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31 votes
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How come the Russian cognate for the Czech word "čerstvý" (fresh) means entirely the opposite thing (stale)?

Looking at the meanings of cognates of the Proto-Slavic čь̑rstvъ, one can notice the common meaning 'hard', 'strong', 'sharp'. I guess the Czechs and the Slovaks view fresh bread as 'hard on the ...
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23 votes
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What is the proper отчество for Cтанислау?

Станислау (Станіслаў to be precise) is a Belarusian version of name Stanislav. Keep in mind that Belarusian "ў" is more like w, so it does not sound like "oo". Let's not dive into political issues ...
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22 votes
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Can we call forms like "Зин", "Дим", "мам", "пап" vocative case?

The new vocative has nothing to do with the old vocative (whose forms would've been *Маше, *Зино and *Димо, indistinguishable by ear from the nominative but probably reflected in writing). If we are ...
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18 votes

Can we call forms like "Зин", "Дим", "мам", "пап" vocative case?

I totally agree with the answer Nikolay provided, I just want to add one other important points made by opponents of calling this new forms vocative case, here's a quote: Основное различие – с ...
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15 votes

How come the Russian cognate for the Czech word "čerstvý" (fresh) means entirely the opposite thing (stale)?

I decided to turn my comment into an answer and add some references, etc. It is a very common phenomenon in related (but, nonetheless, different !) languages. A common language splits into branches ...
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12 votes

What are the actual linguistic similarities between Russian and Belarusian?

I highly doubt that Belorussian mutually understandable with Polish. On the other hand it is quite mutually understandable with Russian, a little more so than Ukrainian. The relation is following: ...
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6 votes

How come the Russian cognate for the Czech word "čerstvý" (fresh) means entirely the opposite thing (stale)?

The original meaning of the proto-Slavic etymon seems to have been "robust, sturdy". It had later shifted its meaning to "hard" in Russian and to "good, wholesome" in Czech.
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6 votes
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Rendering of names in East Slavic languages

I think there are two distinct phenomena here. One is transliteration or re-spelling. All Slavic languages have phonetic spelling, but different reading rules. This means that to write the ...
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5 votes

Why do stress patterns often match between cognates in Russian and Ukrainian?

The history of the modern Russian language is remarkable in that it appeared from convergence of two distinct dialects in about equal parts (Nothern and South-Eastern; only the latter you might call '...
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5 votes
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Why do stress patterns often match between cognates in Russian and Ukrainian?

Your claim is just wrong. While Russian and Ukrainian are very closely related indeed (so this is an answer to your question - why the majority of words that share same origin share same stress ...
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3 votes

What are the actual linguistic similarities between Russian and Belarusian?

Belarusian is, in a sense, in between other slavic languages. Its grammar is close to that of Russian. Its vocabulary has lots of common words with all of Russian, Ukrainian, and Polish, so it's sort ...
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3 votes

How come the Russian cognate for the Czech word "čerstvý" (fresh) means entirely the opposite thing (stale)?

Иногда одно и то же слово, встречаясь в двух языках, имеет в них значение не то что «несходное», а скорее прямо противоположное. Вот пример: мы говорим «черствый» о хлебе, который уже остыл и засох; «...
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2 votes

Modern letters in Church Slavonic

are ꙗ and ѧ likewise obsolete in terms of writing Church Slavonic? No current texts I can find online (e.g. the Elizabeth Bible) avoid Я. You've probably found some sort of transcript into the modern ...
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2 votes

Modern letters in Church Slavonic

Church Slavonic orthography is quite complicated: there are different letters used to distinshuish between some homonyms, several types of stresses, commonly used abbreviations and all kind of other ...
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1 vote
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Why the distinction between animate/inanimate appears in masculine accusative but only in feminine plural?

Animacy as a syntactic feature appeared in Proto-Slavic not long before its split, and it took some time for it to spread to all semantically animate nouns (meaning nouns answering the question "...
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1 vote

Modern letters in Church Slavonic

"Appropriate" is a term that is heavily context-dependent. In linguistics text thanks to existence of Unicode (and even before it) the original Church Slavonic typeset is usually used. Exactly like ...
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  • 37.5k
1 vote

What is the proper отчество for Cтанислау?

Станислау (Stanislaw) is the Byelorussian spelling of Станислав. So, in Russian we get Станиславович/Станиславовна. Now, actually, please correct me if I’m wrong because I’m Uzbek, and really don’t ...
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1 vote

Is the Ukrainian language understandable for the average Russian native speaker?

I am a Native Russian speaker, and to me Ukrainian is like country to me. And Serbian is as American English is to Jamaican English. The words are there, but not the same. So it really depends on ...
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