11

Слово Париж пришло в современный русский через польский, в котором оно звучит (ну, практически) так же - Paryż. Гипотеза @user31264 не выдерживает критики и проходит по разряду любительской этимологии. И например, у чехов слово Парид - Paříž - ř уж никак не объяснить "потому что так франки на самом деле произносили". Есть полуапокрифическая гипотеза, что ...


10

Most sources I could find consider Ухань (sic) a masculine word: от Уханя, к Уханю etc.: БРЭ БСЭ Географическая энциклопедия , but there are some that consider it feminine: Словарь собственных имён русского языка I should notice that Wikipedia is not an authoritative source: anyone can edit it and put any nonsense they like into the articles. At the ...


9

If you had to generalize, do Russians today hear/understand the name as "Red Square" or "Beautiful Square" (regardless of what they know intellectually about its origins)? No. In modern Russian красный does not mean красивый. For example, even if there is an idiom красна девица or красная девица, meaning beautiful girl and used mostly in fairy tails, ...


8

Согласно топонимическому словарю Е.М.Поспелова "современная французская форма названия - Пари (Paris); принятая в русском языке форма Париж усвоена в искаженном виде через польское посредство". В 58 - 51 гг. до н.э. римские войска Юлия Цезаря покорили Галлию. Попав на пять столетий под власть Рима, Лютеция Паризиорум стали называть поселение римляне. В 358 ...


8

It is derived not from noun железо but from adjective железный, so it's basically short form of "Железная Гора" - Iron Mountain. So, no mystery at all ;) There's also such city as Медногорск - "Медная гора", which name follows the same pattern. Also it worth to know that in some toponyms "-горск" comes from "гора" and in some from "город". "Железно" has ...


8

To answer your second question, in modern Russian красный (красная, красное) means red, as in color. When someone says Красная площадь, what comes to mind is the square at the center of Moscow, and neither color red nor anything else. It’s like if someone would say Sears tower, it’s the landmark building in Chicago that comes to mind, not the retail chain or ...


7

Дмитрий, школа грамматистов делится на два больших лагеря - я не про русскую а вообще. Например, французская столетиями зиждилась на том, что есть некая норма, некий правильный язык - и её надо придерживаться. Назовём этот лагерь пуристами. Другой подход - назовём его условном статистическим - отслеживается, какая из форм употребляется всё чаще, какая ...


6

Володя means Вова, which is a nickname for Владимир. Володино (село) = Vladimir's (village). This is the meaning of the name of the villages. But who exactly this Vladimir was is a mystery.


5

Is there any chance that the name given for Красная Площадь was actually intended to mean "red"? (i.e., that the story that most people believe--of the epithet for St. Basil's Cathedral carrying over to the rest of the square--is not true?) Yes and no. It took place in XVII century. And as we know, the word "Красный" got the meaning of "Red" in XVI century, ...


5

"Named" names of russian viliges originates from: family names of local landlords (помещики) ("Володино" - Володин (Volodin's), "Осипово" - Осипов (Osipоv's)). Saints names ("Анненково" - st. Ann , "Николаево" - st. Nicolas). Some arbitrary names given by landlords voluntary. A village may be named after his son, some favorite artist, ancient greek ...


5

"Novgorod by default" is Veliky Novgorod. It's an original "Novgorod". But what exactly translator ment hard to figure out. There is village of Новогородец, for example.


4

Here's a modern example (not sure if it worked at the time): http://www.kamchatka.aif.ru/society/zkh/94029 Выбираться с Камчатки на большую землю этим парням действительно не в первой.


4

Most of nouns ending with -а (-я) have feminine gender. Exceptions are: words that mean men: воевода, слуга, папа words with -ин- suffix (увеличительный субъективно-оценочный суффикс): мостина, домина words ending with -мя: * пла­мя, имя, бремя, стремя* дитя. (Source) So, when a toponym ends with -а, it is considered feminine by default. Foreign ...


