Manjusri
  • Member for 9 years
  • Last seen more than 2 years ago
1 answers
2 votes
112 views
One Crayz but nice to underestand on KitKat Choclate?
Accepted answer
1 votes

The answer is simple; на порцию 23,5 г = per portion of 23,5 g / por cada ración de 23,5 g; ккал = kcal (a unit of energetical value of food). Trivia: in Ukranian (another East-Slavic language) the ...

View answer
2 answers
2 votes
185 views
Why do not use prepositional case to indicate position in the following sentence
1 votes

The phrase Часто днём бегу в спортзал или в бассейн means a transition (translative) state emphasising the direction whereto a speaker is headed. The phrase Часто днём бегу (better: бегаю) в ...

View answer
3 answers
5 votes
312 views
What is "у меня" in "после русского языка у меня будет химия" why not " после русского языка я буду в лекцию химия"?
Accepted answer
1 votes

Russian prepositions can express either motion/tramsition, or state (both evidential and non-evidential). The stumbling block is usually how to distinguish between a motion (or transition) and a ...

View answer
2 answers
7 votes
743 views
Why is "счастливый" in instrumental case in the following sentence?
1 votes

In terms of Aktionsart, there are two sub-aspects rendered by means of Russian Instrumental Case. The first one (that is, the Essive) is indeed similar to Essive in most Uralic languages (whenever a ...

View answer
4 answers
4 votes
211 views
Genitive Case Word Order "У них ничего нет" vs. "У них нет ничего"
1 votes

The meaning is often conveyed by the intonation, yet some general rules can be detected. E.g. in Russian syntax (just like in Finnish and Estonian) the topic-commentary strategy gives additional ...

View answer
2 answers
2 votes
147 views
Кто-то в очках?
1 votes

One has ... (У кого-то [есть] ...) requires a nominative (not accusative). в очках here requires some more words. This wouldn't make the phrase more canonical, but at least it would not be so strange ...

View answer
5 answers
4 votes
522 views
why друг is in genitive case in this sentence?
1 votes

The number of cases in modern Russian is disputable (some researchers say that there are over 20 of them), but the thing is that a meaning of Genitive is not unified. Hence, when you use it in ...

View answer
2 answers
7 votes
420 views
The origin of complex plural forms
1 votes

Interesting enough, in Russian you use sg. gen. when counting up to four items, and pl.gen. when counting from five and more items. For example: два (четыре/три) цветка / пять цветков две (четыре/...

View answer
9 answers
14 votes
8k views
Pronunciation of 'ы'
1 votes

The three sounds are different. ы sounds more like back vocal compared to i in city, milk, or think. One of the close cognates of the ы sound is Polish y. The sound is pronounced with a tip of tongue ...

View answer
3 answers
6 votes
563 views
Are there verbs in -оть not having been subject to the metathesis of the liquids?
1 votes

Actually, none of the CS or PS verbs could have -оть in its endings, because -оть is a MR ending. By the way, you have missed the dialect form of надоть.

View answer
2 answers
7 votes
370 views
Proper use of ничто when answering
1 votes

You may use it as a closed response to an answer suggesting broader reply whenever a) you wish to emphasise that you do not wish to continue a conversation and b) the question has been asked with a ...

View answer
3 answers
9 votes
1k views
Answering negative questions with one word (да/нет) - are there rules?
1 votes

Russian is like Irish or Finnish in this respect; the former has no specific word for 'yes'/'no', the latter has some specific words for 'yes' and several varieties for 'no' govered by grammatical ...

View answer
11 answers
25 votes
7k views
Usage patterns of "надо" vs. "нужно"
1 votes

надо means 'I have a need and it is not mine/it is for someone else's benefit, for I don't feel it myself' нужно means roughly 'I have a need and it is mine/I want to satisfy it to my personal ...

View answer
14 answers
57 votes
40k views
What does the phrase "Да нет" mean?
1 votes

It means 'yes, but --', or 'actually no/not', or 'I can see your point and accept it, but the real things differ entirely from what you said'. Like in any conversational strategy, the meaning is ...

View answer
5 answers
7 votes
437 views
How to say "crank"?
1 votes

You might also say дилетант to emphasise on someone's lack of scientific knowledge and non-professionalism, although I would prefer harsher words from another semantic field.

