Word) but uses a pre-installed software available on any ...
11 votes
Accepted

"Критический": How should it be prounounced?

I love questions like these, they uncover small quirks that even most native speakers aren't aware of. The stress is on the second syllable, and sounds like it. There's more at play at Forvo and ...
Nikolay Ershov's user avatar
11 votes

Does anyone know of a simpler way to add accents to Cyrillic vowels than what is typically found online?

This method only requires 5 keystrokes and no mousing around. You'll need a keyboard with a numeric keypad to use it. Make sure NumLock is ON. Type the vowel e.g. а. Press and hold the left Alt key. ...
11 votes

Is there an unstressed ё?

Short answer: the stress is on -сот; you may put a secondary stress on трёх- This is a compound word. In compound words, generally the second part is stressed, but first part may have a secondary ...
AlexVB's user avatar
  • 1,782
10 votes
Accepted

Pronunciation of "часа"

What is the right way to stress the word часа? The "right" one is ча́са, however, the most frequently used combinations, such as, two hours, three hours, four hours and a quarter of an hour all ...
Matt's user avatar
  • 15.3k
9 votes
Accepted

Pronunciation of "Иванов"

Ивано́в is much more common although some Ivanovs prefer to be called Ива́нов. There is also the possessive adjective ива́нов (Ivan's): Ива́нов день (Kupala Night).
Sergey Slepov's user avatar
8 votes

Does anyone know of a simpler way to add accents to Cyrillic vowels than what is typically found online?

I wonder if you know of this site. It has lots of features including automatic accents:
8 votes

Does anyone know of a simpler way to add accents to Cyrillic vowels than what is typically found online?

Use this tool to have accent marks added to whole paragraphs of text automatically: http://russiangram.com Disclaimer: I created it.
8 votes

Stressed and unstressed [a]

From what I see when communicating with people learning Russian is that while pronunciation is definitely important factor it's not the most important one. Decent grammar is crucial. As of phonetics ...
shabunc's user avatar
  • 38k
7 votes
Accepted

What are the words, where stresses are important?

Such words are called омографы. They have the same written form but are pronounced differently. There's also a larger group called омонимы which have the same written form and pronunciation (коса, for ...
V.V.'s user avatar
  • 21.7k
7 votes

Russian classic literature with stress markings

I want to propose you a better solution of the problem http://morpher.ru/accentizer/ - this program makes stress marks in every Russian text. Or Google: Тексты с ударениями For example https://ru....
7 votes

Stressed and unstressed [a]

According to my experience, following common issues are disturbing while speaking Russian: Using English or French-like "r" instead of "р" (картавость); Messing "c" with "ш" (шепелявость); ...
Nadia Solovyeva's user avatar
7 votes

How does one hear the stress in Russian words?

Pre-stress is a thing in Russian, and I remember struggling with the concept of stress as a child for that exact reason. Indeed, a lot of people would pronouce спасибо with the /а/ as the loudest, ...
Nikolay Ershov's user avatar
7 votes
Accepted

Do certain prefixes attract stress?

Yes. Certain prefixes and suffixes tend to attract stress under certain conditions. As already mentioned by Quassnoi, вы- in perfective verbs is always stressed: вы́прямился, вы́качу, ...
Sergey Slepov's user avatar
6 votes

Does anyone know of a simpler way to add accents to Cyrillic vowels than what is typically found online?

The easiest way to be able to add accent marks is to install Ilya Birman's typography layout. Go there and press the big orange button "Скачать для Виндоуса" (Download for Windows). When you ...
6 votes

Pronunciation of "часа"

When we talk about one hour, in the genitive case we use ча́са. For example: "Не прошло и ча́са, как ты пришел". If we talk about several hours, in the nominative case we use часа́. For example: "Три ...
Kate Kishlaly's user avatar
6 votes

Which letters will possibly have stress marks above them?

In Russian, stresses are used only in books for foreign learners, dictionaries and academic papers, when necessary. If we're talking about Russian - and not Cyrillic in general - this kind of ...
shabunc's user avatar
  • 38k
5 votes

Why do stress patterns often match between cognates in Russian and Ukrainian?

The history of the modern Russian language is remarkable in that it appeared from convergence of two distinct dialects in about equal parts (Nothern and South-Eastern; only the latter you might call '...
Zeus's user avatar
  • 3,108
5 votes
Accepted

Why do stress patterns often match between cognates in Russian and Ukrainian?

Your claim is just wrong. While Russian and Ukrainian are very closely related indeed (so this is an answer to your question - why the majority of words that share same origin share same stress ...
shabunc's user avatar
  • 38k
5 votes

"Про Шария" - где ставить ударение?

Yes, there are plenty of Russian names and common words where the stress shifts to the ending in Accusative: Карамзи́н – Карамзина́ Зализня́к – Зализняка́ Гришкове́ц – Гришковца́ (with the fleeting ...
Sergey Slepov's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Is мне stressed?

The pronoun мне will be always pronounced as mnyeh, no matter if its stressed or not. There's no way you'd say mni. If you say it in a flowing speech (say, for example, "мне нравится этот фильм") ...
Dmitriy Purgin's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Russian prepositions & stress

Yes, that's correct; reduction applies to prepositions as if they were part of the next word, and there's even a limited number of preposition-noun combinations where the preposition steals stress: ...
Nikolay Ershov's user avatar
5 votes

Is there an unstressed ё?

There are names transcribed with unstressed ё as well. For example, the surname of mathematician Paul Erdős is spelled as Э́рдёш. Regarding трёхсот, you may put a secondary stress on the first ...
Ivan Smirnov's user avatar
5 votes

Do certain prefixes attract stress?

In perfective verbs with the prefix вы- and their derivatives (perfective participles, past adjectival participles) the stress always falls on вы-, even if does not in the imperfective counterpart: ...
Quassnoi's user avatar
  • 53.6k
4 votes
Accepted

Does anyone know of a simpler way to add accents to Cyrillic vowels than what is typically found online?

Like something on the tip of your tongue that you just can't stop thinking about, I continued to search for an answer to this. Though I never found the page that had made everything so simple, I ...
4 votes

Should the "о" in Russian be pronounced as a short "a"?

To be more precise, after a non-palatalized consonant, the pronunciation of unstressed "o" is reduced. This is called аканье (akanye) in Russian. It's quite an old phenomenon which can be ...
shabunc's user avatar
  • 38k
4 votes

Should the "о" in Russian be pronounced as a short "a"?

Yes, if unstressed. And if by "short /a/" you mean both [ʌ] and [ə]. This is a mainstream dialect which became a norm over the course of many years. Still, there may be some local dialectal ...
Matt's user avatar
  • 15.3k
4 votes

Pronunciation of "Иванов"

I would say, if you are sure Ива́нов is a surname - then it most probably not Russian one but some West-Slavic (Bulgarian?). And even more probable, that Ива́нов was not surname, it was a genitive ...
Arioch's user avatar
  • 1,305

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