16

Before the Russian orthography reform of 1918, the word was written as совѣтъ. The letter ѣ, though having long since merged with е in standard Russian, is pronounced as a long vowel or even as a diphtong in several Slavic languages (compare Croatian Rijeka < рѣка). It was common to transliterate ѣ as ie, and some borrowed Russian words, especially ...


15

The giveaway is the sentence before the last: Больше я в лес не ходил... и грибы не трогал It hints that the person describing this nonsense has eaten some mushrooms in the woods and got hallucinated a bit.


14

The salutation Ура! Ура! Ура! repeated three times (троекратное ура) is a usual greeting in the army used during parades, official meetings and performed by a chorus of military men. While being spoken the reverberation of voices makes it as if several sounds of р-р were pronounced. The interjection corresponds to the English "Hooray! (Hurrah)" expressing ...


14

Strictly speaking, it's "Серафима", with "м". Obviously the concept of translation is pretty vague when it comes to names, after all, Peter is not Пётр. However everyone who is named Seraphina in Italian, Spanish or Latin usually (but not always! - see below) is called "Серафима" in Russian. Why in some languages this name is with "n" and in some with "m" ...


12

People who tend to use 'Latin' pronunciation in abbreviations (and it is a very common practice) would say "ye te tse". Just like they say "ye dva ye chetyre" (E2-E4) to describe one of the favorite first moves in the Chess. Not ""e dva e chetyre".


10

Yep, as already is told in comments, "т" is usually standing for t[θ] in modern Russian (though we have Фёдор vs. Theodor, Коринф vs. Corinth). But behold, here I present you a universal algorithm for resolving issues of this kind: Choose one celebrity with this name. In our case, let's go with Keith Richards. Find an article about this person in English ...


10

Usually the apostrophe in personal names retains, so we have in translation Юджин О'Нил, Шакил О'Нил and actually a lot of other О'Нилs. The same about Жанна Д'Арк (or д'Арк) or Габриеле Д’Аннунцио (or д’Аннунцио) etc. This is what you'll see in newspapers and books. In official documents it could be more tricky though. I won't be surprised that there are ...


9

You are right, that the current style of romanization of Russian surnames is "-ov" (transliteration), while in the past it used to be "-off" (quasi-phonetic). See this paper in French (with English abstract) on the subject. Note, that until recently when Russians were issued travel documents, their names were romanized in French style, i.e. "-ow" would have ...


9

The text is complete nonsense, it can serve as a good example of schizophasia. Obviously the text is intended to sound funny.


9

Alright! Everything's gonna be alright! (Bob Marley)


9

Сorrect Russian spelling of the last name of the US President-elect, Donald Trump - Трамп.


9

I have never heard from a single IT person to call it "e te tse". You can of course use both options. But all my IT colleagues call it "ye te tse", since the first letter in /etc E is mostly similar to Russian E (pronounced "ye").


9

Wikipedia indeed mentions that this corresponds to practical Dutch transliteration, as you can clearly see from exactly the article linked. A Dutch "v" is usually transliterated as "в", we say "ван Дамм" and "Велдховен", not "фан Дамм" and "Фелдховен". However - and that fact might seem quite ...


8

From a reference book by Rozenthal, much trusted author: http://www.evartist.narod.ru/text1/24.htm §17. Географические и административно-территориальные названия 4.Части сложных географических названий пишутся с прописной буквы, причем соединяются дефисом, если они образованы: д) сочетанием иноязычных элементов, например: Алма-Ата («отец яблок»), Норд-Кап ...


8

What you are searching for is translit: Translit is a method of encoding Cyrillic letters with Latin ones. [...] The translit system arose when Russian speakers first needed to write their language on computers that did not support the Cyrillic script. Basically what it means is that you will write russian words using the latin keyboard. There are ...


7

The printed phrase is "Хорошо! Всё будет хорошо!". It means "Okay! It will be okay!". Probably, this phrase is a quotation from lyrics of the famous Ukrainian songer Andrey Danilko. He has an eponymous song.


