8

Not at all. People use если есть all the time, and avoiding it would be as gratuitously pedantic as avoiding был бы. The connection is no longer felt, and the есть ли of your examples 4–6 is a spelling mistake despite being etymologically correct.


5

Чего here refers to the subject and the predicate of the 1st clause as a single unit (есть энтузиазм и искренняя преданность) and is a Genitive inflection form of the pronoun что because the verb недостаёт governs Genitive case (кого?/чего?). Essentially it turns the main clause into the object of the verb недостаёт in the subordinate clause. Compare the ...


5

It all depends on context; the rules are not set in stone; the "который" relative clauses in Russian are neither invariably/intrinsically non-restrictive nor invariably/intrinsically restrictive by default. I've come up with two colloquial sentences to illustrate the difference: Если и есть что-то хуже нарциссов, так это люди, которые не умеют держать ...


4

You can't see the difference between a restrictive and non-restrictive который, but you can hear it. If the noun phrase that который refers to is stressed and you can sort of "hear" the comma, i.e. the overall tone falls off and starts picking up again on который, it's non-restrictive. If it's restrictive, the noun phrase and который have about the same ...


4

Grammar I found a couple of relevant articles on RusGram.ru: Сослагательное наклонение, paragraph 4.2 Модальность, paragraph 2.4 Quoting the second one: В русском языке отчетливо противопоставлены реальное условие (с будущим временем в обеих частях условной конструкции) и контрфактивное (с сослагательным наклонением), ср. примеры (2а) и (2б) (примеры (...


2

У них есть энтузиазм и искренняя преданность своему делу, чего в целом так недостаёт всей системе. Это стандартное сложноподчиненное предложение с придаточным распространительно-присоединительным (или просто присоединительным). Такие придаточные присоединяются союзным словом ЧТО в разных формах (или наречиями почему, отчего, зачем). Союзное слово ЧТО (здесь ...


1

No, for russian speaker it hears if is or if eat dont forget to be | eat = есть so there is also lexem ambigity here, russian is so weird. P.S. Do not judge modern russian by reading old one with ѣ whatever


1

КоторЫЕ is in Nominative in the sentence #2 (subject книги) but in Accusative in the sentence #3 (the subject is этот автор while книги is the object), but in both cases it's которЫЕ since this inflexion fits both grammatical cases Nominative and Accusative which are used for subject and object in plural respectively, it refers to книги, because they're the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible