Hot answers tagged

47

You have a very good teacher, Mitsuko, and I'm sure one day you will appreciate what he's doing for you. :) The dialogue seems to be grossly ungrammatical and to make little sense It makes perfect sense to a native speaker. The woman asks whether they shall cross the road (or not). The man points out that they can't cross now because the light is red. She ...


44

The source of that meaning comes from a rather old slang verb динáмить meaning водить за нос; продолжительное время обманывать, вводить в заблуждение, не делать по отношению к кому-либо обещанного или ожидаемого; прогуливать, пропускать что-либо (уроки, занятия, встречи и т. д.); флиртовать, не вступая в интимную связь (обычно о женском поле). The ...


39

I suppose that your translation ‘a bout of hysteria’ is more about physiological process, which is uncontrollable. But the verb ‘закатить’ assumes a girl’s intention. So maybe ‘throw a tantrum’ would be better in this context.


35

There are a few different meanings in your examples. Let's try and unpick them. У меня, у нас can be used to express: Possession: у меня = мой, у нас = наш: У меня рука болит = Моя рука болит. У нас народ умный = Наш народ умный (your example #4) A patronizing / possessive way of referring to people, often your kids / spouses, etc. Он у меня ещё ...


35

It seems she said я та ещё щука. Тот ещё means "quite, some, hell of", as in "That's some vacation you spent with me", "That's quite a wife you have", etc: Скорее я могу быть генералом де Голлем, чем он ― секретарем райкома. Между прочим, он тот еще трус Твой Стрельников тот еще жук, и сам денег нагреб, и нам еще осталось. ...


33

Original meaning of еба́ть is to fuck. This root comes from Proto-Indo-European language where it had the same meaning (o̯i̯ebhoa̯ “I fuck”). The root later acquired some developments into the meaning “to beat”, (въеба́ть, вы́ебать, means to beat somebody), possibly either because it is common to beat somebody into the reproductive organs or because fuck is ...


33

In Russian, член is only male, and adjectives referring to that noun should agree with it in masculine, too: Великобритания — постоянный член Совета Безопасности ООН. or Великобритания — член ООН. Также она постоянный член Совета Безопасности ООН. For your purpose, the best way out is to add the word "женщина", that is use a noun, not an adjective ("...


32

First of all, a shameless plug of my earlier answer on why у does not quite mean "near" (but something more akin to the French chez, i.e. a place/household/domain notion used in the abstract.) Secondly, I have a general impression that languages usually start out not having a verb for "to have", and then some evolve it and some don't. Entire language ...


32

The closest match I can think of is "тревожный звонок" / "тревожный звоночек" (more popular form), like in: Если твой парень никогда не приводит тебя в свой дом - это тревожный звонок. Here a some other (real-life) examples: «Авангард» завершил регулярку четырьмя поражениями и упустил второе место на Востоке, это тревожный звоночек. (&...


29

I'm native russian speaker. If you had video/audio call, then you most likely misheard her. It is not "Так что я тающая щука" It is "Так что я та ещё сука". It's not an idiom it's more like just an emotional expression, which can be translated like: "Well, I am a bitch" or "Well, I am bitchy" In regular context it ...


27

It's political. В Украине is the officially preferred Ukrainian version, на Украине is the one that Russia sticks to, and the fur has been flying for decades at this point. In fact the reason you got downvoted was probably that someone thought you were flamebaiting.


24

There is a Russian word хлеба́ло wich is a vulgar way to say “mouth”. It is derived from the verb хлеба́ть, “to eat liquid food with a spoon; to drink”, this verb is colloquial and stylistically neutral. Xлеба́ло is formed by the non-productive suffix -л- which is used to form the names of instruments: сиде́ть (to sit) — седло́ (saddle) дыша́ть (to ...


23

Most probably, the name is Seryozha (Серёжа), which is the diminutive of Sergey (Сергей).


23

Just homonyms.There's an older word, подкол 'joke' together with the verbs подколоть (perf.), подкалывать (imp.) 'to play a joke [on smb]', but here 'the joke' is aimed at a person to make laugh of them. Прикол is almost the same, only another prefix is kind of showing that the joke is neutral, that is not aimed at/against somebody. That is a mere ...


21

This is not indecent word. This is indecent theme (topic). Therefore the speaker made an excuse.