View answer
2 answers
19 votes
963 views
Does “official Russian” language exist?
1 votes

Both 'yes' and 'no'. 'Yes', because the mixture of Russian Empire канцелярит with calques from French and, especially, German has prevailed throughout the Soviet times, entering the legal and ...

View answer
4 answers
7 votes
688 views
What is the difference between “вчера” and “день назад”?
1 votes

There are two differences: a) time reference point and b) productivity. As a time reference point, вчера, позавчера (the day before tomorrow) and even such grammatical, although not too frequently, ...

View answer
2 answers
3 votes
89 views
Translating linguistic terminology into Russian
0 votes

Since 'annotation' refers to 'a pragmatic meaning in spoken text', and since '' is usually used in Russian academic language as a term for 'summary', I believe the terms 'прагматическая атрибуция' or '...

View answer
2 answers
4 votes
170 views
How does "суметь + infinitive" differ in usage from "смочь + infinitive"?
0 votes

In my opinion, the primary difference is not about 'resiliance VS general ability' but rather between суметь as 'repeating actions' (iterative) VS смочь as momentary action. Most of Russian prefixes ...

View answer
6 answers
4 votes
3k views
How to say "fuckers" in Russian
0 votes

Considering the context of your presumably fantastic novel, where the character is addressing an alien life form, I guess the best option would be пидорасы (lit. homos, or faggots). But since you are ...

View answer
5 answers
1 votes
624 views
Translation of "to be confronted with"
0 votes

I think we could deal just with adverbs or quasiadverbal structures combined with Ho in beginning of a phrase, e. g.: Но я сказал ему, что, напротив / на самом деле /фактически / видел, как он ...

View answer
3 answers
2 votes
343 views
When to use "у" or "к"?
0 votes

The choice depends on semantics and semantics are to be defined by a case + preposition. Hence, when we speak about a non-motional state, we usew y (= près de, au côté de; proche de; chez; voisinant) ...

View answer
3 answers
1 votes
796 views
"Какая модель это?" or "Какой модель это"?
0 votes

In fact, you can be sure only about grammatical gender of abstract nouns derived from adjectives and ending in -сть; they are 99,999% feminine. The grammatical genders of other words ending in the ...

View answer
4 answers
4 votes
568 views
What is the use of "Ha" in these two sentences?
0 votes

Both на and в can be used to describe a motion, but the former is similar to Balto-Fennic Allative (evident motion and/or destination), while the latter is more like Illative case. The meaning of на +...

View answer
2 answers
7 votes
220 views
"Про Шария" - где ставить ударение?
0 votes

Yes, a personal name often retains its initial stress position. A stress position depends largely on a 'country of origin' of a personal name. The rule works also with loan words, e.g. a lot of ...

View answer
3 answers
3 votes
348 views
Accusative vs Instrumental case
0 votes

In short, Accusative goes for a direct object (e.g. an object without a preposition, AKA the object itself), and Instrumental goes for an indirect object (that is, an [non-living] object with a ...

View answer
3 answers
4 votes
354 views
"Я учу игре на гитаре" - why "игре"?
0 votes

The logic of choice between verb compliment VS noun compliment is two-fold. First, a choice between a noun and a verb (in a language where such a choice is possible) depends on a speaker's modal ...

View answer
6 answers
9 votes
638 views
Is there a difference between "болен" and "заболел"?
0 votes

Grammatically, болен is a noun on a bordeline between a Participle and an Adjective (from больной / болеть and in this sense it is close to verbal nouns in English) and заболел is a perfective verb (...

View answer
2 answers
2 votes
142 views
Как можно перевести "imageware" на русский?
0 votes

Выбирайте: видеометрика визуальное ПО система распознавания образов система визуального распознавания визуальное оснащение образ-система имидж-оборудование образ-оборудование система образов ...

View answer
9 answers
12 votes
716 views
"Деревья свалил ветер" vs "Деревья свалило ветром"
0 votes

Apart from being neutral and/or emphasising the subconsciopus perception, the words with neutrum verbs (another type of quasi-ergative structure in Russian) work as sentences with dummy pronouns in ...

View answer