Quassnoi
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"Take turns" in Russian
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13 votes

It's по очереди. Jim and Bob are taking turns playing with their mom's Xbox // Джим и Боб играют в мамин Xbox по очереди.

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Appropriate term for 'grandparents'?
13 votes

Russian does not have a collective word from "grandparents" indeed. If you are speaking about grandparents' achievements, synecdoches like деды or отцы и деды could be used: страну построили отцы и ...

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Homographs that differ only with respect to a stress
13 votes

во́роны - "ravens" воро́ны - "crows" вороны́ - "black" (эти кони саврасы, а те - вороны́)

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Difference between "тоже" and "также". Where to place "тоже"?
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13 votes

Тоже and также very roughly correspond to English "too" and "as well". Тоже is a thematic (topical) adverb, также is rhematic (commentary). Тоже means that the comment on the topic ...

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Russian equivalent of expression "you know"
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13 votes

Those expressions are called "fillers". Russian, as most languages, has many of them: как бы, типа, знаешь, так сказать etc: They usually don't need to be translated verbatim: Постарайся вести ...

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Is it true that the spelling reform changed the meaning of 'War and Peace'?
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13 votes

No, it's not true. Russian has two homonymous words (both pronounced мир) for world and peace. Currently, they are homographes as well, but in the old orthography they were written мiръ and миръ, ...

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What is the difference between "в ходе" and "во время" if both can be used to mean "during"?
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12 votes

В ходе means "during the course", literally "during the onward movement" (in either language). I believe this expression is a calque from French, both in English and in Russian. ...

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What's the relation between у.е. to USD?
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12 votes

У. е. means условная единица, "conventional unit". States with significant Russian speaking population (Russia, Belarus, Ukraine, other former USSR republics) were experiencing high level of ...

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Meaning of word егоза
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12 votes

Егоза is a brand of coiled barbed tape used by the Russian military. Its original meaning is "fidgety person" indeed.

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Почему "Венера", а не 'Венус"?
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12 votes

Imparisyllabic Latin words (meaning words having an extra syllable in genitive compared to nominative) are usually cited in their genitive form, as it's usually a more accurate representation of the ...

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"Одену" or "надену"
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12 votes

Надевать / надеть что-то (на кого-то) means "to put something on (someone)". Одевать / одеть кого-то (во что-то) means "to dress someone (in something)". The direct object (one without a preposition)...

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Russianization of Ancient Greek personal names
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12 votes

This tradition comes way back from Old Church Slavonic. OCS was conceived as a literary language for translation of the Scripture. As such, though it was based on the Slavic dialect spoken in ...

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Why are there letters which look similar but are pronounced differently between the English alphabet and Russian Cyrillic?
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12 votes

Cyrillic alphabet was developed in what is modern Bulgaria based on Greek alphabet, so: В was modeled after Greek Β (beta). This was originally pronounced [b] in ancient Greek but in modern (and ...

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Как правильно: змееед или змееяд?
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12 votes

The bird of prey is definitely called змееяд or орёл-змееяд in Russian. I've never seen it called змееед, and it's not mentioned in the dictionaries. It uses the OCS rendition of the second root, ...

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фашист, бандит and their real equivalent meaning in Russian?
12 votes

Фашист in colloquial Russian means primarily a German Nazi (or, through metonimy, any supporter of Nazi or Nazi-like ideology). The term was widely used by the Soviet media in 1930's, and the German ...

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"Пока чайник закипит" or "пока чайник не закипит"
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12 votes

These are different conjunctions. Rosenthal et al., Справочник по правописанию, произношению и литературному редактированию, §209.2: Различается употребление в придаточных предложениях времени ...

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How to say "Kafkaesque" in Russian?
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12 votes

The corpus knows the noun кафкианство: Экая гоголиана, устало думал Миша Белосельско-Белозерский, экое утомительное кафкианство, экая мамлеевщина, экий сорокинизм! [Василий Аксенов. Негатив ...

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Do "русый" and "русский" have a common root?
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12 votes

Русый originates from the Slavic word *рудсъ (red) and is directly related to words like рыжий, рдеть, рожа (disease) etc, and also to the words orginated from the same PIE root, including English red ...

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What is the origin of "на обиженных воду возят"?
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12 votes

First of all, it's usually very hard to find a "real origin" for a common saying (unless it was coined by someone in writing). The common sayings constantly develop, change their meaining, get ...

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Is it considered proper to use вы with older people, even when they address you with ты?
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12 votes

If you're not acquainted with an adult person (for a male person of your age that would be males in their 30's or above and females in their 20's or above), it's socially inacceptable to address them ...

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What's the difference between -либо and -нибудь?
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12 votes

Words with "-нибудь" might have a secondary connotation: "of any quality, no matter how bad", which words with "-либо" would lack: Артист без критика как-нибудь проживёт, а критик без артиста? [...

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Russian translation for "I'm looking for a long-term relationship"
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11 votes

Я ищу долгосрочных отношений Отношения (in the sense of "romantic relationship") is plural in Russian, it's idiomatic. In the singular, отношение means "relation" in the context ...

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Easiest way to understand воинская часть for the modern Russian military
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11 votes

There are two related yet distinct terms: воинская часть and войсковая часть. Воинская часть is primarily a management entity, similar to a branch in civilian corporations. It has its own bank account,...

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Is во времена, instead of во время, used only when it refers to people?
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11 votes

Во время means "during something": Во время войны (= "during the war") Россия жила по сухому закону. [Даниил Гранин. Зубр (1987)] Впервые эта служба была совершена всенародно во ...

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Why is the Russian word Лошадь (horse) so similar to the word площадь (square)?
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11 votes

They are not related any more than English "mare" and "square" are. Лошадь is believed to originate from Turkic languages. Площадь is a native Russian word, ultimately from a Proto-...

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Difference in pronunciation of е and ѣ in old Russian
11 votes

In Russian, е and ѣ completely lost their difference about the end of XVIII, long before sound recording was invented. PIE contrasted long and short vowels. ѣ originated from the PIE's long vowel ē ...

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Почему Йорк а не Ёрк?
11 votes

Because Russian transliterations are not consistent. The letter ё didn't make it into Russian before late XVIII century. Church Slavonic language didn't use the sound cluster this letter denotes. When ...

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What does this sentence mean? Есть пить? Пить есть, Есть нет
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11 votes

Есть are two distinct, homonymous verbs in Russian. The first one is the present form of "to be," the second one is the infinitive form of "to eat." They have different etymologies,...

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How is the idea of "girlfriend material" naturally expressed in Russian?
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11 votes

You got the idiom right. "Not smbd./smth. material" would be плохой из него выйдет кто-то/что-то, with выйдет frequently omitted: He's not employee material // Скверный из него работник He'...

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Proper translation of "terrible"
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11 votes

Страшная женщина and страшный мужчина mean "ugly". Those words don't describe personality in any way, just the physical appearance. When you want to describe personality, you should use the word ...

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