4

Расея is a "lower class" equivalent of Россия (see here). Usually when someone uses this word he or she means that something that happened, or some idea, or the way the person behaves is because of "backwoods mentality" - the way people act or think in rural areas: "Эх, Расея!" as opposed to modern ways of doing things. The word form is imitating the way ...


4

Is there any chance that the name given for Красная Площадь was actually intended to mean "red"? (i.e., that the story that most people believe--of the epithet for St. Basil's Cathedral carrying over to the rest of the square--is not true?) According to the most popular version, this name was given to the square by Tsar Alexis, who has extended it from a ...


3

By intuition, whaterverово in the names of different places means "a place with a lot of whatever" of "a place that belongs to whatever". Иваново is a typical name for a village that accommodated quite a lot of people with surname Иванов (which in turn means потомок ивана, иванов сын) at the point of time when that village was given the name. Домодедово ...


3

Here is an attempt at antedating the translation "Red Square" in a variety of languages. Still work in progress. Comments and additions are welcome. English 1816: The Scots Magazine. On the 28th August, the Emperor reviewed troops in the Red Square at Moscow. German 1885: Westermann's illustrierte deutsche Monatshefte, issue 58. Von den ...


3

I think the word is derogatory and intentionally wrongly-spelled to underline the low culture of either the speaker or the country.


3

From Russian National Corpus: Шарлеруа, Гоа (Старый Гоа). Also in India: округ Кришна. Probably other Indian toponyms ending with -кришна, -рама, -раджа may be recognized in Russian as masculine. Also in Turkey: everything ending with -паша, for ex. Байрампаша, Мустафакемальпаша.


2

This is an excellent question. Actually, it is touching a very, very reach issue. The morphology of toponyms in Russian is indeed a bit complicated. Some forms originally not ending on -a (like Warsaw) have such ending in Russian. Some (like Roma), on contrary, lose original -a ending. Off the top of my head it was really hard to name any example of such ...


2

I fully agree with the explanation provided here: usually, one would expect "Володино" to provene from "Володя" or "Володин". Still, the possibility of a different origin should be explored on those special occasions when the said toponym is found at a narrow isthmus separating historical waterways. Across such places, boats were transported by dragging (in ...


1

Матёрая земля is an obsolete equivalent to материк, although the latter is attested already in the 18th century (but not in the 17th century, unlike the former): Я включаю в Камчатскую Провинцию всю сию обширность страны .. до самаго сѣверовосточнаго окончания матерыя земли. Пут. Бел. 220. На сих днях пришло в Яркут 17 перевозных судов с войском с матерой ...


1

"Железно" is the form used in forming compound nouns and adjectives. e.g, железнодорожник (n. railway worker); железнодорожный (adj. railway), as in железнодорожный вокзал (railway station). Горск means 'settlement'. Many nouns have an adjectival form with 'н'. e.g., компьютер becomes компьютерный as in комрьютерная выставка; открытие компьютерную выставку.


1

It isn't shifted. "Red" is "beautiful" (but may be "painted" or "coloured") in old Russian. Красна ягодка, красна девица, красна (not краснаЯ) площадь - red raspberry, red girl, red square - all is beautiful. Крас-ота, крас-ивый, крас-ный, крас-ка, крас-ить Update We have many different meanings for many words. I'm not a history or philology specialist,...


1

Nouns are not conjugated, they are declined. City names in Russian are declined with the exception of some foreign names, in which case the rules are quite complicated -- see http://www.gramota.ru/spravka/letters/?rub=rubric_90 (in Russian). So the correct version is "Я сейчас нахожусь в Дне". In my opinion, when in doubt whether you must decline a city ...


1

You may use phrases like "Чиновники Крымска получили...".


1

Actually there is Воевода bay in Primorye (Russian Island), http://maps.yandex.ru/-/CVbeyNiF. I think you can find lots of other examples of this kind.


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