21

хорошо для тебя in this context is not idiomatic. I guess in Russian it can be expressed with Поздравляю! or Молодец/Молодчина! (Тебе) везёт / Везёт (тебе) is suitable in situations where luck is truly a determinant or when there's some degree of jealousy involved. In the context of physical benefit it's usually phrased as полезно, and тебе полезно when ...


20

There are two options: first - patronymic - surname surname - first - patronymic Examples: Иван Иванович Иванов Иванов Иван Иванович In other words patronymic is an "extension" for the first name and can only follow it. Except a very informal form, when only the patronymic is used. For example: Эй, Петрович! The full name is the most formal ...


20

You use perfective verbs when you are talking about a task that you have to complete once: Мне надо помыть четырёх кошек (и потом я могу отдыхать). And you use imperfective verbs when you are talking about tasks that you do on a regular basis: Мне надо мыть четырёх кошек (каждую неделю). Or, for your example: Перед едой (каждый раз) надо мыть руки....


19

Аж is indeed etymologically connected to даже, however has nuances in usage. When used with measurable quantities it means "no less than", "as many as", "whole" etc., mostly ironically: Бильярдов теперь на этом вокзале аж три. // Now, there are no less than three pool tables on this station. Живут же раки, говорят, аж до ...


19

For a person (and in Russian everything is a person), the Russian thought model makes no distinction between: the person's moral right to do something; the person's ability to do something (like, physical ability); the objective circumstances allowing or not for anyone to do something in a given situation. (Note that the circumstances are a person too!) ...


18

In the modern Russian vernacular, “по ходу” is used instead of “похоже” to mean “probably”. That's a new phenomenon, and I think that's ugly, too. “Похоже” is substituted by “по ходу” mostly by students, both in high schools and in higher education. ========================= В современном разговорном русском "по ходу" используется вместо "похоже" в ...


18

Кнопка активируется, когда заполнены все поля. Активировать means to turn on,to make active what didn't work,to start a process. activate. Активизировать means to make a process more active, to increase productivity or speed.


18

First of all, I agree with Nikolay Ershov and others who point out that your understanding of "у" is incorrect: it really mostly means belonging (even stronger than chez) and only secondarily and colloquially you can use it to talk about proximity. Russian absolutely has a verb for ownership, the same "иметь" you mention, but: it must be used logically, in ...


18

Не наебёшь — не проживёшь This literally means "if you don't fuck people over, you don't survive". The meaning of this proverb is slightly different from the Chinese one, as it's more about moral justification of cheating rather than pure utility, but otherwise I think it's a good analog. Elaborating on some suggestions from the comments: Не пойман — ...


18

To eliminate the awkwardness of such double negations a safer approach is to (steer away from English patterns and) use сложноподчиненное предложение, e.g.: Нет ничего, о чём я побоялась бы написать. and similar constructs.


18

Please don't. Many feminitives sound like mockery (директорша, врачиха), unless they are well-established (учительница, официантка, вахтёрша). Even when fairly acceptable feminine versions exist, sometimes masculine are still preferred: женщина-повар (over повариха), поэт (over поэтесса), писатель (over писательница). The word поэтесса was despised by Anna ...


17

These sentences: Я имею леопарда Я имею самокат are comprehensible but barely grammatical in modern Russian, unless you want to say that you're engaging in an intimate encounter with the leopard or the scooter. In the modern dialect those would be the primary meanings. Иметь is used in positions which grammatically require a verb and cannot be easily ...


17

Russian does have an imperfective verb meaning "to be" (быть) and it even can be conjugated: я есмь ты еси он, она, оно есть мы есмы вы есьте они суть , though in modern language personal forms (except for the 3rd sg., and, more rarely, 3rd pl.) are only used in grand style rhetoric (which in Russian heavily utilizes Church Slavonic constructs). ...


17

Объединять and its derivatives were not used in Russian before about 1850. Kostomarov did use it time to time in his works, however, he mostly used соединить wherever a modern Russian speaker would have used объединить: Итак, вместо того чтобы идти соединенными силами на половцев, Владимиру приходилось идти войною на своих. Рязанские и муромские князья уже ...


17

Sarcastic version of «Good for you» is «флаг тебе в руки». Example: - Если тебя все устраивает, то флаг тебе в руки. Но я увольняюсь. - Good for you if you're ok with that. But I'm quitting the job


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