alexsms
  • Member for 3 years, 11 months
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"Готовил" vs "приготовил" usage in emphasising time
2 votes

This use implies the process of cooking, i.e. he was physically doing something (cooking, cutting, washing, waiting, checking) for 3 hours. But one can say Повар приготовил обед за 3 часа. - This is ...

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Why do Russians say that all men are billy goats (все мужики козлы)?
3 votes

The important part of your question mentions intergender relationships. So you are right that much depends on culture and degree of rudeness, acceptance of rude emotions (or just emotions). So such ...

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The adjective "экономичный" to modify animate objects
-1 votes

If you mean frugal (person) or that a dog doesn't require a lot of money to keep, 'экономичный' makes no sense. Экономичный implies equipment, method of production, etc. which saves energy, time and ...

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"клеветa в отношении чего-то" vs. "клеветa о чём-то"
2 votes

The first sounds OK I guess, since it implies that a whole country (China) is falsely accused of something, so the formal language (в отношении) is expected. The second sounds slightly incorrect and ...

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What is the Russian equivalent of 干物女 (dried fish woman)?
0 votes

In some cases a description might suit: e.g. она ленивая и не заботится о себе (не ухаживает за собой)

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"Крутой" and "жёсткий" as personality traits: Meanings and difference
Accepted answer
1 votes

I think your comment "My Impression is that жёсткий is rather about having a backbone..." is very close. Жёсткий - hard, not willing to compromise, not listening to others' concerns, not caring what ...

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Expressing surprise (multiple variations of "I am lost for words")
3 votes

It fits best in neutral style, so you are right here. It has nothing to do with medical ability. It's a literary (poetic) alternative for No.1. Notice that дар - gift - implies it's a metaphor. ...

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Words for "mow the lawn", "cut the grass"
2 votes

Стричь траву is a very common expression for private households (which have become quite common even in urban areas as @tum_ mentioned). I think it's often траву, because газон is associated with ...

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In saying "watch the aurora", how are "наблюдать за" and "наблюдать" nuanced?
0 votes

According to Толковый словарь Кузнецова (наблюдать): 4th sense (осуществлять надзор, наблюдение ЗА) .. за детьми, за порядком. In this sense it's always with ЗА. But it's not your case. 1st sense (...

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Word for "activity tracker" or "smart bracelet"
1 votes

It may look strange but some people prefer to just use the word БРАСЛЕТ or ЧАСЫ for this kind of device. From the context it's usually clear what they mean. In casual talks they tend not to use ...

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Is there such an expression as "удача века"?
0 votes

It's strange that they (or maybe it was a translation by a robot) use Удача = luck, success, lucky chance, and Век = century, era, period of time. Glorious opportunity! - Прекрасная возможность, ...

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"Oбнулить" и "настраивать на нуль"
0 votes

Обнулить предполагает, что есть какое-то значение, которое делается равным нулю. Т.е. некое значение существует до операции ОБНУЛЕНИЯ. Настроить на ноль - может быть и до существования значения, до ...

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Flee: "бежать" or "сбежать"?
Accepted answer
3 votes

Generally speaking they are both stylistically neutral and can be used to describe 'fleeing', 'escape from prison/other institution/country'. But бежать is described as спасаться бегством, while ...

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Can you use the word "муть" in a conversation, or is it a profane word?
1 votes

Despite the OP's vote for the best answer, and having in mind that this word is not as simple as some of the answers and comments imply, and in the spirit of stackexchange to provide CITED sources, I ...

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Why is the imperfective used in Questions with—Что, Где, Когда, etc
Accepted answer
3 votes

It's natural to shift tenses or aspects in casual speech. Compare with English: - You will go to Canada to deal with this. - OK. When am I going? It seems that (at least in your examples) if a ...

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What does "куда мне звонить" mean?
4 votes

The meaning is similar to 'Where am I to call' and it's expressed by the infinitive. A simpler phrase "куда звонить?" is also valid (cf, Where should one call?). The idea is that the infinitive can ...

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difference between "расскажите мне" and "скажите мне"
Accepted answer
5 votes

Расскажите - implies a story, some description. Скажите - just say, tell. Example: Скажи ему, что ты его любишь = Tell him that you love him. Расскажи ему, КАК ты его любишь (in the sense '...

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Adjective gender for terms of endearment
1 votes

The answer to your question is NO. The describing word must correspond grammatically to the word you describe. These are grammatical relations and male/female problem is not really important here.

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Can переспать be used to mean "oversleep"?
3 votes

In my opinion, the first step is to consult the usual dictionary of Russian. It's strange that the native speakers of Russian rarely do it in this stackexchange community. I believe it's the spirit of ...

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The meaning of "отводная стрельня"
Accepted answer
0 votes

It's possbible to find the word стрельница in dictionaries. It must be the same as стрельня. Such ARCHAIC words may have different variants, because they had been used by people quite before ...

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"Апартаменты" or "квартира"
2 votes

Квартира is the word to be used in most cases. Аппартаменты (usually PLURAL) as slightly archaic is used to denote reception rooms in palaces, luxury suites, etc. So it's usually not used for modern ...

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What is the grammatical rationale for using the imperfective "рассыпа́ться" or the perfective "рассы́паться"?
0 votes

I think you could hold in mind the formula: Ни к чему ДЕЛАТЬ это. Always imperfective. Hence рассыпАться.

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Usage of "рваться"
0 votes

It's used with both prepositions and adverbs. Quite often with prepositions in sports, fighting, warfare, competition contexts. Cf, рвётся в бой (in a fight), рвётся к воротам (in football) - ...

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"Худой" or "плохой"
1 votes

Плохой is neutral word for 'bad'. Худой is neutral word for 'skinny, thin' (of a person). But худой can be used in the sense 'bad', according to the dictionary (where it's marked as традиционно-...

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Difference of usage between ‘право, правда, and действительно’?
1 votes

If you want a short answer and the question means these 3 words in the sense REALLY, here is the answer: действительно - neutral, правда - colloquial, право - very old-fashioned, hence could be ...

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Russian equivalents of the colloquial "What's the hold-up?"
1 votes

Since 'hold-up' is quite neutral (meaning 'delay') it seems to me you need more or less neutral register here. My guess is "Что так долго? Почему так долго?", preferably said so that to sound neutral, ...

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Choosing between "за" + instr. noun and imperfective verbal adverbs
Accepted answer
3 votes

Participles are a more flexible way, they work oftener, I guess a lot depends on style (за + inst. looks more literary), and these two ways are NOT interchangable, sometimes only one of the two is ...

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Nuances of meaning between "Если бы", "Вот бы", and "Вот если бы"
1 votes

Если бы и в жизни было так. - expresses observation on a condtion which in real life is usually not true (e.g. something happens in a movie, you know it's not possible in real life, hence this comment ...

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Difference in meaning between "слышать, как ..." and "слышать, что ..."
3 votes

Using как seems more dynamic to me.. I heard how she thanked me.. (I was hearing her, may be physically, very likely I heard it myself). Using что is more about stating the fact, it could be I heard ...

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Russian equivalents of "I could've sworn ..."
0 votes

OALD explains 'I could have sworn' like this: [transitive] to promise that you are telling the truth swear (that)… She swore (that) she’d never seen him before. I could have sworn (= I am sure) I ...

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