7

Я бы сказал, что при переводе текст вообще "разбухает", неважно, переводят ли с русского на английский, или же наоборот. И дело тут не в длине отдельных слов (английские слова в среднем действительно несколько короче, а если учитывать только слоги - поэтический перевод - то и намного короче), что на самом деле компенсируется наличием артиклей и избытком ...


7

Though correct transliteration of lyp-sync is липсинК, липсинГ is often used instead, because the word is not listed in dictionaries, and as such, Russian speakers use their language feeling to decide which writing form suites best in this case. Note that most Russian speakers do not know English, so they do not use English rules here. So, from a ...


6

я никогда не знаю что говорить в такие моменты


6

I think there are two distinct phenomena here. One is transliteration or re-spelling. All Slavic languages have phonetic spelling, but different reading rules. This means that to write the pronunciation of certain word they have to re-spell them in their own rules. This happens not only with names but with any borrowed words. Slavic languages do not tolerate ...


6

When I studied at the university, here, in Ukraine, in the late 90s, our professor of English and American literature was outraged by that spelling, and even in our examination cards in his subject he spelled "Bernard Shaw" as "Бернард Шо". Moreover, he also spelled "Edgar Poe" as "Эдгар Поу", although the standard Russian rendering of that name is "Эдгар По"...


6

Я присутствовала на лекции С. Л. Николаева (доктор филологических наук, Институт славяноведения РАН), где после лекции был задан этот вопрос. Доктор Николаев ответил, что такой зависимости он не отметил. Перевод обычно длиннее оригинала, так как понятие, передаваемое одним словом в языке А, нередко переводится двумя словами в языке Б, чтобы избавиться от ...


6

Let me quote my own answer to a related question, Difference in pronunciation between “щ” and “шь”?: As for щ, it is a long alveopalatal consonant, IPA symbol for it is /ɕː/ (you can listen to the sound there, and there is also the sound for the Russian word 'счастье' [ˈɕːæsʲtʲjə] in which 'сч' is pronounced as 'щ'). Roughly speaking, in Standard Russian ...


6

Short answer: normally transliterated Russian names cannot start with C. Long answer: sometimes the name bearer can change that. There is a law (Приложение N 6 к Приказу ФМС от 26.03.2014 N 211) that explicitly states how Cyrillic names should be transliterated in Russian-issued foreign passports. However, it also states that applicant may have their name ...


5

It is not "Кир, сир.", but "Кит, сир." "Что" is "what", not "where" as you have it. The whole dialog is like that: — Что там, Бертран? (What [is] there, Bertran?) — Кит, сир. ([A] whale, sire.) Russian omits the present forms of the verb "to be" (am, is, are), and has no articles, you have to insert them yourself when you translate from Russian into ...


5

Sergei Rachmaninov (Rachmaninoff) emigrated from Russia to the United States after the Communist revolution of 1917. He used Latin script to spell his name as "Sergei Rachmaninoff". For example, the following books about him were published in NY: Rachmaninoff’s recollections told by Oscar von Riesemann, L. — N. Y., 1934 Bertensson S. and Leyda J., ...


5

In this article "базовая линия" is a line between squares, it could be translated as "grid line" or "dividing line". The word "профиль" is used in a sense like "topographic profile", a cross-sectional view of the matrix. So, it says that the cross section in the 1st grid line can only be an empty bitmap. The final result will be in a[m+1, 0]. One can make ...


5

The English name Billy for instance is traditionally transliterated in Cyrillic as Билли and i feel would almost stop being immediately recognizable as itself and would look odd had it been transliterated as Били. However this method of transliteration accords with rules of the Practical transcription of English into Russian specifically this one ll - [...


5

In Russian, double letters typically transliterated as double, regardless of original pronunciation. Note that in Russian double letters do not always need to sound as double either (ex. "параллельный"). Also, a foreign name with double letters often looks like a legal name, while compressing it to a single makes it look like a nickname ("Harry" - "Гарри" ...


5

Если это пиньинь, а похоже на то, тогда Цзянь Ян, если это фамилия и имя, или Цзяньян, если это имя Подкрепляя цитатой из таблицы перевода пиньиня в систему Палладия jian — цзянь yang — ян


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