5

Gemination is a bit fuzzy in Russian: Words such as касса, масса, тонна, ванна, Мекка, поддать, Приенисейе [йй] have 'true doubles': saying them with a single consonant can hinder understanding. Minimal pairs: подать - поддать, подождём - под дождём, (нет) тона - тонна, при Енисее - Приенисейе. Then there are 'false doubles' which are normally pronounced ...


4

For я in майя there's such difference, it's supposed to be pronounced like май-йа. However, for instance, de-facto this quite exotic letter combination is pronounced just like я. For verifying both of the claims you can search youtube for Майя Плисецкая (like here) and Айя-София (like here). Йе is actually pronounced just like е ([je]) - so Том Сойер would ...


4

Short answer for Russian language learners There are no simple rules to detect where Russian letter е should be read as ё (i. e. /jo/ or /ʲo/), as well as there are no rules to detect which syllable is stressed. Use dictionaries. More detailed answer for native and near-native Russian speakers Если упрощенно и вкратце, то переход /e/ → /o/, который и ...


2

Some additional examples that come to mind -- Ernest Hemmingway Hippy Happy End Hula Hoop Jimmy Hendrix Doctor House Audrey Hepburn


1

It is not quite clear what all the paragraph about what you thought on Е and Э is aimed at. If we decided to write айэ, it would sound just like ае: в мае. Unless we would like to make an extra effort to show this unusual combination in speech. It is impossible to soften й. The letters я, ю, ё, е do sound as йа, йу, йо, йэ in the alphabet, and also after ...


1

По М.А.Булгакову ("Собачье сердце"), есть и такое русское слово, как абырвалг. Из более употребительных слов можно выделить междометия ааа, ага, ай, ату и ах, а также союз а, встречаемый практически в каждом достаточно длинном тексте (включая и этот комментарий). Стоит упомянуть также прилагательное аляповатый, согласно этимологическому словарю ...


1

Letters have almost no etymological significance. When talking about etymology, you should always look at the phonetic structure of a word. Most languages have existed and developed without any alphabets for centuries. For a layman, saying that there are no native words starting with the letter A is by and large a correct and satisfactory answer. But this ...


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